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BRUNCH BILL: Backers of earlier Sunday alcohol sales launch campaign

A coalition of downtown Dayton businesses and the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce are putting together a campaign to urge voters in one downtown precinct to allow bars and restaurants in that precinct to start serving alcohol at 10 a.m. instead of 11 a.m. on Sundays.

9 of the best brunch spots in Dayton

The issue — which supporters have dubbed the “brunch bill,” and which will appear as Local Issue 11 on the ballot — will be decided by voters in Precinct 1-B in downtown Dayton. There are about 1,100 registered voters in precinct 1-B, which includes the business strip of the Oregon District on East Fifth Street as well as the area around the Cannery and part of the Water Street development. It does not include the residential neighborhood just south of the Oregon District strip on East Fifth Street, which is part of another precinct.

“The pendulum for downtown Dayton is on the upswing right now, and we want to keep that momentum going,” said Chris Kershner, vice president of public policy and economic development for the Dayton chamber.

9 more Dayton-area brunch spots for your next weekend out

Kershner said several downtown Dayton restaurants approached chamber officials about seeking the change, and the chamber spearheaded the petition drive to place the issue on the fall ballot. A “yes” vote will allow the one-hour-earlier start time only at those alcohol-permit holders in precinct 1-B, and would have no impact on other restaurants and bars outside of the precinct.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Dayton restaurants seek change in Sunday alcohol start time

Kershner said supporters are concerned about the ballot language as written by the Ohio Secretary of State’s office, because it doesn’t make clear that a “yes” vote would simply move the start time for Sunday alcohol sales from the current 11 a.m. state-mandated start time to 10 a.m. Some voters may read the language and think the measure would allow Sunday alcohol sales for the first time, Kershner said.

The best Bloody Marys in Dayton

Here’s how Issue 11 will appear on the ballot of voters in precinct 1-B:

“Shall the sale of intoxicating liquor, of the same type as may be legally sold in this precinct on other days of the week, be permitted in this Dayton 1-B Precinct for consumption on premises where sold between the hours of 10 a.m. and midnight on Sunday?”

The “vote yes” campaign will focus on education rather than advocacy, Kershner said, to make sure voters know a “yes” vote simply allows for the one-hour-earlier start time on Sundays.

Steve Tieber, owner of the Dublin Pub at East Fifth Street and Wayne Avenue, said Sunday sales are important to his restaurant and to many other alcohol-permit holders in downtown Dayton.

“Sunday is our third-busiest day,” behind only Friday and Saturday, Tieber said of the Dublin Pub. And most of the pub’s Sunday sales are related to its brunch service.

The 12 best restaurants in Dayton

Restaurant owners told chamber officials it is frustrating to be forced to refuse customer orders of brunch cocktails such as Bloody Marys and mimosas during what for some is the first hour of their brunch service. The change will give restaurants more flexibility, boost sales and ultimately create and preserve jobs, Tieber said.

The precinct has about 1,100 voters. Kershner and Tieber are helping to put together a grass-roots campaign led by retailers and other “brunch bill” coalition members, which number about 20 and include the Downtown Dayton Partnership and the chamber.

“We’ll do mailings, yard signs, banners — anything to get the word out,” Kershner said.

How to score the famous Troy Strawberry Fest donuts in special sale this weekend only

The news is true: you can get the famous Troy strawberry donuts this weekend. 

>> 8 of the most delicious donuts in Dayton

The Troy Music Boosters are hosting a donut flash sale on Saturday, Sept. 16 from 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Donuts will be $1 each. 

>> What happened when Bill’s Donuts asked for hurricane donations? THIS!

>> What to know about Bill’s Donut Shop

Usually, the donuts are sold during the Troy Strawberry Festival, where people will wait for hours in line to get them. 

>> 12 amazing strawberry treats to try at the Strawberry Festival

>> These photos of kids staring longingly at Bill’s Donuts will make you say ‘SAME’

>> Bill’s Donut Shop named 1 of the 2 ‘Best in America’

New gaming café gears up for October opening near the Dayton Mall

The founder of a board-game café under construction near the Dayton Mall is using a Kickstarter campaign to expand the cafe’s game library and will host a party this Saturday at a Dayton brewery to help launch the effort in style.

RELATED: 7 bar and gaming arcades to visit in Dayton

And yes, board games will be part of the Cardboard Crowns launch party, which will be held from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 16 at Warped Wing Brewing Co. at 26 Wyandot St. in downtown Dayton. In addition to games for all ages, Cardboard Crowns also will raffle off board games throughout the day. There is no admission charge.

