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Beachgoers warned after creepy looking fish appears in Virginia Beach

Visitors planning to stop at Virginia Beach are being warned to be on the lookout for a decidedly strange looking fish recently spotted near the shoreline.

>> Read more trending stories

Organizers with the East Coast Surfing Championships, or ECSC, shared a photo last week of the fish, a northern stargazer, popping its head up from the sand.

"A friend of ECSC came across this stargazer while walking in Virginia Beach," organizers said in a Facebook post. "They do not pose any real threat to humans, but they sure look menacing."

Check this out. A friend of ECSC came across this Stargazer while walking in Virginia Beach (note: these animals tend to...Posted by East Coast Surfing Championships on Saturday, July 2, 2016

According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, the fish typically makes its home in the deep, open waters of lower Chesapeake Bay. It can grow up to 22 inches in length but typically only grow to between eight and 18 inches.

Northern stargazers eat small fish and crustaceans and hunt by burying themselves in sand, with only their eyes and mouth above ground.

"Watch your step," ECSC organizers wrote on Facebook.

Marathon runner plays dead to end bear attack in Valles Caldera National Preserve

A marathon runner was afraid she would die when she came face to face Saturday with an angry mother bear during a marathon race through New Mexico's Valles Caldera National Preserve, near Los Alamos.

>> Read more trending stories

The woman was taking part in the annual Valles Caldera Runs when she met the bear and her two cubs after cresting a hill in Redondo Meadows. She shared her story in a post on the Runs' Facebook page.

By the time Karen Williams spotted her, the bear was only 15 feet away, Williams wrote. The bear knocked Williams down, raked Williams with her claws and bit her.

"I cried out in pain and mama bear did not like that, so she hit me with a left hook and bit my neck and started to try to shake me," she wrote. "I rolled into a ball and played dead."

She lay in the meadow, afraid to move, as the bear went to a nearby tree and huffed at one of her cubs, who had been scared by Williams and took shelter in the branches of the tree.

>> Related: Must-see: Bear roams Tampa neighborhood, hangs out in tree

"Mama bear kept glancing my way to make sure that I was still 'dead,'" Williams wrote. "I was at that point afraid I might die."

Williams wasn't sure of the extent of her injuries. She waited until the sounds of the bear and her cubs faded into silence before she attempted to look around.

"(I) was having trouble seeing much," she wrote. "I tried to sit up but (I) was nauseated and my arms didn't seem to work right."

She said another runner came upon her about a half-hour after the attack and she was able to get help.

>> Related: Watch: Family panics when bear opens car door near Yellowstone

"There are dozens of other people that helped me and I appreciate them all," she wrote. "Thank you."

She suffered multiple serious injuries, but none of them appeared to be life-threatening. Medics airlifted her to an Albuquerque area hospital for treatment.

"I am alive," Williams wrote. "Unfortunately, the bear is not."

Officials with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish expressed regret Sunday over having to kill the bear, which was tracked by conservation officers and found near the attack site. However, New Mexico law requires that "any wild animal that attacks or bites a human be euthanized and tested for rabies."

>> Related: Woman stalked by wolf for 12 hours, saved by bear

The bear had been part of a study involving wild bears, according to the Department of Game and Fish, and was wearing a GPS collar. The collar helped authorities confirm that the bear that was euthanized was the one responsible for Williams' injuries.

"We are thankful that the injuries sustained by the victim were not worse and are hopeful that she is able to recover quickly," said Alexandra Sandoval, director of the state's Department of Game and Fish.

Conservation officers said they were unable to capture the bear's three cubs on Sunday. Officers said they would continue efforts to catch the young cubs, who they plan to send to the New Mexico Wildlife Center in Espanola for care.

When it comes to insect repellent, natural isn't always better

To prevent mosquito bites and lessen the risk of catching the Zika virus, more than half of Americans plan to purchase an insect repellent this year. 

>> Read more trending stories  

The World Health Organization says the best way to prevent Zika is to not get bitten by mosquitoes infected with the virus, but Consumer Reports said just any insect repellent won't do the trick. 

The most important thing to know from this latest round of testing? Natural isn't always better. 

Consumer Reports looked at six natural repellents -- meaning the active ingredients are derived from plants instead of chemicals -- and found that five of them only protected the wearer against mosquitoes for an hour at the most. 

But one natural repellent, Repel Lemon Eucalyptus, was found to give at least seven hours of protection against Aedes mosquitoes, which are known to carry Zika. 

Out of all 16 repellents Consumer Reports tested -- both chemical- and natural-based -- two synthetic products -- Ben’s Tick and Insect Repellent and Sawyer's Premium Picaridin Insect Repellent -- ward off Aedes mosquitoes the longest with just one application. 

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said active ingredients like DEET, picaridin and oil of lemon eucalyptus "typically provide reasonably long-lasting protection."

Health officials do say that while oil of eucalyptus products shouldn't be used on children younger than age 3, all three of the most effective active ingredients can be used by pregnant women. 

Back in April, the CDC released a map showing that mosquitoes known to carry Zika could soon be found across the lower half of the U.S.

Vanessa Hudgens fined for vandalizing national forest

While on a romantic getaway for Valentine's Day, Vanessa Hudgens and her boyfriend, Austin Butler, carved their names into a red rock wall in Arizona.

The only problem? Defacing the property in the Sedona, Arizona's Coconino National Forest is illegal.

>> Read more trending stories

Hudgens posted a photo on Instagram of the carving, which had her and her boyfriend's names surrounded by a heart. The image has since been removed, but not before authorities saw it.

