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VIDEO: Dayton gym teacher drags kindergartner across floor

Video of a Dayton Public Schools teacher who reportedly “grabbed a student by the wrist during gym class at Rosa Parks Early Learning Center, twisted his arm, and dragged him across the gym floor” was obtained Tuesday by the Dayton Daily News and WHIO.

MORE: Dayton teacher fired for ‘dragging’ kindergartner across gym

David Cameron was accused of dragging the kindergarten boy “on or about” Nov. 28, 2016, according to a March 15 letter DPS Treasurer Hiwot Abraha wrote Cameron detailing the specifications of the grounds for termination.

The school board approved a resolution to terminate Cameron during a meeting in August.

The Dayton Daily News and WHIO obtained the letter and video using Ohio’s public records laws.

MORE: DPS lowers GPA for sports eligibility, adds mandatory tutoring

“The kindergarten student expressed that you were hurting him, yet you did not release him,” the letter states. “On Feb, 23, 2017, you were present at an administrative hearing regarding the charges and specifications surrounding this matter. It was noted in the hearing that you have been counseled previously regarding appropriate student disciplinary procedures.”

Cameron initially requested a hearing before a referee appointed by the Ohio Department of Education, according to the resolution from the meeting. But the document says Cameron “withdrew his request and waived any right to a hearing” before the Aug. 2 meeting.

Cameron was placed on leave for several months after the incident.

MORE: U.S. News 2018 Best Colleges: Area schools make the list

Springboro council OKs $380 million Austin South deal

The Springboro City Council gave the green light Thursday on development of the $380 million Austin South Springboro.

The council voted after developer Larry Dillin unveiled the project publicly for the first time.

With two members absent, the council approved a resolution 5-0 authorizing City Manager Christine Thompson to sign the development agreement with Dillin’s companies.

Those companies are VisCap - the company under which Dillin is developing and leasing on both sides of Austin Boulevard since taking over for developer Randy Gunlock and RG Properties - and Springboro Landing Associates - the company owning the 63.7 acres in Springboro city limits and 3.5 acres in Miami Twp.

“This is a wonderful thing for Springboro,” Mayor John Agenbroad said.

RELATED: Springboro ready to approve Austin South development

Now the city and Dillin’s companies begin a contingency period of 90 to 180 days expected to lead to arrangement of financing for the project. Annexation of the Miami Twp. land into Springboro is among the contingencies.

By late spring 2018, the project could be breaking ground.

It comes as Dillin concludes work at Austin Landing, a mixed-used development at Austin Boulevard across from the new project site along Interstate 75.

RELATED: Austin South could spur $350 million in development

Springboro is to finance more than $32 million to pay for roads and other infrastructure.

Dillin, his investors and the companies moving to the development are expected to put in as much as $350 million, according to the development agreement released this week.

Upscale senior and multi-family housing, a hotel and retail are among the uses anticipated in the first phase of the 67-acre development on the southeast corner of Interstate 75 and Austin Boulevard, in Springboro and Miami Twp.

RELATED: Council traveled 2.5 hours for meeting at Levis Commons

Dillin and the city reached agreement after setting aside terms of a settlement reached by the city and the prior developer, R.G. Properties, in a lawsuit about plans to build a WalMart there.

RELATED: Springboro ready to negotiate on property across from Austin Landing

The development agreement sets a schedule of payments to Miamisburg City Schools, starting in 2021. Payments of more than $3 million would be in lieu of taxes on the improvements that are to be diverted through tax incremental financing to help pay for the development.

The development is to be accessed off Austin Boulevard by an entrance across from one leading into Austin Landing and allowing no left turns for westbound motorists. A full entrance would be built off 741, Main Street in Springboro.

Dillin is also expected to be involved in redevelopment of Springboro’s central crossroads, Main Street and Central Avenue, Ohio 73 in Springboro.

RELATED: Architect hired to redesign former Springboro IGA shopping center site 

Children find Spirit Airlines pilot, wife dead in apparent overdose

Four children found their parents – including their airline pilot father – dead Thursday in their Centerville, Ohio, home in what investigators said appears to be the latest incident in a scourge of drug deaths plaguing Montgomery County and Ohio.

