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Sanders and Giuliani among guests on Sunday's news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

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NBC's "Meet the Press" — Giuliani; Robby Mook, Clinton campaign manager.

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CBS' "Face the Nation" — Pre-empted by NFL coverage.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Sanders, Giuliani.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J.

Tyler Farr on New Single 'Our Town' and Working With Jason Aldean

Tyler Farr recently released his first single off his upcoming third studio album. Titled "Our Town," the song discusses what life was like for the singer as a kid.

Continue reading…

ToC Critic's Pick: Kalie Shorr, 'He's Just Not That Into You' [Listen]

Kalie Shorr's ability to spin a serious message into a pop melody more contagious than the common cold turns up again on "He's Not That Into You," a sugary new song from an upcoming project. Continue reading…

With grim topicality, 'The13th' opens New York Film Festival

The 54th New York Film Festival kicked off Friday under gray autumn skies, cloaked by an unusual degree of topicality.

Ava DuVernay's documentary on mass incarceration, "The 13th," opened the festival, the first documentary to ever mark the start of the Film Society of Lincoln Center's prestigious celebration. Taking its name from the 13th amendment, DuVernay's film traces the criminalization of African Americans from the abolishment of slavery up to today's overcrowded prisons and Black Lives Matter protests.

It's a portrait of racial dominion through history, by names as varied as Jim Crow and the "war on drugs."

"We can no longer say that prison is a place bad people go because it's much more complicated than that," DuVernay said in an interview ahead of the film's premiere.

"The 13th" will go from Lincoln Center to Netflix, where it will debut next week. As the first movie with a streaming release to play in such a coveted spot at the New York Film Festival, the documentary's selection reflects the changing cinematic landscape.

One of the festival's other much-anticipated world premieres, Ang Lee's "Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk," was conceived as an argument for the theatrical experience. Lee's adaption of Ben Fountain's novel about an Iraq war hero on a victory tour in Dallas, was made in 3-D and with a much faster frame-rate than the traditional 24-frames-per-second to boost definition. (Only so many theaters are equipped to screen such a film, so the movie's festival premiere will be held across the street from Lincoln Center, at a multiplex.)

But both films — one made for the immediacy of the small screen, the other a spectacle tailored for the big screen — receive equally significant platforms at the festival.

"I was like: What are you talking about?" says DuVernay of her surprise at being chosen for opening night. "It wasn't made with any intention to be amplified on that scale. I made it to be a resource on Netflix: When you want to know about that thing, this will be here."

But "The 13th" — which DuVernay says was timed purposefully to the election — was immediately hailed Friday by critics as urgent and necessary. The New York Times called it "powerful, infuriating and at times overwhelming."

"Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk" will premiere at the festival Oct. 14 ahead of its November release. But there are many other films in the New York Film Festival's carefully curated slate that make forceful cases for cinema, big and small.

There's Kenneth Lonergan's heart-breaking "Manchester by the Sea," Barry Jenkins' lyrical coming-of-age tale "Moonlight" and Maren Ade's celebrated comedy "Toni Erdmann." Between them, they encompass some of the top breakouts of the film festival circuit, from Sundance, Cannes and Telluride.

But unlike those buzz factories, the New York Film Festival, led by festival director Kent Jones, generally offers a more sober place for assessment and celebration of some of the year's best films from around the world.

Also in the main slate is Gianfranco Rosi's migrant crisis documentary "Fire at Sea," Ken Loach's Palme d'Or-winner "I, Daniel Blake," Jim Jarmusch's "Paterson," starring Adam Driver, and Olivier Assayas' "Personal Shopper," with Kirsten Stewart. The stars of the last two will be individually honored, as well.

Two other world premieres are also on the docket, one which could factor in this fall's Oscar race, another likely to be counted among 2017's best.

Mike Mills ("Beginners") will debut his upcoming "20th Century Woman," a 1970s-set tale about a boy growing up with a single mother in Southern California, starring Annette Bening. And as the festival's closing night film, James Gray will premiere his "The Lost City of Z," an adaption of David Grann's book about the British explorer Percy Fawcett.

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Online: http://www.filmlinc.org/nyff2016/

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Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

With grim topicality, 'The13th' opens New York Film Festival

The 54th New York Film Festival kicked off Friday under gray autumn skies, cloaked by an unusual degree of topicality.

