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Shooting gets underway for Han Solo 'Star Wars' film

Alden Ehrenreich has taken control of the Millennium Falcon. The Han Solo "Star Wars" spinoff has begun production.

The Walt Disney Co. announced Tuesday that shooting began at London's Pinewood Studios on Monday. To kick off the untitled Han Solo movie, the studio released a photo of the cast at the controls of the Millennium Falcon.

Ehrenreich plays a younger version of Harrison Ford's iconic smuggler and is seated amid cast members including Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke and Donald Glover, who plays Lando Calrissian.

The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, who helmed "The Lego Movie." In a statement they said, "We can't think of anything funny to say, because we just feel really moved, and really lucky."

Disney will release the film in May 2018.

Shooting gets underway for Han Solo 'Star Wars' film

Alden Ehrenreich has taken control of the Millennium Falcon. The Han Solo "Star Wars" spinoff has begun production.

The Walt Disney Co. announced Tuesday that shooting began at London's Pinewood Studios on Monday. To kick off the untitled Han Solo movie, the studio released a photo of the cast at the controls of the Millennium Falcon.

Ehrenreich plays a younger version of Harrison Ford's iconic smuggler and is seated amid cast members including Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke and Donald Glover, who plays Lando Calrissian.

The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, who helmed "The Lego Movie." In a statement they said, "We can't think of anything funny to say, because we just feel really moved, and really lucky."

Disney will release the film in May 2018.

Little Big Town Share New 'When Someone Stops Loving You' [LISTEN]

Little Big Town are giving fans a taste of their new music by sharing "When Someone Stops Loving You" ahead of their new album, 'The Breaker'.

Continue reading…

Review: 'The Inkblots' documents history of Rorschach test

A bear. A bat. A butterfly.

Images seen in Rorschach inkblots reveal the viewer's unconscious mind, including any serious mental disorders. Or do they? Is the Rorschach test a brilliant diagnostic tool, or a glorified parlor trick?

"The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing" raises these questions and lands in the middle. Author Damion Searls concludes, after much throat-clearing, that patients, in partnership with gifted psychologists, may uncover fascinating areas to explore through the Rorschach. But using the results in parental custody lawsuits or other high-stakes arenas, he writes, is fraught with problems.

For instance, what precisely are we testing when we ask people what they see in inkblots? Surprisingly, we don't know. The test's theoretical underpinnings have never been worked out. That hasn't stopped its runaway success.

The 10 cards, printed with symmetrical forms, remain the same as when Swiss psychiatrist Hermann Rorschach first published them in 1921 to accompany his book "Psychodiagnostics." Rorschach's influences included a children's game called klexography, psychoanalysis trailblazers Freud and Jung, and observations of his asylum patients' interpretations of the set of images.

"Rorschach did not conceive of the blots as a 'test' at all: he called it an experiment, a nonjudgmental and open-ended investigation into people's ways of seeing," Searls writes.

Rorschach resisted initial pressure to use his inkblots in schools as an aptitude test. He wrote that the thought of an aspiring student barred from university study because of his work made him feel "a bit like I can't breathe." A systematic collection of test results in a large sample would be required, he wrote, and a solid theoretical basis would need to be established.

Rorschach died tragically at age 37 of peritonitis from a burst appendix a year after publishing "Psychodiagnostics." The inkblots, freed from their creator's control, billowed in popularity as others adapted them to various uses over the decades.

In 1945, a psychiatrist administered the test to Nazi prisoners awaiting judgment in the Nuremberg Trials. In the Sixties, the test peaked at a million uses a year in the United States.

As new data technology emerged in the late 1980s, a new computer program made interpretations based on patient responses to the inkblots. In 2008, Japanese researchers used an MRI to track real-time brain activity of subjects viewing inkblots, finding original and standard answers arise in different parts of the brain.

Pop culture has found the test images irresistible. Andy Warhol made his own series of giant inkblots and titled each of the paintings "Rorschach." Jay Z put one of Warhol's works on the cover of his book "Decoded." Advertisers have used inkblots to sell perfume, investment advice and mobile phones.

Searls, a literary translator of French and German, wades out of his depth when he tries to assess these popularized inkblots as cultural metaphors. The chapter "The Rorschach Test Is Not a Rorschach Test" fails to build a convincing case. But it includes a fun passage where Searls reveals a psychologist tested him with the inkblots and told him he was a little obsessive.

So, there you go: the Rorschach works.

In the end, Searls' obsession with details — gleaned in part from an unpublished archive of source material — grows a bit tiresome. Some readers will find more than they want to know about Rorschach's short life and the subsequent professional feuds over his work's clinical validity and competing scoring systems.

"The Inkblots" is an exhaustive — sometimes exhausting — inspection of a misunderstood psychological test and its inventor. It is impressive to have on the shelf and not always a bear to read. Or is that a butterfly?

Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr reunite in studio

The two surviving members of the Beatles came together in a studio on Sunday for their first recording session together in seven years, according to a social media post from drummer Ringo Starr.

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"Thanks for coming over, man, and playing great bass," Starr wrote on Twitter alongside a photo of himself laughing with Paul McCartney. "I love you, man. Peace and love."

