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These are the last images ever taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft

After a remarkable 20-year voyage in space, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft made its grand exit Friday as it disintegrated into Saturn’s atmosphere.

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According to scientists at NASA’s Deep Space Network in Canberra, Australia, Earth received Cassini’s final signal at 7:55 a.m. ET.

One minute earlier, the spacecraft entered Saturn’s atmosphere from about 1,190 miles above the planet’s cloud tops at a speed of approximately 70,000 miles per hour.

At that point, the beloved NASA spacecraft burned up and shortly came apart, officially becoming a part of Saturn itself.

>> Related: NASA responds to 9-year-old’s application for planetary protection job

Scientists chose this dramatic, fiery send-off because they didn’t want to risk Cassini colliding with any of Saturn’s moons.

But it was a bittersweet goodbye for Cassini.

Launched in October 1997, the $3.2 billion collaborative mission between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency led to a number of monumental discoveries, especially during the Cassini spacecraft’s 13-plus years on Saturn.

>> Related: NASA says it’s not running a child slave colony on Mars

On Thursday, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft took its final images before plunging to its death Friday morning.

Astronomers pick up radio signals from space

A series of unexplained radio signals were discovered from a source in a galaxy three billion light years away, WJZ reported.

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Scientists with the Breakthrough Listen initiative said they detected 15 repeating, fast radio bursts coming from the same mysterious source they recorded in 2012. In 2015, the same source became the first object to record a repeating radio burst.

The Aug. 26 discovery also comes from the only source whose location has been positively confirmed in space, WJZ reported. The dwarf galaxy signal that was found in is much smaller than the Milky Galaxy, with about half the number of stars in it.

“The possible implications are two folds,” Dr. Vishal Gajjar of Breakthrough Listen said. “This detection at such a high frequency helps us scrutinize many of FRB 121102’s origin models.”

Researchers at Harvard said the signals’ power could be making it easier for astronomers to find than others in the cosmos.

“Previously we thought there wasn’t much emission at high or low frequencies, but now it looks like there is,” said Professor Avi Loeb at Harvard University. “It’s twice as high as the typical frequency that was previously claimed for this repeater.”

Elon Musk unveils sleek space suit for SpaceX astronauts bound for Mars

Elon Musk unveils sleek space suit for SpaceX astronauts bound for Mars

The new space suit designed by SpaceX chief executive Elon Musk isn’t just elegant. It’s super functional, too.

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Musk revealed a photo of the suit on Instagram Wednesday, worn by a SpaceX engineer.

It wasn’t a mock-up version, either. It was the real deal.

In fact, Musk added that the suit has already been tested to double vacuum pressure, though building a suit with both the aesthetic appeal and functionality was no easy feat.

The pressure suits, meant to be worn by astronauts riding SpaceX’s Dragon capsule (and not actually for them to walk out on) put an elegant twist on the classic space suit worn by NASA astronauts for ages.

The Dragon spacecraft made history in 2012 when it became the first commercial spacecraft to deliver cargo to the International Space Station and then safely return the cargo to Earth. The capsule was initially designed to carry humans.

According to the SpaceX website, the company is currently refining the capsule for NASA astronauts to fly in.

The Dragon spacecraft’s first manned test flight is expected as early as 2018.

No, Earth will not experience 15 days of darkness

It's time to set the record straight on a recent fake claim involving Venus and Jupiter that's causing concern.

In recent days, rumors have been spinning around that Earth will experience 15 days of darkness this November. The reports, which cite a fake NASA document, incorrectly claim that from 2:50 a.m. Nov. 15 to Nov. 30, the Earth will go dark (and not just for a few minutes – but days).

>> Solar eclipse 2017: Did you damage your eyes looking at the eclipse? Here are some symptoms

Now, the silly reasoning behind this is that Jupiter and Venus will “come in close proximity of each other,” which somehow causes a reaction with the sun and theoretically causes the sun to go out.

Well, no need to worry because this theory is nonsense and has absolutely no scientific reasoning behind it. Our planet will NOT experience 15 days of darkness. But for fun, here is a list of things that could happen if we did experience just a week of complete darkness:

>> On WSBTV.com: Complete coverage of the solar eclipse

• You would first notice it would get pretty cold, pretty quickly (since there is no sun to heat the surface and atmosphere on earth)• No sun means no photosynthesis and those cold temperatures sure wouldn’t help anything grow (so I guess no more plants or food for us!)• Finally, if the sun decided to take a vacation for a week – the gravitational effect on us and other planets would be monumental. Without gravity, our planet would just float off into space.

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But again, no need to worry, there will not be a blackout for days on end. The closest thing we will ever get to this is another solar eclipse like we experienced Monday.

Humorous warning to protect horses during eclipse goes viral

An animal rescue organization in Florida had a humorous solution for protecting horses during Monday’s solar eclipse, and it has gotten plenty of support online.