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The husband, Brian Halye, was an active pilot for Spirit Airlines, flying for them nine years, and captaining a passenger jet as recently as last Friday.

He and his wife, Courtney Halye, were found in a bedroom of their home on East Von Dette Circle, a suburban cul-de-sac.

RELATED: Centerville pilot, wife deaths may be fentanyl-related

The deaths appear “drug related due to paraphernalia found at the scene,” Centerville Police Officer John Davis said. Ken Betz, director of the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office, said the incident resembles other opioid cases and “could be consistent with what we’re seeing with fentanyl products in our community.”

“We’ve been talking about this for how long now?” Betz said by phone. “Here I go again … year-to-date, accidental drug overdoses exceeded 160 already this year.”

Official causes of death for the couple have not been released, as a full medical exam will be performed today.

‘They were very cold’

The couple each had two children from previous marriages. In two 911 calls to Centerville police shortly before 8 a.m., the children ages 9 to 13 told dispatchers their parents are on the floor and “not waking up.”

“They were very cold,” said the oldest child, politely answering “yes, ma’am” to the dispatcher as his sisters cried in the background.

The children ran outside the home to relatives as police conducted an investigation. By 10:30, police and emergency response vehicles cleared the usually tranquil neighborhood.

The Halyes purchased their home in summer 2013. The neighborhood, Pellbrook Farm, is just southwest of the Ohio 725-Wilmington Pike intersection. The quiet suburban cul-de-sac features homes valued around $150,000 to $225,000.

Warren County Court records show Brian Halye was divorced in 2011 in a shared parenting case. Courtney Halye was convicted of a felony drug possession charge in 2009, but the case was expunged. Her previous husband Jacob Castor, the father of two of the children, died in 2007 at age 27.

Neighbors were stunned by Thursday’s news.

“There’s never much activity going on over there,” said a neighbor, who declined to be named. Added another neighbor, “That’s what surprises us, because he was an airline pilot, and he flew for Spirit.”

Pilot flew last week

Halye last flew for Spirit on Friday, according to the “ultra low fares” carrier. The pilot’s social media accounts indicate he was based at its Detroit operations center. The airline does not provide service to Dayton International Airport.

“Captain Halye served at the airline for just over nine years,” Paul Berry, the company’s spokesman, said in a statement expressing the company’s sympathies to his family, friends and colleagues.

The Dayton Daily News asked Spirit Airlines officials to provide more details about Halye’s last-flown routes and upcoming flights, as well as the dates and results of any drug screenings. Spirit declined to answer.

Federal regulations require employers to administer drug and alcohol testing in pre-employment, reasonable suspicion, random, post-accident, reasonable cause and follow-up situations, Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Elizabeth Cory said.

MORE: Spirit Airlines pilot suspected in OD flew 6 days ago

Pilots must hold valid medical certificates in order to fly. The Airline Transport Pilot certificate, which Halye held, requires a first-class medical certificate, which must be updated every 12 months for a pilot under the age of 40. Halye was 36.

The FAA database lists Halye’s medical certificate date as September, 2011, which would mean the certificate expired more than four years ago. Asked to double check, Cory said Halye’s certificate was up-to-date, with it due to expire this fall.

“I’m not sure why the online database does not have that information,” Cory said in an email to the Dayton Daily News. “The system could be in the process of update.”

Dr. Richard Garrison is among the doctors who conducts such tests locally. Garrison said that exam is roughly similar to an annual physical, and also includes vision testing and EKG heart tests for pilots over a certain age. But he said those exams do not include substance-abuse testing.

Drug issues everywhere

Multiple-death overdoses at a single site happened at least four times in Montgomery County in 2016 — including to Jamie Haddix and Darrell Morgan, who were found dead on Christmas Eve. The place where they died, a four-unit apartment building on Wiltshire Boulevard in Kettering, isn’t ground zero in the region’s opioid crisis because there is no ground zero.

“You always hear, ‘It can’t happen in my neighborhood,’ ” said Michael Link, who lives around the corner from the Halyes in Centerville. “But it does.”

Centerville ranked comparatively low on Montgomery County’s 2016 overdose list, with only five residents dying from drug causes, according to preliminary coroner’s data. That’s much lower than comparably sized Trotwood (17), Miamisburg (14) and Riverside (13). But nearly every community in the county had a spot on that list, which included 355 deaths.

