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PHOTOS: Fall Bier Fest 

Beer, brats, food trucks and a few more reasons to go to Oktoberfest

For the 46th time, the Dayton Art Institute will be throwing its annual Oktoberfest fundraising party, adding the unusual component of arts and crafts to the usual German food, music, and beer. 

>> What you need to know about Oktoberfest 2017 at DAI

In addition to the over 60 visiting artisans displaying and selling their wares, the museum’s permanent collection, including their current special exhibition, “Alphonse Mucha: Master of Art Nouveau,” will be open to patrons.

>> PHOTOS: Dayton Art Institute's Oktoberfest 2016

“The vibe changes from day to night,” said Amy Askins, DAI Oktoberfest Co-Chair. “During the day, it’s more chill. People are more interested in perusing the artisans. At night, it’s packed. It’s a party.”

>> 50 ideas for your Dayton summer bucket list

A few notable facts about DAI Oktoberfest 2017:

LEDERHOSEN LUNCH AND PREVIEW PARTY (LEDERHOSEN OPTIONAL)

Many people like to start their weekend early, so the DAI Oktoberfest is offering heavily discounted lunch and libations Friday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Brats, metts, tenderloins will be $5, and potato salad and the homemade noodles are $3 (or you combo it with a dessert for $10).

The beer and wine is $5. The beer list includes Miller Lite, Terrapin High 5 IPA, Blue Moon, Crispin Original Apple Cider, Leinenkugel’s Oktoberfest and Harvest Shandy, and Warsteiner’s Dunkel, Oktoberfest, Koenig Ludwig Hefeweiss, and Pilsner beers. Wines are Michelle Sparkling Brut, Dr. L Riesling, Rodney Strong Chardonnay, Save Me San Francisco Cabernet Sauvignon, and Deloach Pinot Noir.

The preview party will also feature these beverages, accompanied by live music from This Side Up, a Dayton-based rock cover band. Askins said that while lederhosen is certainly welcome, it is not mandatory, or even expected.

“We encourage people who work downtown to come out,” she said. “So they’ll be in their ordinary work attire. But a few people will be wearing (lederhosen) for sure.”

>> When the community came together to open the Dayton Art Institute

THE MAIN EVENT

For the main two-day party, there will be a full live music lineup and art-related activities for children. Most importantly, the one beer truck open for the lederhosen lunch and preview party will be joined by five others, bearing breweries such as Fat Head, Mad Tree, Dogfish, Great Lakes, and popular individual varieties such as New Belgium Fat Tire, Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale, and Stone Arrogant Bastard. On the wine side, an additional Riesling, Chardonnay, and two Cabernet Sauvignons will be added, as well as a Pinot Grigio and a Dark Red.

According to DAI organizers, the food options remain fairly consistent from year to year, with popular favorites such as Zombie Dogz and the Associate Board Alumni (the museum’s own) Brats & Metts. The few notable newbies this year are Kona Ice, Nida Thai, and the Drunken Waffle, which features such delicacies as the Reservoir Dog (a waffled corn dog), the Boba Feta Burger (quarter pounder topped with feta cheese and pesto between a waffle), and the Bocheesian Rhapsody (grilled cheddar and Jack cheese between a waffle). 

>> PHOTOS: Dayton Art Institute Art Ball 2017

ART AT OKTOBERFEST

Every year, the DAI offers an “official mug of Oktoberfest.” According to Chris Schairbaum, DAI Oktobefest Co-Chair, they typically sell over 1,000 of these each year. This year, Bubba Jones Cups, an Ohio potter who specializes in handmade ceramic items for craft breweries and enthusiasts, is designing the mug. There will be 16-ounce and 32-ounce mugs available, along with a few ceramic growlers. A mug purchase comes with a free beer ticket.

According to Askins, they had a larger-than-usual group of artisans applying to participate this year, including Renata Kelly, a wearable art artisan who makes, among other things, a shawl one can wear eight different ways.

“Every year, I go home with a new pair of earrings or a bracelet,” said Askins. “We have a handful of people who work in metal and glass, everything from large sculptures you can hang outside to centerpieces for large rooms to items that can fit in your hand. We have committee heads for all of these areas, and they really went above and beyond as far as recruitment.” 

WANT TO GO?

What: The Dayton Art Institute Oktoberfest

When: Sept. 22-24, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 7-11 p.m. Friday, noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday, and noon-7 p.m. Sunday

Where: Dayton Art Institute, 456 Belmonte Park N, Dayton

Cost: $3-$7 (general), $55-$95 (preview party), free for children 6 and younger

More Info: 937-223-4ART or www.daytonartinstitute.org/oktoberfest

Celebrate the 4th all day at Centerville's Americana Festival

What began in 1972 as a sidewalk sale promoted by the Centerville downtown merchants is now one of the area's most celebrated and patriotic Fourth of July events. 

