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Jimmy Fallon's mother, Gloria, dies at 68

A spokesperson for Jimmy Fallon’s family confirmed Saturday evening that the Fallons were mourning the loss of their matriarch.

“Jimmy Fallon’s mother, Gloria, died peacefully on Saturday,” a family spokesperson told People. “Jimmy was at his mother’s bedside, along with her loved ones, when she passed away at NYU Langone Medical Center in NYC. Our prayers go out to Jimmy and his family as they go through this tough time.”

>> On Rare.us: 'Teen Mom' star shares message to Kylie Jenner about the harsh reality of young motherhood

News of Gloria Fallon’s death comes 24 hours after NBC canceled a taping of “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.” At the time, an unspecified family emergency was cited. On Saturday, Amir “Questlove” Thompson of the legendary Roots crew seemed to confirm her death to TMZ.

“The Tonight Show” bandleader was signing autographs in Los Angeles when asked about the canceled taping.

>> Read more trending news 

“When you lose someone, it’s always sad,” Questlove said.

Questlove was unclear as to when Fallon would return to the show.

Biltmore Estate owner dies at his North Carolina home

The owner of the iconic Biltmore Estate in North Carolina has died at his home.

>> Watch the news report here

Officials at the Biltmore Co. said William Amherst Vanderbilt Cecil died Tuesday in Asheville. He was 89.

Cecil had a career in finance before returning to Asheville in 1960 in hopes of preserving his childhood home, which was the private estate of his grandfather, George Washington Vanderbilt III.

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Local media outlets reported that Cecil's parents opened the Biltmore house to the public in 1930, but it didn't make a profit until 1969, and then it was only $17. Cecil said, "My dad was very proud of that."

Today, the 8,000-acre (3,238-hectare) estate, French-style chateau and attractions draw more than 1.4 million people annually.

Surfing, wetsuit pioneer Jack O'Neill dies at 94

Jack O’Neill, the iconic surfer who pioneered the wetsuit that revolutionized cold-water surfing, died Friday, KSBW reported. He was 94.

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Known for his signature eye patch, O’Neill invented wetsuits that allowed surfers to navigate northern and central California’s cold-water waves year-round.

"It's a sad day for surfing," Mavericks big wave surfer Ken "Skindog" Collins told KSBW on Friday.

In 1955, O’Neill set up a small surf shop at Ocean Beach in San Francisco and sold his revolutionary wetsuit there. He moved to Santa Cruz in 1959 and set up another shop at Cowell Beach.

"Guys were using sweaters from the Goodwill. I remember one guy got a jumper from the Goodwill and sprayed it with Thompson's water seal, and he set out there in an oil slick," O'Neill said in a 1999 interview.

O'Neill's early wetsuits were eyed with skepticism, but he continued experimenting with neoprene, a material that is still used today.

His iconic pirate-like black eye patch was the result of a surfing accident when he fell while riding a wave at the Hook, KSBW reported.

Who was David Rockefeller?

David Rockefeller was the oldest living billionaire, a banker and a philanthropist, but he was more than that.

As the youngest and last surviving grandson of Standard Oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, David inherited the fabled Rockefeller fortune and wielded great power and influence during his lifetime. From Washington to New York City government to capitals around the world, his influence was far flung and included banking, education and the art world.

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He was born in New York City on June 12, 1915, the youngest of six children. His father, John D. Rockefeller Jr., was the only son of John D. Rockefeller. David Rockefeller was a graduate of Harvard University and attended the London School of Economics. 

He married Margaret McGrath in 1940 and had six children.

During the 1970s Rockefeller was chairman and chief executive of Chase Manhattan Bank and helped settle New York City’s financial crisis in the middle of the decade. 

He was well-known to world leaders, including South African President Nelson Mandela, China’s Deng Xiaoping, the shah of Iran and Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt. 

In Ron Chernow’s 1998 biography of David Rockefeller, called “Titan,” Chernow wrote, “The range of David Rockefeller’s business and philanthropic and political connections is perhaps unequaled.”

>> Got a question about the news? See our explainers here 

He was chairman of the Museum of Modern Art and spearheaded a campaign to get corporations to, not only buy and display art in their buildings, but also support local museums, according to The New York Times.

David Rockefeller was also known for his philanthropy, bequeathing $225 million to the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, a foundation promoting global social change. He gave $100 million to both The Museum of Modern Art, which was co-founded by his mother, Abigail Greene Aldrich Rockefeller, in 1929, and Rockefeller University, Bloomberg reported.

He also gave Harvard a $100 million donation in 2008.

As of 2016, David Rockefeller had an estimated worth of more than $3 billion.

He was one of five Rockefeller brothers and the last surviving sibling. His death closes a chapter in the fabled and influential Rockefeller family. 

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, author who wrote heartbreaking 'dating profile' for husband, dead at 51

The terminally ill Chicago author who wrote a heartbreaking "dating profile" for her husband has died.

According to The Associated Press, Amy Krouse Rosenthal, who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2015, died Monday, her literary agent confirmed. She was 51.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Author with terminal cancer writes emotional 'dating profile' for husband

In a column titled "You May Want to Marry My Husband" published earlier this month in The New York Times, Rosenthal, known for her children's books and the memoir "Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal," wrote about how she hoped that her husband, Jason, will love again after her death. The essay quickly went viral online, with more than 4 1/2 million readers, the Times reported.

