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Broadway stars team up with James Corden for Carpool Karaoke

This isn't your buddy's karaoke night. These guys can actually sing ... on key.

James Corden's latest installment of "Carpool Karaoke" flipped coasts and traveled the streets of New York City.

The late night host is adding extra hosting duties this week, this time headlining the Tony Awards Sunday night

>> Read more trending stories  

That gig opened the door for a Broadway version of Corden's popular franchise, with guests like Lin-Manuel Miranda, from the hit "Hamilton," Audra McDonald, Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Jane Krakowski.

They lend their voices, not only to a song from "Hamilton," but also hits from "Rent," "Jersey Boys" and finally "Les Miserables."

Watch the video below, or click here:

Comedian Lewis Black in Dayton this week

Comedian/playwright Lewis Black will be in Dayton this week to attend a performance of his play, “One Slight Hitch,” announced the Human Race Theatre Company.

Black will attend Wednesday's performance of the romantic comedy at Human Race's base theater, The Loft Theater at 126 N. Main St., next to the Victoria Theatre. After the performance, Black will speak to the audience about his play. 

Black is also known for stand-up comedy and appearing on “Comedy Central” and “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” 

"One Slight Hitch" runs through Saturday, April 24. Tickets can be purchased through Ticket Center Stage: www.ticketcenterstage.com or 937-228-3630.  

Why now is the perfect time to visit Cincinnati museum

WANT TO GO?

WHAT: “Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape”

WHERE: Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike Street, Cincinnati

WHEN: Through May 29. Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Due to the popularity of the exhibition, admission on Sundays is only by timed tickets secured in advance. Timed tickets are also strongly recommended for Tuesday through Saturday as well. If you choose not to purchase tickets in advance, you may experience a delay until the next entry time becomes available.

TICKETS: Admission to the Taft Museum of Art is $15, which includes entrance to the special exhibition as well as the rest of the museum. Sunday admission is $5, which includes entrance to the special exhibition and youth and children are free. Timed tickets will be available for purchase at www.taftmuseum.org. Note that Sunday admission for the permanent collection at the historic house is free.

Special events and programming:

  • A symposium from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 16 will focus on Daubigny’s innovations, contributions, and interactions with the Impressionists, and his influence on Vincent van Gogh. Tickets are $45 for non-members and include lunch. Reservations required. Call (513) 684-4516 or visit www.taftmuseum.org.
  • “From Palette to Palate: The Art and Food of the Impressionists” will take place at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 1. Taft Executive Chef Luke Radkey will explore the French culinary palate with sample small bites. It’s $15 for non-members.
  • Art À La Carte (Just for Young Professionals) is slated for 5-8 p.m. Friday, May 13. The evening features wine, painting, music and poetry.
  • “En Plein Air Landscape Painting Workshop” will be held from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 14 and Sunday, May 15. Dayton landscape artist Gretchen Durst Jacobs will conduct a two-day workshop in oil paints. On the first day, you’ll look at Daubigny’s landscapes and sketch and paint on the Taft’s grounds. On day two, participants will walk to the river and find a location to make their own landscape en plein air. Paint and canvas will be supplied. Tickets are $80 non-members. Reservations required: (513) 684-4516 or www.taftmuseum.org. Includes admission to the museum and special exhibition.

 

Reservations required for all of the related programs. Call (513) 684-4516 or visit www.taftmuseum.org.

EXTRAS

Publication: A fully illustrated 176-page catalogue is available in the museum gift shop for $35.

Audio Tour: A free audio tour is available to visitors at www.taftmuseum.org. Printed versions of the audio tour will be available for visitors without smartphones and those who are hearing impaired.

Lunch: Cafe reservations are required. Call (513) 352-5140 to book your table.

If you’ve never been to the Taft Museum, you’re missing one of Southwest Ohio’s artistic gems.

Located in downtown Cincinnati, the museum is housed in the former home of Charles and Anna Taft — President William Howard Taft’s half-brother and his wife. The couple amassed an amazing collection of European old master and 19th-century paintings, American art, European sculpture and decorative arts and Chinese porcelain. Their 700 treasures are on display in the historic home that opened to the public in 1932 and includes a 2004 addition.

A registered National Historic Landmark, the house is the oldest domestic wooden structure remaining in its original location in Cincinnati and is considered one of the finest examples of Federal architecture in the Palladian style in the country.

WHY NOW IS AN IDEAL TIME TO VISIT MUSEUM

In addition to seeing the wonderful permanent collection, through the end of May visitors can take in a rare, impressive international exhibition “Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape.” The show, produced by the Taft in conjunction with the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh and the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, aims to educate visitors about the origins of Impressionism through the work of Charles François Daubigny, a central figure in the development of 19th-century French landscape painting.

“It’s the most ambitious project we’ve ever taken on,” said Deborah Emont Scott, Taft director and CEO. “We have loans from museums and private collections throughout North America and Europe.”

If you’re a regular visitor to the Dayton Art Institute, you’ll have seen work by Daubigny. The museum owns three works by the artist including “A Lake in the Woods at Dusk,” a painting on view in the Monet gallery. The label points out the ways in which Daubigny’s interest in painting out-of-doors and “brushy application of paint” provided an important example to later Impressionists.