Thanks for coming over man and playing Great bass. I love you man peace and love.pic.twitter.com/Z5kpyLLlkO— #RingoStarr (@ringostarrmusic) February 20, 2017

Starr's publicist confirmed to Billboard that McCartney was in the studio to contribute to Starr's upcoming album. The album is set for release this year, although no date has been announced, the site reported.

Starr also shared an image of the pair posing with Eagles guitarist Joe Walsh, Starr's brother-in-law.

"What a day I'm having," he wrote.

And look out Joe W. came out to play what a day I'm having peace and love.pic.twitter.com/8xQt2j5OLn— #RingoStarr (@ringostarrmusic) February 20, 2017

Starr shared the photos just days after TMZ reported that McCartney, Starr, Walsh, actor Tom Hanks and musician Dave Grohl went to dinner together in Santa Monica.

Starr and McCartney last collaborated on the drummer's 2010 LP "Y Not," according to Rolling Stone. McCartney sings on the song "Walk With You" and plays bass on "Peace Dream."

Counterpoint: Those TV Singing Competitions ARE Worthwhile

Are TV singing competitions like 'The Voice', 'American Idol', 'Nashville Star' and 'Can You Duet' worthwhile? Staff members from The Boot and Taste of Country debate. Continue reading…

Point: Reality Show Tryouts? The Risk Is Greater Than the Reward

A strong showing on The Voice or other singing reality television competitions can be a metaphorical steroid shot for an artist’s career, but like real-life performance enhancers, the cost eventually supersedes the gain.

Continue reading…

Tom Hanks' debut book is due in October

Tom Hanks is putting his love of vintage typewriters to good use — his collection of short stories will be published in October.

The Oscar-winning actor's first book, "UNCOMMON TYPE: Some Stories," features 17 stories, each in some way involving a different typewriter. It's due out Oct. 24 from Alfred A. Knopf, the publisher said Tuesday.

Among the stories written by Hanks, who owns over 100 typewriters, is one about an immigrant arriving in New York City, another about a bowler who becomes a celebrity and another about an eccentric billionaire.

Hanks said in a statement that he began work on the stories in 2015: "I wrote in hotels during press tours. I wrote on vacation. I wrote on planes, at home, and in the office."

'I Liked My Life' an impressive debut by Abby Fabiaschi

The novel "I Liked My Life" begins with Madeline, its main character, assessing a potential new wife for her husband, Brady. It's immediately clear she's dead and speaking from a sort of limbo afterlife.

Within a dozen pages, readers learn that Maddy killed herself by jumping off a building, leaving no note, no explanation, nothing that offers any solace to her husband and teenage daughter, Eve.

Sharing their points of view in individual chapters, Brady reveals himself as a self-absorbed and tuned-out husband, Eve questions every aspect of her behavior toward her mom and both try desperately to make their way through their grief and back to each other.

It's also an insightful examination of marriage and love and friendship and life.

First-time novelist Abby Fabiaschi unwinds a tale wholly compelling, altogether believable and, at times, so heartbreaking it's hard to believe she isn't already an established author. She demonstrates excellent timing and perfect control over the complicated narrative and never allows it to drift toward maudlin. She leaves readers a trail not of breadcrumbs, but gold coins that are irresistible.

And the ending, while perhaps a bit neat and tidy, is entirely unexpected. All in all, "I Liked My Life" is an impossible-to-put-down and impressive debut.

Hungary's Berlin film fest winner Enyedi to adapt novel

The Hungarian director whose "On Body and Soul" won the top award at the Berlin Film Festival says her next project is an adaptation of "The Story of My Wife," a 1942 novel by Hungarian writer and poet Milan Fust.

Director Ildiko Enyedi also said Tuesday that she welcomed the national film fund's support for her work and that of a wide range of Hungarian directors and writers, some of whose films have recently won prizes at international festivals. "Son of Saul" by Laszlo Nemes won the Oscar last year for best foreign-language film.

"I see an intelligent and wise strategy on part of the Film Fund in that they are motivated primarily by professional aspects to help the films," Enyedi said. "The creators are able to bring mature works to the table and that is very significant."

"On Body And Soul," a love story about two slaughterhouse workers who connect in shared dreams, is Enyedi's first feature film since 1999. It won the Berlin Film Festival's Golden Bear award on Saturday.

Enyedi has been critical of the cultural policies and perceived democratic shortfalls of Prime Minister Viktor Orban's government. She said that while her opinions had not changed, she regretted if they distracted from the success of the film.

"We've made a beautiful film for everyone ... and I wish we could enjoy what we have put so much work into," Enyedi said. "I don't think it's up to any culture policy to declare what is good or not."

Enyedi's film won several other prizes in Berlin, including one from the Ecumenical Jury she said was particularly meaningful.

"It means that we achieved our goal of reaching many different kinds of people," Enyedi said. "My mother is Lutheran, my father was Jewish, my husband is Catholic ... and our children are ecumenical in their very existence."

Enyedi, 61, won the Golden Camera award in Cannes with her 1989 debut film, "My 20th Century."

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