Ava DuVernay's documentary on mass incarceration, "The 13th," opened the festival, the first documentary to ever mark the start of the Film Society of Lincoln Center's prestigious celebration. Taking its name from the 13th amendment, DuVernay's film traces the criminalization of African Americans from the abolishment of slavery up to today's overcrowded prisons and Black Lives Matter protests.

It's a portrait of racial dominion through history, by names as varied as Jim Crow and the "war on drugs."

"We can no longer say that prison is a place bad people go because it's much more complicated than that," DuVernay said in an interview ahead of the film's premiere.

"The 13th" will go from Lincoln Center to Netflix, where it will debut next week. As the first movie with a streaming release to play in such a coveted spot at the New York Film Festival, the documentary's selection reflects the changing cinematic landscape.

One of the festival's other much-anticipated world premieres, Ang Lee's "Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk," was conceived as an argument for the theatrical experience. Lee's adaption of Ben Fountain's novel about an Iraq war hero on a victory tour in Dallas, was made in 3-D and with a much faster frame-rate than the traditional 24-frames-per-second to boost definition. (Only so many theaters are equipped to screen such a film, so the movie's festival premiere will be held across the street from Lincoln Center, at a multiplex.)

But both films — one made for the immediacy of the small screen, the other a spectacle tailored for the big screen — receive equally significant platforms at the festival.

"I was like: What are you talking about?" says DuVernay of her surprise at being chosen for opening night. "It wasn't made with any intention to be amplified on that scale. I made it to be a resource on Netflix: When you want to know about that thing, this will be here."

But "The 13th" — which DuVernay says was timed purposefully to the election — was immediately hailed Friday by critics as urgent and necessary. The New York Times called it "powerful, infuriating and at times overwhelming."

"Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk" will premiere at the festival Oct. 14 ahead of its November release. But there are many other films in the New York Film Festival's carefully curated slate that make forceful cases for cinema, big and small.

There's Kenneth Lonergan's heart-breaking "Manchester by the Sea," Barry Jenkins' lyrical coming-of-age tale "Moonlight" and Maren Ade's celebrated comedy "Toni Erdmann." Between them, they encompass some of the top breakouts of the film festival circuit, from Sundance, Cannes and Telluride.

But unlike those buzz factories, the New York Film Festival, led by festival director Kent Jones, generally offers a more sober place for assessment and celebration of some of the year's best films from around the world.

Also in the main slate is Gianfranco Rosi's migrant crisis documentary "Fire at Sea," Ken Loach's Palme d'Or-winner "I, Daniel Blake," Jim Jarmusch's "Paterson," starring Adam Driver, and Olivier Assayas' "Personal Shopper," with Kirsten Stewart. The stars of the last two will be individually honored, as well.

Two other world premieres are also on the docket, one which could factor in this fall's Oscar race, another likely to be counted among 2017's best.

Mike Mills ("Beginners") will debut his upcoming "20th Century Woman," a 1970s-set tale about a boy growing up with a single mother in Southern California, starring Annette Bening. And as the festival's closing night film, James Gray will premiere his "The Lost City of Z," an adaption of David Grann's book about the British explorer Percy Fawcett.

___

Online: http://www.filmlinc.org/nyff2016/

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Whiskey Myers on Working With Dave Cobb and New Album 'Mud'

Whiskey Myers' latest release Mud includes 10 rollicking new tracks that embody country elements as much as rock 'n' roll. A band described by some critics as one that will save country music, frontman Cody Cannon says it's a lofty compliment that he's not sure they're ready to take on. Continue reading…

Savannah Film Festival to open with Portman as 'Jackie'

The Savannah Film Festival will open in October with a screening of the biographical film "Jackie," starring Natalie Portman as first lady Jacqueline Kennedy.

The Savannah College of Art and Design announced the lineup Friday for its 19th film festival, which is to run from Oct. 22 through Oct. 29.

Directed by Pablo Larrain, "Jackie" follows the widow of President John F. Kennedy in the days following the assassination.

Other films scheduled for the 2016 festival include the original musical "La La Land" starring Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling and John Legend. There will also be a showing of "Arrival," in which Amy Adams leads a team investigating the appearance of mysterious spacecraft across the globe.

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >