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Keith Urban Jams With Nile Rodgers at Los Angeles Gig [Watch]

Keith Urban invited the legendary Nile Rodgers onstage at his show at the Staples Center in Los Angeles Thursday night (Oct. 20), to help him perform their collaboration, "Sun Don't Let Me Down." Continue reading…

Top 10 Alison Krauss Songs

The Boot counts down Alison Krauss' best songs.

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Kelly Clarkson Celebrates Third Anniversary With Sweet Photo

Kelly Clarkson and Brandon Blackstock celebrated their third anniversary in an adorable way reminiscent of childhood love, by carving their initials into a tree.

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Tim McGraw Makes Country Music History

Congratulations to Tim McGraw, who has made history this week by becoming the first solo artist to have three singles simultaneously featured in the Top 15 on the Mediabase Country singles chart.

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Miranda Lambert Teases Lyrics From 'The Weight of These Wings'

Miranda Lambert has been teasing the details of her upcoming album, The Weight of These Wings, and now she's given fans a possible hint as to some of the lyrics.

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Yes, New Shania Twain Music Is Really Coming

Shania Twain fans are breathing a sigh of relief this week as the iconic country artist announced she will, in fact, be releasing new music soon, despite her Farewell Tour.

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Emmylou Harris: 'The Real Fun Is Making the Music'

Emmylou Harris talks with The Boot about 'The Complete Trio Collection' and her work with Rodney Crowell.

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Nobel academy member calls Bob Dylan's silence 'arrogant'

A member of the Swedish Academy that awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature to Bob Dylan says the American singer-songwriter's silence since receiving the honor is "impolite and arrogant."

Per Wastberg said Dylan's lack of reaction to the honor the academy bestowed on him last week was predictable, but disrespectful nonetheless.

"One can say that it is impolite and arrogant. He is who he is," Wastberg was quoted as saying in Saturday's edition of the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter.

Wastberg said the academy still hopes to communicate with the 75-year-old artist, whose Nobel credits him with creating "new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition."

"We have agreed not to lift a finger. The ball lies entirely on his half," Wastberg told the newspaper. "You can speculate as much as you want but we don't." He was not immediately available for comments.

The academy said it has failed to reach the tight-lipped laureate since he became the first musician in the Nobel's 115-year history to win the prize in literature. The award was mentioned on Dylan's official Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Dylan spokesman Larry Jenkins did not respond to an email Saturday seeking comment.

The literature prize and five other Nobel Prizes will be officially conferred in Stockholm on Dec. 10, the anniversary of award founder Alfred Nobel's death in 1896.

Literature laureates have skipped the ceremony before. In 2004, Austrian playwright and novelist Elfriede Jelinek stayed home, citing a social phobia.

Harold Pinter and Alice Munro missed the ceremony for health reasons in 2005 and 2013, respectively.

Only two people have declined a Nobel Prize in literature. Boris Pasternak did so under pressure from Soviet authorities in 1958 and Jean-Paul Sartre, who declined all official honors, turned it down in 1964.

Although Dylan has not commented publicly on winning the Nobel, privacy and the price of fame have been themes in his music.

It's easy to read a response to Wastberg's remarks in the 1981 song, "The Groom's Still Waiting at The Altar."

"Try to be pure at heart, they arrest you for robbery," part of the lyrics say. "Mistake your shyness for aloofness, your silence for snobbery."

Each of this year's Nobel Prizes is worth 8 million Swedish kronor, or about $930,000.

Rick-rolled at 50: Astley has new music, new outlook

Rick Astley exiled himself from music for a good part of the last three decades, but he never really left pop's consciousness.

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For one, hits like “Never Gonna Give You Up” and “It Would Take A Strong Strong Man,” derided by critics as cheesy at the time, have endured. Then there's the whole rick-rolling phenomenon when a promised link on a website turns out instead to be an Astley video.

At first, Astley was annoyed by rick-rolling. Then his daughter helped him realize that it was cool and that it helped boost his profile during his fallow years by keeping his boyish face in ours.

He's even more appreciative now as he releases "50," his first album of new music in 23 years.

"The idea of me releasing a new record now I need every bit of help I can get," he quipped.

He may not have needed it as much as he thought: The album debuted at the top of the charts in his native United Kingdom, and when he performed his first U.S. shows in New York and Los Angeles over the summer, they sold out. He wrapped up a short U.S. tour earlier this month.

The still boyish-looking Astley recently sat down with The Associated Press to talk about life after his '80s pop success, rick-rolling and what music means to him now.

AP: During your break, did you ever long to get back to music?

Astley: I think you never lose that feeling of 'cause you know I still got an ego whether you retire or not. I mean, it's still there and there is a little voice on your shoulder sort of saying, 'You're better than him.'... I think that is one the lucky things about what I chose to do and what I love to do, you know ... it is a young person's world really, but you know an old boy like me can still make a record and can still make a bit of a splash.

AP: You think the whole 'rick-roll' thing was good for you?

Astley: Absolutely it was because I think if you're doing anything like music or movies, there is so much competition. ... And also there have been some really, really clever things done with that song. It has not just been rick-roll. There have been so many different things. One of my favorites is they got (President Barack) Obama to sing "Never Gonna Give You Up" (in a mash-up video) or say it at least, which I thought was brilliant. I mean, it's obviously somebody with too much time on their hands, but they also did that with "Mad Men" as well.

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AP: There are some artists who only want to perform their new songs. What's your take?

Astley: I'm not really in that camp, to be honest, because I had a long break from it, so it's not like I have been singing those tunes for 30 years. You know, I am fully aware of the fact that the only reason you know we had a No. 1 album in the U.K. with this record it's like the reason it got played on the radio with the first couple of tunes and stuff. ... When we play live and stuff, there is a part of me thinking, 'Great, we are going to finish "Never Gonna Give You Up," and I know every single person in this room or in this field knows that tune.' They might not all like it, but I know they all know it.

AP: What do you think of your music legacy? Are you resentful that some dismissed your music at the time?

Astley: No. I mean if I'd been a journalist and I had been reviewing my records ... you know I'm not so sure what I would think of it either. I mean, I think there are some really great strong pop songs ... but just looking at it you kind of think. 'Well yeah, but it's a bit manufactured. ' ... I don't hold any grudges for people who had a go at me, you know what I mean? That's for sure.

26 Years Ago: Tim McGraw Signs With Curb Records

On Oct. 22, 1990, Tim McGraw signed his first record deal, with Curb Records.

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