The 44th Annual Centerville-Washington Township Americana Festival kicks off on Tuesday, July 4 with a bevy of events leading up to the fireworks display at Centerville High School. With this year's theme being The Best is Yet to Come, here are the reasons why you should venture into Elk Country this holiday weekend:

1. Run a 5K

The Up and Running Americana 5k Run/Walk starts at 7:30 a.m. July 4 at the Centerville High School Stadium on East Franklin Street, and follows the parade route down Franklin Street to just past Magsig Middle School, where the runners and walkers will turn around and head back to the high school. The race finishes with a lap around the track in the stadium. The race is chip timed and results will be available immediately at the race.

>>RELATED: The best places to watch the fireworks

2. Watch the parade

The parade begins at 10 a.m. July 4 on East Franklin Street, west of Centerville High School, and proceeds West to Cline Elementary on Virginia Avenue. Showcasing more than 120 units, the parade features numerous bands, floats and numerous mobile and walking units. If you can’t make it to the parade on July 4, watch it live on Time Warner Channel 5. >> Here’s your guide to ALL THE FESTIVALS in Dayton this summer

5 insider tips (including parking) if you’re going to the Troy Strawberry Festival

 

It’s strawberry time!

Always held the first weekend in June, the Troy Strawberry Festival marks the beginning of the region’s summer food fests, and it’s a biggie, attracting up to 150,000. >> RELATED: 10 festivals we cannot wait for

Here are 5 things to know before you go:

 

1. About 200 vendors will be selling all sorts of goodies. You’ll find strawberry pie, of course, as well as shortcake, cheesecake, smoothies and chocolate-covered strawberries. But that’s only the beginning: the offerings include the exotic. Must-tries: Holy Cannoli, strawberry shortcake, strawberry salsa and strawberry pickles. Bring lots of cash. Booths will be located both downtown around the Public Square (be sure to check out the “strawberry fountain”) and on the river levee just a short walk down the Market Street bridge.

>> MORE: The brand new treat you must try at the Troy Strawberry Festival 

 

2. Strawberry donuts are the most popular item. Made by the Troy Music Boosters, the donuts are always a hot-seller at $10 a dozen. If you want donuts, go early and stock up; they freeze well. The donuts will be sold on the visitors side of Troy Memorial Stadium, located near the river levee. Grab a festival map at the info booths.

>> RELATED: 12 strawberry treats you must try at Troy Strawberry Festival

 

3. There will be more than strawberries to eat. Burgers, hot dogs, barbecue chicken and sandwiches, fish, sweet corn and other typical festival fare are also on the menu. The food booths at the festival are run by or in partnership with non-profits throughout Troy, so by eating these treats you are also supporting community groups. 

 

4. You’ll find plenty of non-food items for sale. If you love crafts and handmade goods, you will find TONS of booths with indoor and outdoor home decor, clothing for adults, children and even dolls, things for pets, candles and so much more. 

 

5. Parking. Where to park? Where to park? Festival organizers recommend taking the shuttles, which will run continuously both days of the festival from the following locations:

  • WACO Field, 1865 S. County Road 25-A, Troy. Take I-75 to Exit 69 and follow the signs).
  • The Miami County Fairgrounds, 650 N. County Road 25-A, Troy. Take I-75 to Exit 78 and follow the signs to the shuttles).
  • Hobart Corp./ITW Food Equipment, 701 South Ridge Ave., Troy. Take I-75 to Exit 73 and follow the signs to the shuttles.

The shuttles are free and will drop off near the courthouse. Shuttle hours are 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday and 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sunday.

WANT TO GO? 

What: Troy Strawberry Festival 

When: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, June 3; and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, June 4 

Where: Troy downtown and Great Miami River levee Admission: Free. Parking, shuttle service available (watch for signs). 

Festival location: Downtown Troy and the Great Miami River Levee, Troy. 

Cost: Free to attend. 

Insider’s tip: Take the shuttles and bring plenty of cash (There will be 6 ATM machines available: four downtown and two on the levee) 

More info: 937-339-7714 or www.gostrawberries.com 

Social media info: facebook.com/troystrawberryfestival, @troyberryfest on Twitter and Instagram. Share your photos using the hashtag #troyberryfest

>> WEATHER: WHIO’s 5-day forecast

>> BUCKET LIST: 50 things to do in Dayton this summer

 

     

Taste of Greene County crowns more than 30 winners

A little cold can't keep the foodies away.

Despite the weather, about 1,500 people attended the 19th Annual Taste of Greene County on Sunday, April 10, at Wright State's Nutter Center. The event showcased the culinary offerings of two dozen restaurants, bakers and caterers.

“We had a great variety of restaurants, and options of items to sample,” said Dawn Mader, operations manager for Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce. “In addition to the restaurants, we had great volunteers who helped make the event a success.”

The annual tasting provides an opportunity to sample items from local restaurants, and it gives restaurants an opportunity to try out new dishes.

Ele Cake Company debuted three new cakes, which they plan to offer in the future. The Holiday Inn in Fairborn won Best Entrée with Fish Tacos. “They have a newly renovated restaurant, and recently completed hotel renovations," Mader said.

Taste of Greene County was presented by the Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce, Greene Memorial Hospital, Soin Medical Center and Kosins Tents & Events.

Mader said the date for next year’s Taste of Greene County will be announced this summer.