Two of the children attended Centerville’s Tower Heights Middle School and two attended another district. Centerville schools Superintendent Tom Henderson said the district “continues to support friends of the students who were part of this family. Centerville had guidance counselors “on call and on deck as needed.”

Henderson said so many students know each other not only from school, but from sports and other cross-community activities that a tragedy like this can have a wider impact that people might think.

“These two students have come up through our district, so we try to be cognizant of that and get out to the other buildings they’ve attended,” Henderson said. “We’ll be ready (Friday) when students come in, and we’ll be ready when the students (in that family) come back to attend school again.”

Staff Writers Chris Stewart, Malik Perkins, Katie Wedell and Hannah Poturalski contributed reporting.

Why students don't have to stand for Pledge of Allegiance in Florida

Compiled from Associated Press and Florida News Service reports.

Trending on Facebook

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Students excused from having to daily recite the Pledge of Allegiance in Florida public schools would no longer have to stand and hold their hands over their heart either, under a bill that is headed to the House floor.

The House Education Committee on Wednesday unanimously approved a bill (HB 1403) that would change how students are notified of their right to skip the daily pledge and what the excused student must do during the pledge.

Current law requires schools to conspicuously post a notice, telling students they don’t have to recite the pledge if a parent asks in writing for a student to be excused. The law also requires excused students to still stand and hold their hands over their hearts while the pledge is recited.

The bill would allow the notice to instead be placed in a student handbook, and excused students would no longer be required to stand or hold their hands over their hearts.

The bill was filed after a parent of a child at a Panhandle school told the school district it was not following notice requirements. A Senate companion bill has not yet been heard in the first of its three required committees.

School lunches: Here’s what your kids will be eating if this bill passes

A bipartisan Senate agreement expected to be voted on Wednesday will include some changes to the meals your children will be offered at school, and it may be changes that would bring them to the table.

The bill, which is expected to be passed by the full Senate, will offer more flexibility to the nations nearly 100,000 public schools as it eases requirements on the use of whole grains and delays a deadline to cut the level of sodium in school lunches.

The legislation has grown out of complaints by some schools that the requirements for their meals – changed in 2012 with the support of first lady Michelle Obama – are burdensome and that children are not eating the food.

To qualify for federal reimbursements for free and reduced-cost meals, schools are required to meet federal government nutrition guidelines. The guidelines set in 2012 imposed limits on the amount of fats, calories, sugar and sodium that meals could include.

Many schools balked at the standards, saying children would not eat the healthier options. Wednesday’s vote comes after a bill that would have allowed schools to opt out of the program entirely failed in 2014.

Per the bill, the Agriculture Department would be required to revised the whole grain and sodium standards for meals within 90 days of its passage.

Here’s how the legislation would change what school lunchrooms are serving:

Grains: Currently, all grains served in public schools must be whole grains, meaning the food made from grain must have been made using 100 percent of the original grain kernel. The new legislation requires that 80 percent  of the grains used be whole grain or more than half whole grain. (Currently, schools may request waivers from the whole grain requirement.)

Salt: The implementation of stricter standards for the amount of sodium in school meals would be delayed until 2019 under the new legislation. The bill would also fund a study into the benefits of lowering salt levels in school meals.

Waste: The problem of waste is a big one in school lunches. Under the new legislation, the Department of Agriculture and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would be tasked with coming up with a way to reduce what is not eaten by students – particularly fruits and vegetables. Children are currently required to take the food on the lunch line, but many toss them without touching a bite.

Summer programs: More money would be allocated for summer feeding programs – where school lunchrooms offer meals for children who qualify.

No Child Left Behind overhaul: What the new guidelines may look like

The House is set today to vote on a rewrite of the controversial No Child Left Behind education bill that has, for nearly a generation, increased the federal government’s role in elementary and secondary education in America.

The update to NCLB, called the “Every Student Succeeds Act,” (ESSA) will loosen some of the restrictions the NCLB placed on schools and transfer much of the job of measuring school progress to the states.

Here’s what NCLB is, what it requires and how it will change under ESSA

What is NCLB? 