The Cincinnati exhibition, which runs through May 29, will then travel to Edinburgh and Amsterdam later in 2016 and 2017. It is not scheduled to be shown anywhere else in the United States.

DAYTON CONNECTION

A reconstruction of Daubigny’s studio boat, constructed by Dayton’s Tristan Cupp — Zoot Theatre’s well-known co-founder and artistic director — is also on view. The boat reinforces one of the main themes of the exhibition: Daubigny’s innovative approach to painting landscapes from a water-level perspective. Video clips provided by the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts provide several landscape views and a time lapse video demonstrating the painting process so visitors will see first-hand what it’s like to paint on a boat and how an artist paints a landscape on the river.

40 WORKS OF ART ON DISPLAY

The 40 Daubigny masterpieces on display showcase the range of Daubigny’s achievements over four decades. You’ll see lovely paintings of the Seine and Oise rivers, stormy atmospheric views of the Normandy coast, and lush fields in the countryside outside Paris. As the exhibit demonstrates, all of these inspired Monet and Pissarro.

Daubigny’s panoramic views of the sunny grain-fields near Auvers were admired by Van Gogh, who adopted Daubigny’s then famous double-wide canvas formats for his own pictures of the plains near Auvers. The final section of the exhibition includes five masterpieces by Van Gogh that reflect Daubigny’s influence.

Highlights of the exhibition include Daubigny’s views of blossoming orchards, a subject he invented that the Impressionists soon took up, and dramatic moonlit landscapes; Pissarro’s “The Banks of the Oise near Pontoise” which echoes Daubigny’s compositions; Monet’s “Autumn on the Seine, Argenteuil,” which was painted from Monet’s studio boat; and the swirling intensity of Van Gogh’s “Daubigny’s Garden.”

MUST-SEES IN THE PERMANENT GALLERIES

Be sure to allow yourself enough time to walk through the rooms in the historic home filled with priceless art. For a tour of the highlights, pick up the “Taft Top 10” flyer.

The museum houses portraits by Rembrant and John Singer Sargent and a beautiful painting “At the Piano” by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, which is considered to be the artist’s first masterpiece. The landscape murals by Ronert S. Duncanson, are the most ambitious surviving pre-Civil War mural paintings for a home and a landscape by Joseph Mallord William Turner also anticipates some aspects of Impressionism.

'Hamilton' posted a casting call, but one of its stipulations is causing quite the stir

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The popular Broadway show “Hamilton” was praised for its diverse cast until the producers posted a casting notice specifying that they were looking for “non-white” actors.

The casting notice came as the show intends to expand to other cities, but it may be illegal. According to Newman Ferrara Law Firm lawyer Randolph McLaughlin, the notice violates the New York City Human Rights Law, which makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate based on race.

>> RELATED: 'Hamilton' cast members performed at the White House, and it was epic

The producer, Jeffrey Seller, defended his “non-white” casting notice WCBS, saying, “I stand by it and believe it to be legal.”

McLaughlin claims the producers can cast whoever they want based on artistic preference but must allow everyone to try out for the role.

“What if they put an ad out that said, ‘Whites only need apply?’” he said. “Why, African-Americans, Latinos, Asians would be outraged.”

>> Read more trending stories

The casting notice also appears to violate the policy of Actors Equity, which specifies that “…producers agree that auditions for all productions … will be conducted in such a manner as to provide full and fair consideration to actors of all ethnicities.”

The “Hamilton” press representative said the casting notice was approved by Actors Equity, but the union’s general counsel claims this is not the case. The audition notice they approved welcomed “all ethnicities.”

The City Commission on Human Rights has yet to receive a complaint but would not say if it was investigating the “non-white” casting notice.

A source informed WCBS that the commission would probably work with the “Hamilton” production team to help it comply with city laws if the controversy becomes an issue.

>> Click here to watch a video report

Misty Copeland re-creates famous Edgar Degas paintings

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Misty Copeland, who became the first African-American woman to be named a principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre last year, has already established herself as a legend.

>> Read more trending stories

Now the 33-year-old is re-creating the beauty of ballet in another art form. The March issue of Harper's Bazaar magazine will feature the ballerina in photos reminiscent of works of 19th century French artist Edgar Degas.   

In high-end fashions by designers like Oscar de la Renta and Alexander McQueen, Copeland posed to capture scenes from Degas' famous portraits and sculptures like "Little Dancer Aged Fourteen," "The Star" and "Green Dancer."

"I definitely feel like I can see myself in that sculpture—she just seems content but also reserved," Copeland told Harper's Bazaar about posing for "Little Dancer." "I was really shy and introverted at that age. I don't even have an image in my head of what I remember a ballerina being or existing before I took a ballet class. Ballet was just the one thing that brought me to life."

The photo shoot celebrates "Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty," an exhibition that will debut at the New York Museum of Modern Art in March. 

Read more here.