“We’re launching the Kickstarter to help us expand the cafe’s game library and to help us boost our board game art and decor throughout the cafe,” founder Ben T. Adams said. “We also want to provide a way for the community to really buy into the space and to make them feel like they had a hand in helping us make Cardboard Crowns a reality.”

RELATED: The stunning transformation of Dayton’s newest arcade bar, DK Effect

Pledge levels start at $5, “and every person who donates will get their name on a hex that will be inlaid into the cafe’s bar top to show they supported us from the beginning,” Adams said. Details can be found at the Cardboard Crowns Kickstarter Launch page.

Buildout of the space at 147 N. Springboro Pike (Ohio 741) in the Corners at the Mall retail center is progressing. “We’re still shooting for a mid-to-late October opening,” Adams said.

NEW TODAY: Daytonians of the Week: the owners of Oregon Express Bar & Restaurant

Plans call for a offering eight craft beers on tap and a selection of 30 to 40 bottled or canned craft beers, along with wines and a limited cocktail list, Adams has said. The food menu will include lighter fare — sandwiches and snacks, mostly.

The board games list will be extensive. “We’re looking at a starting library of 400 to 500 titles,” Adams said in June.

RELATED: Gamer cafe in the works near the Dayton Mall (June 2017)

The selections will range from lighter games to more involved, strategic games. Cardboard Crowns’ staff will be trained to teach the basics of the cafés games, and to make recommendations to patrons who are looking for something new to try, Adams said.

RELATED: Kettering bar has 300 board games, craft beers — and no TVs

The new café’s concept is part of a national and local trend to combine gaming and drinks. Adams said he looked at about a dozen locations across the region, including sites in downtown Dayton, Beavercreek and Kettering, before selecting the 3,500-square-foot space at the Corners at the Mall location within the Miamisburg city limits.

WATCH: We stopped by the D20 gamer bar and it was PACKED

For more information, or to monitor the café’s progress, check out the Cardboard Crowns Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CardboardCrownsDayton.

Local woman wins car on ‘The Price is Right’

UPDATE @ 1:15 p.m.:

Vandalia resident Patricia Hoendorf won a car during her appearance on “Price is Right” this morning.

Hoendorf spun the wheel to make it to the Showcase Showdown, but eventually lost to the other contestant.

INITIAL REPORT:

A Dayton area woman will “come on down” on an upcoming episode of the “Price is Right.”

Patricia A. Larger Hoendorf of Vandalia appeared on the show Sept. 19. The show airs 11 a.m. weekdays on WHIO channel 7. 

WHIO is a part of Cox Media Group Ohio. 

Cleveland native Drew Carey has hosted the game show for a decade. 

Hoendorf attended a watch party Tuesday at Little York Tavern. She said the best part of being on the show was the supportive and happy environment.

 

Reports: Florida GOP leader once beat female classmate with claw hammer until it broke

Florida GOP officials find themselves in an unusual position after they learned that a newly elected member of the Broward County executive board was once charged with attempted murder in connection with the brutal claw hammer attack of a female classmate at his California prep school.

Rupert Tarsey, 28, was elected secretary of the Broward County GOP chapter four months ago, according to the Miami Herald. His new position came into question after a fellow member made the discovery earlier this month. 

That member informed Broward County GOP chairman Bob Sutton about Tarsey’s past over the Labor Day weekend.

“We were blindsided,” Sutton told the Herald. “He’s a member of the Knights of Columbus, for Christ’s sake. And he came highly recommended by the former chair. We had no idea what his background is.

“We want him out, but he is refusing to resign. He deceived us. It looks like he even used a reputation management firm to make sure we wouldn’t find out who he is.”

Tarsey, who volunteered on President Donald Trump’s campaign, admitted that he has no intention of resigning his post. 

“Why should I resign?” Tarsey asked. “I did nothing wrong, and I was elected. This is just party politics.”

Sutton suspended Tarsey from party functions last week. 

Tarsey’s real name is Rupert Ditsworth, the Herald reported. He changed his name to Tarsey, his mother’s maiden name, when he moved to Fort Lauderdale two years after the 2007 incident, the newspaper said. 

Los Angeles Times story reported that Tarsey, then 17, was accused of attacking Elizabeth Barcay, an 18-year-old classmate at Harvard-Westlake School in L.A., on May 14, 2007, with a claw hammer, hitting her at least 40 times and splitting open her head. Barcay’s mother, Barbara Hayden, told the Times that her daughter also suffered a shattered leg and a broken nose in the attack. 

Tarsey’s parents admitted him to a psychiatric hospital immediately after the assault, the Times reported. He was initially charged as a juvenile with both attempted murder and assault with a deadly weapon.