Here are the winners of Sunday’s event:

Best Beverage: 1st place, Smoothie King; 2nd place, City Barbeque; 3rd place, McAlister's Deli 

Best Breakfast: 1st place, IHOP; 2nd place, Bob Evans; 3rd place, Mimi's Cafe

Best Appetizer: 1st place, Bar Louie; 2nd place, Giovanni's Fairborn; 3rd place, The Oilerie Dayton

Best Soup/Salad: 1st place, Packy's Sports Bar and Restaurant; 2nd place, Giovanni's Fairborn; 3rd place, Bravo Cucina Italiana

Best Sandwich: 1st place, Dibella's Subs; 2nd place, McAlister's Deli; 3rd place, City Barbeque 

Best International Cuisine: 1st place, Bravo Cucina Italiana; 2nd place, Giovanni's Fairborn; 3rd place, Jeet India Restaurant

Best Entree: 1st place, Holiday Inn Dayton Fairborn; 2nd place, bd's Mongolian Grill; 3rd place, Chicago Gyros and Dogs

Best Dessert: 1st place, Ele Cake Company; 2nd place; Cake, Hope, and Love; 3rd place, Giovanni's Fairborn

People's Choice: 1st place, Giovanni's Fairborn; tied for 2nd place, Bravo Cucina Italiana and McAlister's Deli 

Best Decorated Booth: 1st place- McAlister's Deli, City Barbeque, Cake, Hope, and Love

Sponsors Choice Award: City Barbeque

TomorrowWorld EDM festival brings nearly $100M to Georgia

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Among the parade of generic office parks lining Fulton Industrial Boulevard in Atlanta resides a unit stocked with contents that are anything but ordinary.

Painted fiberglass mushrooms the size of a Mazda lean against the floor. Candy cane-striped poles are tucked tightly together as if sharing bunk beds. Triple stacks of green and yellow picnic tables look like flattened turtles.

If Disney World and Home Depot mated, the result would look something like the innards of this 50,000-plus-square-foot warehouse housing a chunk of the decorations and supplies for TomorrowWorld.

The massive electronic dance music festival, which has boasted an annual parade of 300 DJs/producers including David Guetta, Afrojack and Steve Aoki, will be back in Georgia's Chattahoochee Hills Sept. 25-27 and is expected to bring another windfall of spending in the state.

Last year’s TomorrowWorld spurred $93.9 million in economic activity across Georgia, including $71.8 million in the Atlanta area, during the three-day event, according to a study paid for by the event’s producers.

The 2014 numbers represent an increase from the 2013 festival, which generated economic impact calculated at $85.1 million for Georgia, with $70 million of it in Atlanta and neighboring areas, according to an earlier study.

The average TomorrowWorld visitor stayed 3.5 days in the Atlanta area, indicating that attendees from all 50 states, as well as Canada, Mexico and Europe, are viewing the festival — a 21-and-older gathering — as a travel destination.

TomorrowWorld producers commissioned the economic impact report from Virginia-based research firm ICF International.

In 2013, the inaugural year that TomorrowWorld branched off from its parent festival in Belgium, TomorrowLand, which celebrates its 11th year in July, and staked out the 8,000 acres of farmland in south Fulton County, about 120,000 fans attended over the three-day period.

>> Read more trending stories

That fell short of the projected goal of 50,000 per day. But last year, the number bounced to 160,000 attendees for the duration of the festival, according to the report.

For 2015, organizers are optimistic about a 20 percent increase.

“We really want to become the pillar in the state of Georgia,” said Jamie Reilly, project director for TomorrowWorld and a decadelong veteran of Cirque du Soleil, while in the storage warehouse. “TomorrowWorld is not just a festival, it’s an experience and that’s what makes it so unique. We put the emphasis on the experience from the moment (attendees) buy a ticket to how they receive the ticket to how they camp with us.”

The land at Chattahoochee Hills — which TomorrowWorld has contracted for eight more years — can accommodate up to 200,000. But while a sell-out would be celebrated, producers are cautious about the growth rate.

“We want to ensure that we don’t compromise the fan experience due to the quantity of the people at the venue,” Reilly said.

This year’s festival, which will operate under the theme of “The Key to Happiness,” will feature more than 300 marquee names including Guetta, Tiësto, Steve Angello, Martin Garrix, Afrojack, Hardwell, Armin van Buuren, Adventure Club and Ferry Corsten.

TomorrowWorld will grow to nine stages in 2015 — an increase of one — including a live music stage. Last year’s popular “Atlanta Stage,” which spotlighted local acts, will return.

In a continued effort to infuse TomorrowWorld with local flavor to differentiate it from its counterparts in Belgium and the newest version of the festival in Brazil — which took place in May — organizers will hold a vendor fair as well as a job fair.

“TomorrowWorld is part of the TomorrowLand brand, and we now have three festivals yearly,” Reilly said. “But each has a unique taste to them, a unique lineup and differences and intricacies.”

Here are some other statistics from the economic growth report:

Gallery: Day of the Dead

'Sound City' red carpet, 03.13.13

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