She received a citation for the misdemeanor count of damaging a natural feature on U.S. Forest Service land and paid a $1,000 fine. The fee will help volunteers restore the rock by scrubbing and sanding it down, according to The Associated Press.

Coconino National Forest Service spokesman Brady Smith said that officials rarely find out who carves their names into the rocks but given that Hudgens is a celebrity and she posted the photo on Instagram

"She was caught in the act because she publicized it and she's famous," Smith told Page Six. "I'm sure there are others who are not famous and publicized it and we've never known."

Watch: Crews monitoring growing wildfire in Washington

Officials with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources said crews have been sent to a growing wildfire Thursday night near the Oso-Arlington area.

>> Read more trending stories

The fire is off Highway 530 and it started at about 6 p.m.

According to fire officials, there was a logging operation earlier in the day and something started the fire. They said they were not sure of its cause.

Officials with DNR said the fire is named "Hotshot" and it is burning about 55 acres.

According to officials, they're planning on letting the fire burn for tonight and will keep an eye on it. They plan to put it out Friday.

No injuries have been reported.

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Close to 90,000 gallons of crude oil spilled into the Gulf Of Mexico

The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement says 2,100 barrels of oil have spilled into the Gulf of Mexico.

>> Read more trending stories

The BSEE says Shell Offshore Inc. reported a sheen near four of its wells, about 100 miles off the coast of Louisiana.

An underwater pipe system flowing to Shell's Brutus oil platform leaked almost 90,000 gallons of crude oil.

The BSEE is still investigating the spill but says there have been no injuries or evacuations.

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Earthquake swarm detected beneath Mount St. Helens

Magma stores are recharging inside Mount St. Helens, setting off a swarm of small earthquakes since last month, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Since the catastrophic eruption of May 18, 1980, scientists have been conducting research and collecting data on the volcano to learn more about its typical behavior.

Since March 14, a number of small earthquakes have occurred beneath the volcano at a depth between 1.2 to 4 miles. The earthquakes have low magnitudes of 0.5 or less, with the largest a 1.3.

Over the last eight weeks, there have been more than 130 earthquakes located by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and many more that are too small to be detected.

The USGS says the earthquake rates have been steadily increasing since March, reaching nearly 40 located earthquakes per week, but there are no signs of an imminent eruption.

The quakes are too small to be felt, even if you were standing on the surface directly above.

"The earthquakes are volcano-tectonic in nature, indicative of a slip on a small fault," according to the USGS. "Such events are commonly seen in active hydrothermal and magmatic systems. The magma chamber is likely imparting its own stresses on the crust around and above it, as the system slowly recharges. The stress drives fluids through cracks, producing the small quakes. The current pattern of seismicity is similar to swarms seen at Mount St. Helens in 2013 and 2014; recharge swarms in the 1990s had much higher earthquake rates and energy release."

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No anomalous gases, increases in ground inflation or shallow seismicity have been detected with the swarm, and there are no signs of an imminent eruption.

As was seen at Mount St. Helens between 1987 and 2004, recharge can continue for many years beneath a volcano without an eruption.

What to do if you're bitten by a snake

Many states are  full of great trails and paths to hike and run. But those same trails and paths are homes to critters, both docile and dangerous. And that includes snakes.

With so many places for them to hide, it is unlikely you will be bitten by one, but every runner and hiker should be aware of the dangers and know what to do in the event being on the wrong end of a bite. 

Think you've been bitten by a snake?

Don't worry about catching it, applying a tourniquet or heroically cutting the wound to extract the venom, says Dr. Gaylord Lopez, director of the Georgia Poison Center based in Atlanta.

>> Read more trending stories  

Instead, reach for the most important first-line antidote to snake bites: your car keys.

"It's most important to get a snake bite victim to the hospital," said Lopez. Medical professionals will address three areas of potential snake bite harm: local tissue injury and pain, heart issues and bleeding from the wound and bleeding complications.

Another very important tip: call 911 or poison control right away. Keep the national Poison Control Center number (1-800-222-1222) programmed into your phone and written out somewhere you can easily see it at your house or in your car. The people that answer there will have immediate advice and can also steer you to the nearest poison control center in the area if you get bitten.

Other important steps to take if you or your child have been bitten by a snake, according to the Center for Disease Control's national emergency website and the GPCC:

* If you don't have immediate transportation to the hospital, while waiting for 911 response keep the patient calm and immobile, preferably lying down

* Until you reach medical help, keep the affected limb at an even level with the rest of the body.

* Do not give the patient food, drink, or medication -including pain medications, aspirin, alcohol and so forth. Much of the advice for snake bite treatments may go against what you've always heard or assumed, especially if you've watched a lot of Westerns or are thinking of standard treatments for other medical emergencies.

A few surprising snakebite don'ts:

* Do not use a tourniquet.

* Do not cut the wound.

* Do not try to suck out the venom.

* Do not pack the wound in ice.

If you are absolutely certain the bite came from a non-venomous snake, wash it with warm soapy water anyhow and seek immediate medical care. You may need a tetanus shot and you're still very susceptible to infection.

As for identifying the snake that bit you, the recommended strategy there is counter intuitive, too. First and foremost, do not try to catch the snake, said Lopez. "We do not want you to bring it to the poison control center, dead or alive!"

A second interaction with the snake may slow down your ability to get medical attention and it definitely puts you at risk for a second bite. And never make assumptions about which snake bit you if you didn't see it -- or even if you think you had a clear look, said Lopez. "We get people that say, 'Yes, I was bitten, but we only have rat snakes and garters around here. If you make assumptions, you may end up as a statistic."

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