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Cucamelon: 5 things to know about the cute fruit

A little-known fruit is making headlines this summer for its big flavor.

Here's what you need to know about cucamelons:

1. What is a cucamelon? According to the Huffington Post, the cucamelon is a fruit that looks like a tiny watermelon but tastes more like a lime-dipped cucumber. It's also known as Mexican sour gherkin, Mexican miniature watermelon, Mexican sour cucumber and mouse melon, BuzzFeed reports.

2. Where do cucamelons grow? Cucamelons originated in Mexico and Central America, BuzzFeed reports. The fruit, which is about the size of a grape, grows on a vine.

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3. Where can I get them? They are sold at some farmer's markets, but your best bet is to grow them yourself, the Huffington Post reports. You can buy seeds online here.

4. How do I grow them? According to Home-Grown Revolution, you should "sow the seed from April to May indoors and plant out when all risk of frost is over." The vine will also need a support or trellis to grown on, SF Gate reports. Learn more here or here.

5. What's the best way to eat them? The Huffington Post recommends eating cucamelons straight from the vine, adding them to salads, pickling them or using them to garnish cocktails.

Billions of cicadas to ascend in Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania

Video includes clips from Brandon Baker / CC BY 3.0, The BBC and Rich4098 / CC BY 3.0 and images from Natalia Wilson / CC BY SA 2.0, Nick Harris / CC BY ND 2.0, Gramody / CC BY SA 2.0 and Meredith Harris / CC BY ND 2.0.

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Next month, parts of the U.S. can expect to see and hear lots of 17-year-old cicadas, which will rise from the ground to mate.

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The insects, which have spent the rest of their lives underground, only live above ground for about six weeks. The adults, the ones that make all the noise, only ascend above ground to reproduce.

Males use the harsh sound to look for females so they can mate in that brief time. The sound can reach over 90 decibels in some instances; that's about the same volume as a lawn mower.

The female cicadas will lay eggs in a tree, and after the eggs hatch, the newborn cicadas -- called nymphs -- will bury themselves in the ground, where they'll develop for 17 years. 

According to The Washington Post, female cicadas can lay up to 400 eggs each, across 40 to 50 sites.

During the upcoming mating season, there could be as many as 1.5 million cicadas per acre in some places.

The noise, which is mostly a daytime phenomenon, will probably last until mid- to late June, by which time most of the cicadas will probably die, according to Gaye Williams, a Maryland Department of Agriculture entomologist. Williams said predicting exactly when the emergence will end is tough because it depends on many variables, including temperature, moisture and humidity. 

The good news is that cicadas can’t chew, so they don’t devour plants and trees. Plus, they don’t bite or sting.

But if you live in Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania and other neighboring states, now might be the time to invest in some ear plugs.

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Dinosaurs among us? Couple's Jurassic yard art may be headed for extinction

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Dinosaurs have been spotted in a Texas neighborhood – sort of.

According to Houston's KTRK, Nancy Hentschel and her husband recently revamped their front lawn in Sugar Land's New Territory neighborhood with yard art of Jurassic proportions – huge metal sculptures of a Tyrannosaurus rex and velociraptor. 

"Obviously, it does make a little bit of a statement," Hentschel told KTRK. "And I've met more neighbors in the past 24 hours than I have in the 17 years we've lived here."

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But the local homeowners' association seems to have other ideas, asking Hentschel what her future plans are for the display.

"My plans are directly tied to their plans," she told KTRK.

post on the neighborhood's Facebook page points out that the dinos are "in violation of the deed restrictions" but concedes that "they are kind of cool." 

"Kudos to the resident for even thinking of this one," the post reads.

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Take a drive down Kendall Creek in Lakewind to take a look at this Jurassic Yard before the NTRCA succeeds in having the...Posted by New Territory on Monday, August 24, 2015

Blooming flowers captured in time lapse video

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Spanish photographer David de los Santos Gil has once again captured the beauty of nature on film.

Last year, Gil compiled 5,000 images of blooming flowers for the first timelapse video in a series that received recognition from National Geographic, among others.

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Now the photographer has released "Flowers Opening Timelapse II," for which he took nearly 40,000 images. (He shot 50,000 photos in 1 to 10 minute intervals for the first video, he says on his blog.)

The second video again features a score composed by Roger Subirana, Gil says on his blog.

Some of the flowers seen in the video are hibiscus, cactus, iris and almond blossom, though there are many more as well.

6 green ways to cool down your home

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