>> Read the full essay here

"I'm facing a deadline, in this case, a pressing one," Rosenthal wrote. "I need to say this (and say it right) while I have a) your attention, and b) a pulse."

She then described her husband of 26 years in a mock dating profile.

"I have never been on Tinder, Bumble or eHarmony, but I'm going to create a general profile for Jason right here, based on my experience of coexisting in the same house with him for, like, 9,490 days," she wrote.

Rosenthal called Jason an "absolutely wonderful father" and a "dreamy, let's-go-for-it travel companion."

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2017

She added: "Here is the kind of man Jason is: He showed up at our first pregnancy ultrasound with flowers. This is a man who, because he is always up early, surprises me every Sunday morning by making some kind of oddball smiley face out of items near the coffeepot: a spoon, a mug, a banana.

"This is a man who emerges from the minimart or gas station and says, 'Give me your palm.' And, voila, a colorful gumball appears. (He knows I love all the flavors but white.)

"My guess is you know enough about him now. So let's swipe right."

Days later, Jason shared his emotional reaction to the essay.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Husband of dying author says he was 'ripped apart' by emotional 'dating profile'

"I was with her as she labored through this process, and I can tell you that writing the story was no easy task," Jason told People magazine. "When I read her words for the first time, I was shocked at the beauty, slightly surprised at the incredible prose given her condition and, of course, emotionally ripped apart.”

He said he doesn't have his wife's way with words, "but if I did, I can assure you that my tale would be about the most epic love story – ours," People reported.

>> Read more trending news

That love was apparent on Valentine's Day, when Jason "hung music sheets with words to different love songs for Amy, with notes on each one," Rosenthal's literary agent, Amy Rennert, told the Chicago Sun-Times. It was the same day Rosenthal completed her column.

Read more here or here.

After learning she didn't have long to live, she composed a dating profile for the man she'd leave behind https://t.co/j7SStrsMo6— The New York Times (@nytimes) March 5, 2017 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Joni Sledge of Sister Sledge dead at 60

Joni Sledge of the music group Sister Sledge has died at age 60.

According to The Associated Press, Biff Warren, publicist for the band best known for its 1979 hit "We Are Family," said a friend found Sledge dead in her Phoenix home Friday. Her cause of death is not yet known.   

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2017

Warren told the AP and CNN that Sledge had not been sick.

In a Facebook post Saturday, the group, formed by Sledge and her sisters in 1971, announced the news and asked for prayers.

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"Yesterday, numbness fell upon our family. We are saddened to inform you that our dear sister, mother, aunt, niece and cousin, Joni, passed away yesterday. Please pray for us as we weep for this loss. We do know that she is now eternally with Our Lord," the post read.

"We thank you in advance for allowing us the privacy to mourn quietly as a family. We miss her and hurt for her presence, her radiance, and the sincerity with which she loved and embraced life."

>> See the post here

<script>(function(d, s, id) {</span><br /><span>  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];</span><br /><span>  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;</span><br /><span>  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;</span><br /><span>  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.8";</span><br /><span>  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);</span><br /><span>}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script> Important AnnouncementPosted by Sister Sledge on Saturday, March 11, 2017

Sledge leaves behind a son and her sisters, the AP reported.

Read more here or here.

Joseph Wapner, 'People's Court' judge, dead at 97

Rest in peace, Judge Joseph Wapner.

According to The Associated Press and TMZ, the fan favorite from “The People’s Court” died Sunday. He was 97 years old.

"The People's Court," which debuted in September 1981, helped open the doors for reality TV, including popular court shows.

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths in 2017

Wapner entertained audiences with his opinionated personality and heard thousands of cases during his 12-year run, which ended in 1993.

Before he was a TV judge, Wapner was a judge in Los Angeles' municipal and superior courts. 

He was reportedly hospitalized earlier last week for breathing problems, and his condition worsened. He returned to his Los Angeles home on Friday and was under hospice care until he passed away on Sunday.

>> Read more trending news

Wapner was married to his wife, Mickey, for 70 years and had three children.

Golf legend Arnold Palmer dead at 87

Matt Roberts, former 3 Doors Down guitarist, dead at 38

Former 3 Doors Down guitarist Matt Roberts died Saturday, just hours before he was supposed to perform at a benefit concert in Wisconsin, CNN reports. He was 38.

According to CNN, Roberts' father, Darrell, had traveled with his son to West Bend, where Roberts was scheduled to play at Rockin' for Heroes, a fundraiser for veterans, this weekend.

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths in 2016

Darrell Roberts said he learned of his son's death Saturday morning from police, who said Roberts was found "either asleep or passed out in the hallway of his hotel." 

"I was wakened at 8:50 (Saturday) morning by some detectives beating on my door," Darrell Roberts told CNN. "It's always scary as a parent; they were in suits and that's when they told me."

Roberts' cause of death was not yet known, but his father told CNN that the guitarist, who left 3 Doors Down in 2012 because of "health issues," was addicted to prescription drugs.

>> Read more trending stories

"He suffered greatly from anxiety," Darrell Roberts said. "It's crazy; as a performer, he never liked crowds or liked places he didn't know about as a baby, as a child, and this was his way of dealing with it, and me and him talked about it often."

He added, "I thought he had beaten it all."

Read more here.

Photos: Muhammad Ali mourned around the world

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