Now Playing
On Air
No Program
Now Playing


200 items
Results 61 - 70 of 200 < previous next >

Woman’s $12,000 bee sting bill shows how high emergency room costs have climbed

How can a two-hour treatment for a bee sting end up costing a patient $12,000? Prices can soar when the patient goes through a barrage of tests and insurance doesn’t cover the bill, but Sylvia Rosas’ case is shining a light on the cost of health care in the country.

It all started with a simple bee sting in her yard in Florida. Rosas had allergic reactions to stings in the past, but didn’t have an EpiPen, so she went to the emergency room, CNN Money reported. Several doctors looked at her sting and ordered blood tests and an EKG to ensure she wouldn’t have a reaction. The visit, which took less than two hours, happened to be at an out-of-network hospital, so her insurance wouldn’t cover it. Rosas had to pay the bill out of pocket.

Now, she’s second-guessing when she needs to see a doctor so she won’t wind up with the bill later.

>> Read more trending news 

Rick Brown found himself in a similar financial situation, CNN Money reported.

He twisted his ankle. After trying to treat it at home to no avail, he went to his local emergency room, on his own crutches, and was seen by a physician assistant. Brown had an X-ray done on him and was given a splint and a prescription, with a suggestion to see a specialist for the fracture. 

He was billed $2,600 for the ER visit. Then, he received a separate bill for $5,700 from the doctor’s office. Insurance paid half of the ER bill, but denied the doctor’s charges because the person who saw him was out-of-network.

Brown said that if he would have known that the bill wouldn’t be covered, he would have waited a few days longer to see someone else.

Officials with the Health Care Cost Institute say ER visits cost an average of $1,917 in 2016. That’s more than 31 percent higher than it did four years before.

The amount billed by the hospital usually covers the facility fee and some tests and services, CNN Money reported. But it usually doesn’t include the cost patients incur for actually seeing a doctor, which is usually billed separately.

The big question is: Why does it cost so much?

Emergency rooms are seeing more patients, and those patients have severe medical problems.

People with cuts and fevers will more likely go to urgent care locations. Patients with chest pain and those suffering from asthma attacks are seen in emergency rooms, and those conditions are more expensive to treat, CNN Money reported.

Emergency rooms also have access to expensive equipment, like CT scans and MRIs.

So where does that leave patients who need care, but don’t want to gamble with their finances?

First, experts told CNN Money that patients don’t need to sign paperwork with the ER that promises to pay in full just to be seen. Federal law says ERs have to screen and stabilize anyone who comes in.

Second, if you’re stuck with a bill, speak with the health care providers. Prices can be negotiable, CNN Money reported. A professor of surgery and health policy at Johns Hopkins University found that hospitals mark up some services as much as 340 percent more than Medicare allowances.

“Prices are highly fluctuant and often negotiable,” Martin Makary told CNN Money. “As with new cars, people are not expected to pay the sticker price.” 

Man accused of making SXSW bomb threat vowed to 'watch everyone die,' affidavit says

A man accused of threatening to bomb The Roots’ show during South by Southwest last weekend told a producer via email that he would “watch everyone die,” according to court documents.

>> Read more trending news

Trevor Weldon Ingram, 26, faces a charge of a making a terroristic threat, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

An arrest affidavit made public on Monday said the producer called police after receiving two emails from a Gmail account belonging to “t9ingram” just after 3 p.m. Saturday.

The first email said, “(Expletive) u I’m gonna pant a bomb and watch everyone die,” misspelling the word “plant.”

The second email said only “BOMB,” the affidavit said.

Austin police sent its bomb squad out to the Fair Market Venue, where the concert was scheduled, and used bomb-sniffing dogs to sweep the area. Neither Austin police dogs or Travis County Sheriff’s Office dogs found any sign of an explosive device.

>> Related: Man held in SXSW threat ruled out as bomb suspect, police say

Still, event promoters canceled the event, saying it was done out of an abundance of caution.

Investigators searched the Texas Department of Public Safety’s driver’s license database and identified Ingram as the suspect.

>> Related: The Roots' SXSW show canceled after bomb threat; man arrested

He was the registered account holder of the Gmail account and had already been investigated by Austin police in February for making threats against eBay employees from the same email address, according to authorities.

The threats began on Feb. 16 and included messages like “I hope you die in a horrible car crash,” “(Expletive) you. You will die slow,” and “I have 10k on everyone’s head in the Austin office,” the affidavit said.

Austin bombings: What we know about the bomber’s habits

Police and federal agents continue to investigate the four bomb explosions in Austin this month that killed two people and wounded four others.At a press conference Monday, after the fourth bomb exploded injuring two men, law enforcement authorities asked the bomber to contact them and let them know what message he is trying to send, assuring him that they are “listening.”

>> Read more trending news

The bombings began March 2 when a package exploded on the front porch of the home of Anthony Stephan House, 39, killing him. The second attack happened March 12 when a bomb in a package was taken into the home of Draylen Mason, 17. The package exploded, killing Mason, and injuring his mother.

>>Austin package bombings: Friends remember victims Draylen Mason, Anthony House

The third bomb exploded when a 75-year-old Hispanic woman picked up a package on her front porch. She was seriously injured.On Sunday, two men were hurt when a bomb went offapparently after one of the two hit a tripwire attached to the explosive device.

