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Bomb threat on Celtics’ plane was hoax

Members of the Boston Celtics got a scare Saturday when they were told of a bomb threat on their chartered flight to Oklahoma City, but it appears it was a hoax, several news outlets reported.

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The Celtics’ team plane landed safely in Oklahoma City on Saturday. A team spokesman said the Celtics became aware of the threat while the flight was airborne, ESPN reported. 

According to Tim Martin of WFXT, the plane made it to Oklahoma City as scheduled, with the FBI and local law enforcement looking into the threat. Martin also reported that a Celtics spokesman said there was no evidence of a bomb on the plane. 

The FBI's Oklahoma City field office said late Saturday that a thorough search of the aircraft "did not locate an explosive device" and that the agency is investigating the incident.

Celtics forward Jae Crowder posted a short video to his Instagram page showing police lights flashing next to the team plane with the caption, “Bomb threat on us.”

Crowder also tweeted about the incident, saying the team was fine.

The Celtics face the Thunder in Oklahoma City on Sunday night. Boston lost 101-94 at home Friday night to the Toronto Raptors. 

LeBron James wears Cubs uniform to pay off World Series bet

LeBron James didn’t like it, but a bet’s a bet. And when you lose a bet, you pay the winner.

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The Cleveland Cavaliers star made a bet with former Miami Heat teammate Dwyane Wade before the World Series. If the Cubs won, then James would have to wear a full Cubs uniform the next time the Cavaliers played in Chicago. 

The Cubs did indeed win the Series, earning their first championship in 108 years when they overcame a 3-1 deficit to rally past the Cleveland Indians.

So the payoff came Friday night, as James and the Cavaliers came to town to play the Chicago Bulls. James donned a Cubs jersey, pants and cap. No cleats, though.

“I’m not wearing cleats,” he had told reporters on Thursday. “No glove. Just the uniform.” 

As James walked through the arena before Friday night’s game, he was met by a gleeful Wade, who videotaped his rival. 

“My Indians gave everything they had,” James said in an earlier video posted on the Bleacher Report website. “But the Cubs came back, and, you know, they showed what true champions was all about. 

“Meanwhile, I’m pinstriped-up, walking into a nationally televised game in Chicago because of a bet I lost.” 

"It's a bet," James continued. "You have to fulfill your bet. Nothing more to it."

Cleveland’s luck against Chicago continued to sour, as the Cavaliers lost 111-105 despite James’ 27-point night. Wade helped Chicago to victory by scoring 24 points. 

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5 March Madness horror stories

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The National Collegiate Athletic Association’s annual men’s basketball tournament kicks off Tuesday. And while betting on brackets and watching the 68 teams whittle down to a Final Four can certainly prove entertaining, it’s not always just fun and games.

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Here are some March Madness nightmares to watch out for:

1. A $24,000 bracket bruising

Bryan Armen Graham entered a March Madness bracket pool run by a friend in his hometown for years. He told The Guardian that in 2008, the total pot reached enormous heights -- 48,800. The winner would take home half of that -- $24,400. 

When Graham and his significant other moved into first place with just the championship game left, another member of the pool called to make him an offer. He told Graham he’d be willing to split the winner’s $24, 000 if he took first (a Kansas victory) if Graham promised to do the same should Memphis take home the championship, cementing his bracket dominance.

But Graham didn’t take the deal and ended up dropping to 24th place, out of the money entirely after Kansas lost.

2. Fake Final Four tickets

One North Carolina woman found herself out $1,480 after purchasing a pair of phony NCAA Final Four tickets on Craigslist, Fox6Now reported in 2015. She wasn’t the only person to fall victim to that particular scammer, who was purportedly posing as a doctor based out of Milwaukee. The physician’s office told the Better Business Bureau it had received dozens of call that week from customers who had bought tickets that never actually surfaced.

Tickets scams, in general, are fairly common at major sporting events. To avoid them, the BBB recommends sticking to reliable sellers registered with the National Association of Ticket Brokers, checking a vendor’s guarantee policy and using a credit card, which offers better fraud protections than cash or debit cards.

3. Office pool leads to legal woes

John Bovery of New Jersey used to run an office pool at the Wall Street firm where he worked. It was the typical football squares, NCAA tourney brackets, etc. But his $837,000 purse with more than 8,000 entrants came crashing down in 2010 when cops started investigating an alleged mafia member with ties to the pool.

Participants in NCAA tournament pools are rarely prosecuted, but there’s a strong argument that these contests violate both federal and state laws, so it’s wise to keep that in mind as you fill out your bracket.

4. Gambling addiction

To some people, betting on brackets may feel like harmless fun. But others may find themselves fueling a gambling addiction. One former New York stockbroker outlined the scope of his March Madness woes to ESPN back in 2013.

His troubles included “tricking his parents into investing $30,000 into his ‘business,’ when the money really was going to bookies,” columnist Rick Reilly reported. The stockbroker ultimately got help after attending Gamblers Anonymous. Those similarly suffering from a gambling addiction can consider looking for a support group online.

5. The health impact

The first time Betsy Fisher filled out an NCAA tournament bracket was her last. She was elated when her teams were advancing, but when they started to lose, she went into a funk, finally deciding the whole experience is just bad for her health.

“Now the weekend. Games on all day long. I can’t watch. I can barely ask my husband about the games,” she wrote on her blog in 2012. “I’m depressed that I’m not going to WIN. By the end of Sunday, I make a pan of brownies. Not only do I lick the bowl. I eat 3 before they have even cooled and eat another for good measure before bed.”