The juvenile case was dropped, and he was rearrested in June 2007, the day after his 18th birthday, so he could be tried as an adult.

Prosecutors at the time told the Chronicle, the online newspaper of Harvard-Westlake School, that Tarsey was tried as an adult because of the seriousness of the injuries suffered by the victim. If convicted of the charges, he faced a possible life sentence.

The Times reported that the attack started after Tarsey invited Barcay to ride with him to a juice bar after a big Advanced Placement exam at school. After drinking smoothies and returning to his Jaguar, he grabbed a backpack from the rear seat and placed it between his legs, according to Barcay.

Barcay told police that instead of returning to school, Tarsey parked in a residential neighborhood in Studio City, not far from campus. Appearing anxious, she said he told her he was contemplating suicide.

When she urged him to return to school to seek help from a counselor, she said he told her, “It isn’t going to happen that way,” the Times reported.

Telling her he wasn’t going to kill himself alone, he pulled a claw hammer from his backpack and attacked her, the newspaper said. 

A witness walking nearby saw the struggle inside the Jaguar and called 911, the newspaper said. 

Tarsey got out of the car, pulled open the passenger-side door and pulled Barcay out by her hair, the Times said. He continued hitting her with the hammer until the tool broke.

He then choked her until she bit his finger, the Times reported. That’s when Tarsey got back behind the wheel and drove off. 

>> Read more trending news

Tarsey ultimately claimed self-defense in the case.

“In the end, I pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor,” Tarsey told the Herald. “It’s not the charges that matter, it’s what happens in court.”

He argued that he did not change his name to hide who he was, but did so after his parents divorced. He said he is estranged from his father. 

After moving to Florida, Tarsey went to college and earned an MBA from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale. He is now married with two children and a third on the way.

Barcay, who went to prom and graduation in a wheelchair following the attack, went on to study at Williams College. Her alumni information shows that she went on to earn a master’s degree in education from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education. 

She is now an elementary school teacher in the Boston area. 

Free no more: Oregon District parking lot to charge customers

A free parking lot in the Oregon Historic District is converting to a pay system from late afternoon to the early morning hours to pay for security, aesthetic improvements and increased maintenance.

The Oregon community lot, located at the southwest end of the business district on East Fifth Street, will start charging car owners $3 to park from between 4 p.m. to 4 a.m. seven days a week.

The lot’s 140 public spaces will remain free up until 4 p.m., but after that, people will have to use a pay station or a mobile app to avoid getting a ticket or possibly towed.

RELATED: Paid parking comes to Oregon District

Drinking and misbehavior in the parking lot has led to trash, broken bottles, broken glass and other issues that hopefully will be eliminated with the addition of a parking authority and attendant, said Steve Budd, senior adviser of CityWide, which is part owner of the lot.

“And we haven’t done a refresh of the landscape in eight years,” he said.

The switch from free to fee parking follows in the footsteps of the lot behind Ned Peppers and the one next to the Environmental Protection Agency, which late last year implemented metered systems.

MORE: Owner District paid lot ‘not a money-maker,’ according to owner

Starting Monday, the Oregon District community lot will begin charging car owners after 4 p.m.

Four pay machines will be installed at the property, which is located by Omega Music, Oregon Express, Thai 9 and Jay’s Seafood. The lot was rebuilt in 2008 and has been free to visitors since that time.

The parking fees will help pay for additional lighting, landscaping upgrades and for the services of a professional parking authority to monitor and enforce the new regulations, Budd said.

Visitors will enter their license plate numbers into an electronic station and pay with cash or credit cards.

They also will have the option to pay using their mobile devices by downloading and using the Passport Parking App (PPPRK.COM).

CityWide owns about 60 percent of the 140-space parking lot. About 30 percent is owned by Jay’s Seafood and about 10 percent belongs to Gottschlich & Portune, LLP.

However, Omega Music owns 26 spaces that it does not plan to charge its customers to use.

The community lot was upgraded significantly in 2008 to offer free parking and more spaces to help the Oregon District become even more of an arts and entertainment destination.

The city of Dayton supported the lot enhancements using money from its development fund, including a $850,000 grant to CityWide.

VIDEO: Dayton gym teacher drags kindergartner across floor

Video of a Dayton Public Schools teacher who reportedly “grabbed a student by the wrist during gym class at Rosa Parks Early Learning Center, twisted his arm, and dragged him across the gym floor” was obtained Tuesday by the Dayton Daily News and WHIO.

MORE: Dayton teacher fired for ‘dragging’ kindergartner across gym

David Cameron was accused of dragging the kindergarten boy “on or about” Nov. 28, 2016, according to a March 15 letter DPS Treasurer Hiwot Abraha wrote Cameron detailing the specifications of the grounds for termination.