>>For investigators, a race to decode hidden message in Austin bombings 

Authorities are operating under the assumption that the bombs were made by the same person.

Here is what we know about the Austin bomber’s habits: 

  • Prior to the explosion Sunday, the three bombs were left in packages at homes.
  • Sunday’s bomb was tripwire-activated.
  • Sunday’s bomb was in a different geographical area than the other three bombs.
  • The victims of the first three bombings were African-American and Hispanic. Sunday night’s victims were white.
  • Fred Burton, a security and terrorism analyst at Austin-based Stratfor, told the Austin American-Statesman that he believes it is the same person doing the bombing. He may have changed bombing locations and methods to throw investigators off, Burton said.
  • Common household items were used to construct the first three bombs, the American-Statesman reported. 

Photos: Official state dogs

Actress Cynthia Nixon announces run for governor of New York

Actress Cynthia Nixon, best known for her portrayal of Miranda Hobbes in HBO's "Sex and the City," announced Monday on Twitter that she's running for governor of New York.

>> Read more trending news

Unabomber: TV shows, movies and books about Ted Kaczynski

More than 20 years after FBI agents arrested Theodore J. Kaczynski at his Lincoln, Montana, cabin, the man known as the “Unabomber” continues to fascinate true crime fans.

>> Read more trending news 

Kaczynski, known as the Unabomber, was blamed for three deaths and 23 injuries when he mailed 16 bombs to universities and airlines over the course of 17 years from 1978-1995. 

In June 1995, he sent his manifesto to The New York Times and The Washington Post, saying he would stop the bombings if it was published. The Washington Post published the 35,000-word manifesto on Sept. 22, 1995. 

Here are a few iterations of coverage of the Unabomber.

“Unabomber: The True Story”

In 1996 “Unabomber: The True Story” aired on USA Network. The TV film starred Tobin Bell as Kaczynski. 

The movie is not available for streaming and can only be watched on DVD or Amazon Video.

“Every Last Tie: The Story of the Unabomber and His Family”

In 2016, David Kaczynski, the younger brother of Ted Kaczynski, published a memoir in which he recounted growing up with the person who became the Unabomber and ultimately turning him in. In the book, David Kaczynski says that his wife, Linda Patrik, was the one who first became suspicious that her brother-in-law was the Unabomber. 

>>Read the latest coverage of the bombings in Austin here

Of the book, David Kacynzki told The Guardian, “It doesn’t have any kind of thesis or analysis of how my brother transformed. It’s more of a meditation on the mystery of how that can happen.”

“Every Last Tie” can be purchased on Amazon.

“Manhunt: Unabomber”

Discovery released the limited series “Manhunt: Unabomber” in 2017.

The eight-part series attempts to explain why Ted Kaczynski, a mathematician, began a letter bomb campaign. The Unabomber is played by Paul Bettany. Mark Duplass plays David Kaczynski.

“This is a guy who mails bombs to people he’s never met,” series co-writer and executive producers Andrew Sodroski said of the series. “At the same time he’s a victim too. He was a little boy with a bright future ahead of him, and then something happened.”

The series can be watched on NetflixAmazon Prime Video and on Blu-ray and DVD.

>> READ MORE: Photos: Austin police investigate explosionsFor investigators, a race to decode hidden message in Austin bombingsMap shows location of 4 Austin bombsAustin explosions: 2 men hurt in fourth blast this monthOfficials increase reward to $115,000 for information on Austin bombingsMan held in SXSW threat ruled out as bomb suspect, police sayAustin package explosions: 3 blasts appear connected, claim 2 lives, police sayThe Roots' SXSW show canceled after bomb threat; man arrestedAustin package bombings: Friends remember victims Draylen Mason, Anthony HouseMORE

Common Traits Of A Serial Bomber

Common Traits Of A Serial Bomber

Self-driving Uber car hits, kills Arizona pedestrian

A self-driving Uber vehicle in Arizona was involved in a crash that killed a woman early Monday, KNXV reported.

>> Read more trending news

The vehicle struck 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg while she was walking outside of a crosswalk, Tempe police said in a statement. Police said the vehicle was in autonomous mode at the time of the crash, and a vehicle operator also was behind the wheel.

Herzberg was taken to a hospital and died of her injuries, KNXV reported. 

>> Uber pauses service in Pittsburgh

It is believed to be the first fatal accident involving an autonomous vehicle, several sources reported.

An Uber spokesman told KNXV the company was aware of the incident and is cooperating with authorities. Liliana Duran, a Tempe police spokeswoman, said in an emailed statement to Bloomberg that “Uber is assisting and this is still an active investigation." 

The company said it has suspended testing of its self-driving cars in Tempe, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Toronto, The New York Times reported.

WATCH: Roadrunner, snake battle in the desert

If you grew up believing a roadrunner was a lovable character that dominated Saturday morning cartoons, think again.

>> Read more trending news

A video documents a fierce battle between a roadrunner and a snake at Agua Caliente County Park in southern California.

Spoiler alert: the roadrunner wins with a forceful and clever strategy.

Meep! Meep! Indeed.

200 items
Results 61 - 70 of 200 < previous next >