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Best Ohio burger isn't a burger

Want to go?

WHAT: The Maid-Rite Sandwich Shoppe

WHERE: 125 N. Broadway St., Greenville OH

HOURS: 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday

INFO: or 937-548-9340

What makes a burger a burger?

Mental_Floss came out with a list of “The Best Burger in All 50 States,” and Ohio’s winner? The loose-meat sandwich at The Maid-Rite Sandwich Shoppe in Greenville.

>> RELATED: 15 amazing burgers in Dayton

Here’s what Mental_ Floss writes about the sandwich:

"Many Ohioans know and love Swensons in Cleveland (including Akron native LeBron James), but few have heard of hidden gem Maid-Rite in Greenville. Established in 1934, Maid-Rite’s loose-meat burgers have a cult following among those in on the tasty secret, with many driving hours out of the way to get their fill of delicious Maid-Rite and Cheese-Rite sandwiches."

Some folks may have a beef with this selection because by definition, a hamburger consists of at least one ground meat patty. But don't try that argument with the locals.

"Beef is beef," said Matt Staugler, the executive director of the Darke County Visitors Bureau. "It's such a well-known novelty here in Darke County, and I would be surprised if it didn't get that recognition."

The Maid-Rite sandwich has NO patty. It’s more like a sloppy joe. Well, sort of, but not really, because a sloppy joe consists of loose meat with tomato-based sauce. Staugler even admits: "It's a sloppy joe without the sloppy."

Unlike a sloppy joe, the meat for the Maid-Rite sandwich isn't fried in its own grease. "It's steamed ground beef with a seasoning put over it," said Mark Koontz, one of the members of the family that's owned and operated restaurant since it opened more than 80 years ago.

The loose hamburger meat has hint of sweetness. We asked, what is its secret ingredient? "A lot of love and family dedication," said Koontz, who added that he's been around that restaurant "ever since I was little."

The sandwich comes with your choice of mustard, pickle and onion, on a bun, for $2.05. Add a slice of cheese and the price is $2.30.

Just as intriguing as its loose meat sandwich is the outside of the Maid-Rite building. It's rather nondescript except for the fact that diners stick their chewing gum on the wall. Over the years, I’ve contributed to the thousands upon thousands of colorful hardened globs affixed to the bricks.

If you’ve been looking for an excuse to take a day trip, here it is. Or you can wait until July 26-31 when Darke County hosts the annual Annie Oakley Festival. While the festival will be held north of Greenville, the city will hold its annual Annie Oakley Sidewalk Sales, with many local businesses participating.

On July 30-31, Greenville will also be holding The Gathering at Garst, which was named the Best Summer Festival for 2016 by Ohio Magazine based on a reader poll.

The Maid-Rite Sandwich Shoppe may be jam-packed that week while Greenville celebrates its heritage, which includes the world’s most popular female sharpshooter, but the reward of a famous loose-meat sandwich is worth a shot. Koontz assures us that the diner will be ready to handle the crowds during the festivals. If you go, here's an insider's tip: Buy gum ahead of time so you can leave your mark on the outside wall. "We don't sell gum," Koontz said.

Do you think the loose-meat Maid-Rite Sandwich deserves to be called the best burger in Ohio? Tell us what your favorite burger is.

British restaurant owner gets 6 years for killing man with curry

An owner of an Indian restaurant in North Yorkshire, England, was sentenced to six years in prison after he served a curry dish containing peanuts to a customer with an allergy, resulting in his death.

>> Read more trending stories  

Mohammaed Zaman was sentenced Monday after being found guilty of manslaughter by gross negligence among other food-safety offenses, The New York Times reported. The incident happened in January 2014 when Paul Wilson, 38, ordered chicken tikka masala from Zaman’s restaurant, Indian Garden, and specified he couldn’t have any nuts in his order.

Wilson had visited the restaurant previously and was given a container with "no nuts" written on top of it, the Times added.

He was found by a roommate dead after going into anaphylactic shock, prosecutors said.

According to authorities, Zaman cut corners by replacing almond powder in his recipes with a cheaper mix of groundnuts and hired undocumented workers to put together his curry dishes. There was an incident with another customer with a nut allergy three weeks before Wilson’s death.

"Time and again he ignored the danger and did not protect his customers," Richard Wright, told a jury at Teesside Crown Court, according to the Times.

Zaman had about $434,000 in debt, which led to his cutting corners, the Times reported. He also had a tendency to not be at the restaurant, allowing his employees to run the operations, and was not there when the curry was served to Wilson.

"Paul Wilson was in the prime of his life," Judge Simon Bourne-Arton told Zaman, according to the Yorkshire Post. "He, like you, worked in the catering trade. He, unlike you, was a careful man."

Read more at The New York Times.