@harpersbazaarus she channels artist #EdgarDegas's most famous ballet works ahead of a new exhibition at #MOMA, dancer @MistyOnPointe opens up about what it feels like to make history. Go to the link in our bio to read her interview from the March 2016 issue and see the full fashion shoot by Ken Browar and Deborah Ory of @NYCDanceProject, styled by @Michelle_Jank. A photo posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Feb 10, 2016 at 6:33am PST

@harpersbazaarus As she channels artist #EdgarDegas's most famous ballet works ahead of a new exhibition at #MOMA, dancer @MistyOnPointe opens up about what it feels like to make history. Go to the link in our bio to read her interview from the March 2016 issue and see the full fashion shoot by @KenBrowar and @DeborahOry of @NYCDanceProject, styled by @Michelle_Jank. A photo posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Feb 10, 2016 at 12:11pm PST

"Misty Copeland: The Art of Dance  From Harper's BAZAAR As she channels the artist Edgar Degas’s most famous ballet works ahead of a new exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, dancer Misty Copeland opens up about what it feels like to make history. Video shot by Sandy Chase. Photography by Ken Browar and Deborah Ory of the NYC Dance Project. To learn more visit:http://www.nycdanceproject.com #mistycopeland #harpers #beautiful" (via #RapidRepost @AppsKottage) A video posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Feb 10, 2016 at 6:21pm PST

Repost By @kristelyulo: "Ballet + Degas + Fashion: Trifecta! RG @harpersbazaarus - Watch #MistyOnPointe channel Edgar Degas' ballerinas. http://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/art-books-music/a14055/misty-copeland-degas-0316/" (via #RapidRepost @AppsKottage) A video posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Feb 11, 2016 at 5:47am PST

nycdanceproject One of the images from our photo shoot with Misty Copeland and Harper's Bazaar - the story is coming out in their March issue. @nycdanceproject @mistyonpointe @harpersbazaarus @instagram #edgardegas #nycdanceproject #mistycopeland #harpersbazaar #tutu #ballet #degas #moma A photo posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Feb 11, 2016 at 3:53pm PST

Seattle company designs invisible art revealed in rain

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A Seattle startup said it is hoping to make rainy days a little brighter for everyone after designing a product that makes rain-activated art on sidewalks and other surfaces.

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The art is made with a stencil and a superhydrophobic coating spray that keeps water from soaking into surfaces, creating different shades of color.

>> Photos: Seattle invisible art revealed in rain

The product can be used on absorbent surfaces, including concrete, wood, stone, cardboard and fabric, and is invisible on a dry and sunny day.

The idea came from Peregrine Church, who considers himself part artist, part engineer and part inventor.

Last April, he and his business partner made a video for a Kickstarter campaign and it went viral.

The product is called Rainworks, and with 690 backers and $50,000 from the Kickstarter campaign, they've been filling numerous orders via their website

For $29, customers get a bottle of “invisible spray” that covers roughly 15 square feet, a stencil to make their own Rainwork and video instructions.

“My priority isn't making money. My priority is helping people make the world a better place. So once we're off the ground and flying, it'll be a lot of fun,” said Church.

The designs generally last about four to five weeks, depending on conditions. Since it’s temporary, it’s not considered graffiti in public areas.      

Rainworks is not only making art around the city, but is also putting messages and inspirational words in public areas, such as bus stops and parks.

The company is also creating online maps of Rainworks designs the company and others have done so that people can visit and see the designs.

Misty Copeland named ABT's first-ever black principal dancer

Much beloved dancer and African American Misty Copeland has made history. The petite 32-year-old was named principal dancer for American Ballet Theatre, the first-ever in the company’s 75-year history.

Copeland’s promotion – after 14 years at the company – comes at a time when the woman’s growing celebrity and popularity brought her fame beyond ballet circles, the New York Times reported.

Copeland faced many obstacles in her climb to the top of the artistic world. She suffered through a high-profile custody fight with her mother, where Copeland fought to be emancipated from her, but her mother successfully regained custody.

Copeland grew up poor, one of six children in San Pedro, Calif. And she was late to the ballet world, beginning her formal dance training at age 13, about seven years later than most dancers. She was so gifted, however, that she was taken in by her ballet teacher. Besides being black, Copeland also was thought to be too short and too muscular to dance with an elite ballet company.

Copeland made her debut last week in the lead role of “Swan Lake,” considered one of the premiere roles in the ballet world.

By @juliekentofficial via @RepostWhiz app: Exciting promotions at ABT this morning!! Misty Copeland, Principal Dancer!!! ❤️ #MistyCopeland #ballerina #weloveyou (#RepostWhiz app) A video posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Jun 30, 2015 at 10:19am PDT

By @efe_04 via @RepostWhiz app: You make it look so easy!! @mistyonpointe 💖👌🏽💋What an amazing performance!!! #abt #mistycopeland #swanlake #offbucketlist #stunning #inspirational #breakingbarriers #nyc #ballet (#RepostWhiz app) A video posted by Misty Copeland (@mistyonpointe) on Jun 25, 2015 at 11:51am PDT

Photos: 2014 Kennedy Center Honors

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