The No Child Left Behind Act increased the role of the federal government in elementary and secondary education holding schools responsible for the academic progress of all its students – particularly focusing on  poor, minority and special education students and students for whom English is a second language.

It was not without many critics who railed against its heavy federal involvement  in local school  districts, the goals which many came to believe were unrealistic and the penalties that were deemed  harsh for “underperforming” schools.

How will it change under “Every Student Succeeds” Act, or ESSA?

  • States set their own goals for educating students and the rate at which the goals should be met. Under NCLB, the government  set the goal of every child in American public schools being proficient in math and reading by the end of the  school year in 2014. No state made that goal.
  • States still have to test students in math and reading in Grades 3 through 8 and then one year in high school. The results must be publicly reported.
  • Each state must come up with a way to judge a school’s performance. What would now be considered an “underperforming” school would be one which sits in the lowest-performing 5 percent of schools in the state.
  • Goals in judging how a school performs would have to include test scores, graduation rates and English proficiency rates. States,  however,  can include other factors they consider important to a school’s performance.
  • Instead of the sometimes severe actions underperforming schools could face under NCLB, each state will decided what action will be taken and how long the school could be considered “underperforming” before the action is taken.
  • The federal government  can no longer threaten to withhold funding as a means to force states to use test scores to evaluate the performance of teachers.
  • States would be able to use different (approved) tests in different parts of the state, instead of having  to use one test to measure for the entire state.
  • The Education Department may not give states incentives to use any particular set of teaching standards such as the curriculum guidelines  found in Common Core.
  • Title 1 money would not follow a low-income student to another school of their parent’s choice.  It would stay at the school to which it was first issued.
  • The new law would encourage caps on the time students spend taking standardized tests.
  • The language released Monday is based on a framework agreed to this month by a conference committee composed of lawmakers from both parties and both chambers of Congress.

Click here for the final text of a compromise bill that rewrites No Child Left Behind.  

   

Photos: America's Top 10 party schools

Mom: Injured Fairmont wrestler awakes from coma

UPDATE @ 2:35 p.m. (Sept. 15): The following update about injured Fairmont wrestler Ahmad Doucet was posted on Facebook by his mother, Angela Fisher:

“Ahmad has been working extremely hard on his recovery. Over the last 6 weeks there has been a lot of improvement. Ahmad is no longer in a coma, he is in what is defined as a minimally conscious state. This means that he is alert during the the day and sleeps at night. He is aware of his surroundings and responds to what he sees and hears. He has begun to communicate with his eyes.

For example, you can hold pictures in front of him and ask him to look at a specific person and he is able to do that. You can also ask him a question that is is specific to a certain person and he is able to identify who you are referring to. He can answer yes and no using eye movements. He is also able to make some purposeful movements at times. Medically he has been stable and really looks good. Although he still has a long way to go, I am so happy to see the progress he has made. Ahmad is improving daily.

I appreciate all the love and support everyone has shown to my son and my family. I truly believe that the love and support you have given has played a tremendous role in Ahmads progress!

THANK YOU!”

EARLIER REPORT (July 10)

Ahmad Doucet — the Fairmont High School wrestler who suffered a stroke in a freak accident while training on June 21 — may be able to go home in six to eight weeks, depending on how well he recovers from a tracheostomy.

Ahmad remains unresponsive and on a ventilator.

He will undergo the procedure “in the very near future,” according to his mother, Angela Fisher.

In an update on the Fairmont High School Firebirds sports blog, Fisher said Ahmad will remain in the hospital for six to eight more weeks after surgery before returning home.

“I can’t say it enough, the support each and everyone of you have provided in whatever way you have been able to provide means so much,” Fisher said. “I am constantly praying for a miracle that GOD will allow Ahmad to wake up and live his amazing life. The continuing love and support all of you have shown to Ahmad has been a comfort in a very, very difficult time.”

Fisher said she will provide more updates on Ahmad’s condition as soon as she is able.

Deaf valedictorian gives inspirational speech at graduation

RAW VIDEO: Deaf valedictorian gives inspirational speech at graduation

Fallout over yearbook quote may ruin girl's senior year

Fallout over yearbook quote may ruin girl's senior year
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