Here's why Beyonce fans attacked Chick-fil-A

Caribou Coffee's parent company buys Krispy Kreme

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

JAB Beech, the company that owns Caribou Coffee, will acquire Krispy Kreme, JAB Beech officials announced Monday.

>> Read more trending stories  

The Luxembourg-based investment firm, which also owns Keurig and shares in Einstein Bros. Bagels and high-end shoe retailer Jimmy Choo, purchased the doughnut company in a deal worth an estimated $1.35 billion.

A senior partner at JAB said that the acquisition is part of the company's strategy to invest in brands with "significant growth prospects," the Associated Press reported.

Krispy Kreme's stock rose $4.06, more than 24 percent, to $20.92 on Monday afternoon. JAB will pay for each share of Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc., with a plan to close the deal in the third quarter this year

According to JAB Holdings, Krispy Kreme will continue to be independently operated from its headquarters in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The company said it will postpone its annual shareholders meeting, which was originally set for June 14.

Krispy Kreme, which was founded in 1937, has more than 1,100 locations internationally. About 300 of those are located in the United States, and other stores are located in countries including Australia, Canada, Japan, Mexico, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

Krispy Kreme said in March that it planned to open at least 120 new international locations and about 30 new shops domestically.

New York mayor, officials say they won't go to Chick-fil-A

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other city officials are speaking out against Chick fil-A.

>> Read more trending stories  

The suggestion comes as the chicken chain announced plans to open a restaurant in Queens Center Mall, the fourth location in the city. 

"We look forward to opening our first restaurant in Queens and serving all of our customers delicious food in an environment of genuine hospitality," a Chick-fil-A spokesperson said.

But de Blasio says Chick fil-A supports groups that promote discrimination against gay people.

"What the ownership of Chick-fil-A has said is wrong," de Blasio said. "I’m certainly not going to patronize them, and I wouldn’t urge any other New Yorker to patronize them. But they do have a legal right."

"Chick-fil-A is anti-LGBT," councilman Danny Dromm said in a statement. "This group imparts a strong anti-LGBT message by forcing their employees and volunteers to adhere to a policy that prohibits same-sex love. It is outrageous that Chick-fil-A is quietly spreading its message of hate by funding these types of organizations."

In 2012, Chick-fil-A gained attention when it came to light that the company had donated millions of dollars to organizations that fight same-sex marriage. 

The restaurant chain, which is closed on Sundays, is known for heralding Christian beliefs.

"As it relates to society in general, I think we are inviting God’s judgment on our nation when we shake our fist at him and say, ‘We know better than you as to what constitutes a marriage,'" Dan T. Cathy, the company’s president and chief operating officer, said in an interview.

But a Chick-fil-A spokesperson said that the company employees thousands of people who represent varied backgrounds and beliefs and that the business' main focus is on satisfactory service and food. 

"The Chick-fil-A culture and service tradition in our restaurants is to treat every person with honor, dignity and respect -- regardless of their beliefs, race, creed, sexual orientation or gender," the spokesperson said. 

Chicken fingers: KFC releases edible nail polish

It's a common joke to say that an unfamiliar food tastes like chicken. But now a new nail polish literally tastes like chicken.

>> Read more trending stories  

KFC recently introduced an edible nail polish to its Hong Kong market.

The product, created by marketing firm Ogilvy & Mather and food technologists from McCormick, comes in two flavors -- Original and Hot & Spicy. Original is a gold beige color and Hot & Spicy is a shade of orange red.

According to KFC, the nail polish is applied like regular nail polish but is "sourced from natural ingredients" and can be safely licked. In fact, the company says the nail polish is "finger lickin' good."

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"Yes, it is actually a real thing," said Anna Mugglestone, marketing and communications director for Ogilvy & Mather. "I tried it myself in the office when they were doing testing. It tastes like chicken. It’s crazy. I don’t know how they do it."

"The recipe for our edible nail polish is unique and was specifically designed to hold the flavor, but to also dry with a glossy coat similar to normal nail polish," Ogilvy creative director John Kay told Adweek. "This campaign is designed to be intriguing and fun (and) to increase excitement around the KFC brand in Hong Kong."

Mugglestone said the nail polish is a way "to remind the younger generation (of ) the great taste and good times the brand stands for."

“(The Original color) is actually pretty cute for spring if, you know, it didn’t taste like fried chicken,” said one writer at Glamour magazine.

KFC is running an ad campaign in Hong Kong to ask customers which flavor should be mass produced.

This is for real. Finger lickin' good KFC nail polish. They teamed with McCormick spices to create their secret 11 herbs and spices into a "completely edible" nail polish. You let it dry and can lick on it over and over. Original recipe or hot & spicy.... Yay or nay? . #kfcnailpolish #fitgirlsguide #28dayjumpstart #makeyourownmagic #beyourownfitgirl #fitsisters A photo posted by @fitgirl.swissmiss on May 5, 2016 at 6:54am PDT <script async defer src="//"></script>

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