The school board approved a resolution to terminate Cameron during a meeting in August.

The Dayton Daily News and WHIO obtained the letter and video using Ohio’s public records laws.

MORE: DPS lowers GPA for sports eligibility, adds mandatory tutoring

“The kindergarten student expressed that you were hurting him, yet you did not release him,” the letter states. “On Feb, 23, 2017, you were present at an administrative hearing regarding the charges and specifications surrounding this matter. It was noted in the hearing that you have been counseled previously regarding appropriate student disciplinary procedures.”

Cameron initially requested a hearing before a referee appointed by the Ohio Department of Education, according to the resolution from the meeting. But the document says Cameron “withdrew his request and waived any right to a hearing” before the Aug. 2 meeting.

Cameron was placed on leave for several months after the incident.

MORE: U.S. News 2018 Best Colleges: Area schools make the list

Prost! Cincinnati ranked best Oktoberfest city in U.S.

You don’t have to travel too far to go to one of the largest Oktoberfest celebrations in the world.

WalletHub ranked Cincinnati as the top city in the U.S. for Oktoberfest, the beer-drinking German tradition that often lasts from mid-September to the first Sunday in October. The celebration originated from early 19th century Munich, and the event has since evolved into the world’s biggest “people’s festival.”

» BUSINESS NEWS: Construction begins on new apartments in Centerville

Munich’s Oktoberfest attracts more than 6 million people from around the globe, who drink nearly 2 million gallon of beer each year. Oktoberfest in Munich brings in about $1.54 million in economic impact for the city.

The top U.S. cities for Oktoberfest celebrations include: Cincinnati, New York City, Portland, Philadelphia, Denver, St. Louis, Madison, Orlando, Pittsburgh and Columbus.

Cincinnati’s Oktoberfest — or Oktoberfest Zinzinnati — is this weekend on Second and Third streets, between Walnut and Elm streets — and the part attracts more than 500,000 people each year. There are private and public parking garages downtown within walking distance to the festival.

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Horse almost ended up in slaughterhouse

Photos show how the horse was identified by tattooing. They also show his treated injuries.

Springboro council OKs $380 million Austin South deal

The Springboro City Council gave the green light Thursday on development of the $380 million Austin South Springboro.

The council voted after developer Larry Dillin unveiled the project publicly for the first time.

With two members absent, the council approved a resolution 5-0 authorizing City Manager Christine Thompson to sign the development agreement with Dillin’s companies.

Those companies are VisCap - the company under which Dillin is developing and leasing on both sides of Austin Boulevard since taking over for developer Randy Gunlock and RG Properties - and Springboro Landing Associates - the company owning the 63.7 acres in Springboro city limits and 3.5 acres in Miami Twp.

“This is a wonderful thing for Springboro,” Mayor John Agenbroad said.

RELATED: Springboro ready to approve Austin South development

Now the city and Dillin’s companies begin a contingency period of 90 to 180 days expected to lead to arrangement of financing for the project. Annexation of the Miami Twp. land into Springboro is among the contingencies.

By late spring 2018, the project could be breaking ground.

It comes as Dillin concludes work at Austin Landing, a mixed-used development at Austin Boulevard across from the new project site along Interstate 75.

RELATED: Austin South could spur $350 million in development

Springboro is to finance more than $32 million to pay for roads and other infrastructure.

Dillin, his investors and the companies moving to the development are expected to put in as much as $350 million, according to the development agreement released this week.

Upscale senior and multi-family housing, a hotel and retail are among the uses anticipated in the first phase of the 67-acre development on the southeast corner of Interstate 75 and Austin Boulevard, in Springboro and Miami Twp.

RELATED: Council traveled 2.5 hours for meeting at Levis Commons

Dillin and the city reached agreement after setting aside terms of a settlement reached by the city and the prior developer, R.G. Properties, in a lawsuit about plans to build a WalMart there.

RELATED: Springboro ready to negotiate on property across from Austin Landing

The development agreement sets a schedule of payments to Miamisburg City Schools, starting in 2021. Payments of more than $3 million would be in lieu of taxes on the improvements that are to be diverted through tax incremental financing to help pay for the development.

The development is to be accessed off Austin Boulevard by an entrance across from one leading into Austin Landing and allowing no left turns for westbound motorists. A full entrance would be built off 741, Main Street in Springboro.

Dillin is also expected to be involved in redevelopment of Springboro’s central crossroads, Main Street and Central Avenue, Ohio 73 in Springboro.

RELATED: Architect hired to redesign former Springboro IGA shopping center site 

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