Other things to look out for:

Your boss knows you're watching games at work.

Many March Madness games happen during the day (it would take quite a while to air the whole tournament if every game was in prime time). For many college hoops fanatics, this leads to a conundrum -- miss a game or watch at work?

Companies aren’t totally clueless that this is happening, as people have reported about company-wide emails warning people about Internet connection issues due to too many people tuning in on their PCs. If you’re going to watch, tread lightly. You don’t want to get fired for watching a first round match-up.

No one is getting anything done. 

As a worker, you might not care about the occasional day where you don’t get much done, but your boss probably does. If you’re a business owner, March Madness can be downright disastrous. For several years, experts have estimated companies lose well over $1 billion to lack of productivity during March Madness, as employees fill out brackets and stream the games. Last year, job-placement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas estimated losses would reach $1.9 billion.

A love of basketball could get you hacked. 

Cyber criminals know you’re going to start searching the Internet for bracket-building tools and information about the best teams, so they build malware around popular search terms, according to security site PC World. Just because something comes up in your search results doesn’t mean you should click on it -- don’t open attachments or links from sites or email addresses you don’t recognize, even if they’re related to your favorite team.

A ticket but nowhere to sleep.

There’s nothing more exciting than your team making its way through the tournament, especially if they end up in the Final Four or championship game. Why not celebrate with a spur-of-the-moment trip to the finals? Sure, it’ll be expensive, but you might be able to find a good deal. Be careful, though -- it’s not unheard of for people to lose money to a fake hotel offer during a major sporting event.

The BBB suggests asking for the name, address and phone number of a hotel in any offer you are considering and calling directly to verify that the room exists. You should also “check the hotel’s website or a reputable travel site to be sure that the location is convenient for getting to and from the arena,” it said.

Your ex could use March Madness against you in court.

When you’re in the middle of a divorce, nothing is off the table. As one North Carolina law firm highlighted on its site, excess drinking and gambling during March Madness and St. Patrick’s Day -- which falls in the middle of the tournament this year -- could be used in court to affect alimony payments.

New England high school welcomes 3-foot, 5-inch tall basketball player

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A determined teen isn't letting his height prevent him from hitting the court at Hillsboro-Deering High School in Hillsboro, New Hampshire.

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Tristan Wilmott, 14, was diagnosed with mulibrey nanism when he was 4 years old. The rare genetic disorder causes significant growth failures. Wilmott stands at 3 feet 5 inches tall, weighs 42 pounds and wears a size 1 shoe.

This year, the freshman joined the high school's junior varsity team.

What he lacks in height, Wilmott's teammates said he makes up for in spirit, the Union Leader reported.

“He definitely raises the spirits of everybody on the team,” said coach Andrew Jones. "He’s been in games where we’ve been down by a lot, and then at the end Tristan goes out and everyone on the bench is cheering and he’s taking shots and they’re hoping they go in, and it’s just an explosion when he does make it. A lot of teams, when they’re down by that much, no one cares anymore and they’re just waiting for the clock to run out.”

The team has yet to win a game this season, but it's not over  yet. Good luck, Hillcats!

Read more about Wilmott here.

What he lacks in height, he makes up for in spirit -- best of luck to Tristan & the Hillsboro-Deering Hillcats!Posted by FOX25 News on Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Dayton vs. St. Bonaventure

Cincinnati media reports Lauren Hill has died

Our partners at WCPO and multiple media outlets around the region are reporting that Lauren Hill, the 19-year-old freshman who battled brain cancer, has died.

>>> More on her passing and the life of Lauren Hill

Dayton advances over Boise St.

Tune in to WHIO Radio for today's UD A-10 tourney game

The next University of Dayton men's basketball game in the 2014 Atlantic 10 Conference tournament will be broadcast this afternoon on WHIO Radio.

Dayton, seeded fifth in this year's tournament, beat No. 13-seed Fordham University Thursday, 87-74. The win set up a Friday afternoon quarterfinal game against No. 4-seed St. Joseph's University at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.

WHIO will pre-empt the final hour of the Rush Limbaugh Show and a portion of the Sean Hannity show to air the UD Flyers game. The Voice of the Flyers, Larry Hansgen, and Bucky Bockhorn will be court side, and you can hear every call on WHIO Radio.

The Bud Light Pre-Game Show begins at 2 p.m., with tip-off scheduled for 2:30 p.m.

We've got everything you need to know to stay on top of today's game:

Preview the game with our complete coverage:

Still want more?

Complete UD Flyers basketball coverage »

WHIO Radio to air UD A-10 tourney game today

WHIO Radio has a programming change for this afternoon.

As the radio home of University of Dayton sports, WHIO will pre-empt the final hour of the Rush Limbaugh Show and a portion of the Sean Hannity show to air the UD Flyers game against Fordham.

The Flyers will work to keep a spot in the NCAA tournament alive with a win against the No. 13 seed Fordham. Dayton is seeded fifth in the tournament.

The Bud Light Pre-Game Show with Larry Hansgen and Buckey Bockhorn begins at 2 p.m. with tipoff at 2:30 p.m. on WHIO Radio.

We've got everything you need to know to stay on top of today's game:

Preview the game with our complete coverage:

Still want more?

Complete UD Flyers basketball coverage »

 

 

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