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Heartland Rescue Ranch of Panama City shared a photo of a horse with a bra strapped around its face, covering its eyes, KDVR reported.

The original Facebook post has been shared more than 180,000 times since Aug. 17.

Staring at the sun is always dangerous, but even more so during an eclipse.

Missouri newlyweds say ‘I do’ during eclipse

For newlyweds Samantha and Cameron Kuhn, Monday’s marriage was out of this world.

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The couple celebrated their wedding vows with family and friends within the path of totality of the solar eclipse that crossed the United States.

“Being able to do the wedding on the day of the solar eclipse couldn’t be any more perfect,” bride Samantha Kuhn, 28, told ABC News.

Their wedding ceremony included special eclipse-viewing glasses, and their wedding invitation had a celestial theme.

After completing their vows, the bride and groom joined their guests, all wearing certified glasses, in a field behind the altar to take in the total eclipse.

Samantha Kuhn said she has been a big fan of the universe since she was in the third grade and even wanted to be an astronaut, ABC News reported.

“Once I realized the planets were out there and we were all suspended in this solar system, I couldn’t wrap my head around it but I loved that. It completely fascinated me,” she said last week.

“The coolest part about this, the eclipse is kind of like a time stamp,” Cameron Kuhn told ABC News. “It will stand out in everybody’s memories even more.”

Baby named Eclipse born in South Carolina

It was inevitable, perhaps. A baby born Monday in South Carolina was named after the Great American Eclipse.

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Eclipse Alizebeth Eubanks was born at 8:04 a.m. on Monday at Greenville Memorial Hospital, WSPA reported.

The child weighs 6 pounds, 3 ounces and is about 19 inches long, WSPA reported.

Her parents are Freedom and Michael Eubanks.

Freedom Eubanks, of Spartanburg, was not due to deliver until Sept. 3, she told ABC News.

"I kind of felt like it was meant to happen, to have her on this day," Eubanks told ABC News.

Now a mother of two, Eubanks, said she had planned to watch the eclipse with her older son, but went into labor around midnight. She originally planned to name the girl Violet, ABC News reported.

"I think it was just meant to be, her name," she told ABC News. "We're probably going to call her Clipsey."

Donald Trump looks at sun during solar eclipse, sans protective glasses

President Donald Trump ignored the advice of optometrists and scientists nationwide Monday when he squinted to look up at the sun during the 2017 solar eclipse.

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The president and first lady Melania Trump took in the eclipse with their son, Barron, on the White House’s Truman Balcony. 

The trio wore protective glasses, though Trump took his pair off long enough to squint up at the sky.

“Don’t look,” a staffer shouted as Trump grimaced, pointing toward the sun above, The Hill reported.

NASA officials and doctors warned people in the run-up to Monday’s eclipse to wear certified eclipse-viewing glasses or to take other safety precautions. Those who viewed the eclipse without glasses ran the risk of damaging their vision, including possible blindness.

Although Trump only looked at the sun protection-free for a short period of time, it didn’t slip past social media users, who quickly shared their incredulity at the president’s decision.

See updates from the solar eclipse, as they happened:

Alabama’s Nick Saban on eclipse; ‘I’ll watch it on TV’

Alabama football coach Nick Saban is not impressed with the hype surrounding Monday’s total eclipse, ESPN reported. 

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“I watch the Weather Channel every day,” Saban said Saturday after a scrimmage at Bryant-Denny Stadium. “They're already saying what it's going to look like in every city in America. So what's going to be significant? Watch the Weather Channel, and you'll see what it's going to be like in Portland, Oregon.”The solar eclipse peaks in Tuscaloosa around 1:30 p.m. Monday.

Saban said he would accommodate any players who wanted to watch the event.

“We'll set it up so if the players want to go out there and get some sunglasses,” he told ESPN. “I guess they can. That's not something that I'm really that focused on right now."

Saban said he has a lake house in Clayton, Georgia, that is in the path of totality. But he is not planning a road trip for himself or his players.

“Tell them to watch it on TV,” he said. “Maybe we should have a team meeting about how we want to do this. I haven't thought about it.”

1979 solar eclipse news report ended with wish for peace in 2017

“May the shadow of the moon fall on a world at peace.”

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Those were the words of ABC News anchorman Frank Reynolds, who covered the last total eclipse that passed over the continental United States on Feb. 21, 1979. Reynolds ended his broadcast with a hopeful message of world peace in 2017 when the next total eclipse passed over the country, People reported.

Reynolds took viewers through the various stages of the eclipse as it passed through Portland, Oregon, and Helena, Montana. Reynolds, who died in July 1983, ended his report with his optimistic hope for peace.

“So that’s it, the last solar eclipse to be seen on this continent in this century,” Reynolds said. “As I said, not until Aug. 21, 2017, will another eclipse be visible from North America. “That’s 38 years from now. May the shadow of the moon fall on a world at peace.”

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