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Former pro baseball player's son hospitalized after being hit in face with baseball

The son of former Atlanta Braves second baseman Keith Lockhart has been placed on life support after he was hit in the face by a baseball, according to media reports.

>> Read more trending news 

Jason Lockhart, 15, was hit Saturday, June 17, during a baseball tournament in South Carolina as he touched home plate. The catcher was throwing the ball back to the pitcher when it hit Jason in the face and broke his nose.

Jason originally received stitches. While at a doctor’s office for a follow-up two days later to remove the tubes and packing in his nose, his nose began to bleed uncontrollably. A CT scan showed the fracture was worse than realized and there was a tear inside his nose, The Associated Press reported. Since then, doctors were working on controlling the bleeding.

Keith Lockhart, who played with the Braves from 1997 to 2002 and is now a scout with the Chicago Cubs, has provided updates on social media and asked for prayers for his son.

Jason underwent surgery to repair the fracture in his nose, but the bleeding persisted. 

According to a Facebook post by Lockhart’s daughter, Sydney, who also has been providing updates on her brother’s condition, Jason was placed on life support Friday. 

In part, she wrote on Facebook:

“Last night they were able to put Jason into a paralytic state through meds and machines. This has helped stop any movement that could encourage or cause a bleed to begin.”

The bleeding, however, continued.

On Sunday night, Keith Lockhart wrote on Twitter that doctors at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite hospital were closing in on a possible cause for the bleeding:

Late on Sunday, Sydney Lockhart wrote on her Facebook page:

The doctors decided to take Jason into surgery to do an endovascular embolization today. They went in to his arteries and blood vessels and found the two most practical areas that could be feeding the areas where Jason has been bleeding. They went into both arteries on each side of his nose and cut off the blood supply. They are hopeful that this is the source of the bleeding. The surgery was a couple of hours long and Jason is now resting still on the ventilator to keep his vitals monitored and keep him comfortable. They will watch him for 24 hours and then he will go into surgery tomorrow to have his nose repacked and this will give them an opportunity to look back behind the packing to make sure there are no other areas bleeding. We are tired here but hopeful. The prayers and support that everyone has given to us is overwhelming and we are truly touched. Thank you so much. WE FEEL SO SURROUNDED

This article contains information from The Associated Press.

Son of Charleston church massacre victim drafted by Cubs

Nearly two years after his mother was killed by white supremacist in a South Carolina church, Chris Singleton realized his dream of playing professional baseball when the outfielder was drafted by the Chicago Cubs.

>> Read more trending news 

Singleton, a right-handed center fielder at Charleston Southern University, was chosen by the defending World Series champions with the final pick of the 19th round Wednesday (No. 585 overall). 

Singleton’s mother, Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, was one of nine people killed by Dylann Roof on June 17, 2015, during a Bible study class at Emanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston, WLTX reported. Coleman-Singleton, 45, had taught her son at Goose Creek High School and also was a pastor.

Roof was convicted of 33 federal hate crime charges and acknowledged he was hoping to incite a race war.

Despite the tragedy, Singleton continued his college baseball career. He batted .276 with four home runs for Charleston Southern this season.

“It’s a lot of God and a little bit of me right now,” Singleton told the Post and Courier of Charleston. “It’s timing itself up perfectly in my eyes, so it’s really a blessing.”

WATCH: Pujols hits 600th career home run – a grand slam

Los Angeles Angels slugger Albert Pujols has joined the 600 club. 

The 37-year-old hit his 600th home run – a grand slam – Saturday off Minnesota Twins pitcher Ervin Santana.

>> Watch the moment here

Only eight other players have crossed the 600 mark, including Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth, Alex Rodriguez, Willie Mays, Ken Griffey Jr., Jim Thome and Sammy Sosa, CBS Sports reports.

>> Read more trending news

Rodriguez congratulated Pujols in a tweet.

"Congrats @PujolsFive on No. 600," Rodriguez wrote. "You are a great ambassador to our game and all Dominicans #PlatanoPower." 

>> See the tweet here

Tony Clark, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, also lauded Pujols.

>> See the tweet here

WATCH: Bat boy interferes with Mets infielder 

A bizarre play involving a bat boy and New York infielder Wilmer Flores on Thursday led to the ejection of Mets manager Terry Collins, ESPN reported. 

>> Read more trending news

The Milwaukee Brewers were leading 2-0 in the fourth inning and had loaded the bases with one out. Eric Sogard hit a pop fly near the Brewers’ dugout and Flores chased it near the railing at Citi Field. A bat boy carrying a metal stool tried to avoid the infielder but nicked his arm, and Flores was unable to make the catch. 

"Well I'm not really sure what the rules are on that play. All I can tell you is I had the ball. I don't know what happened after that, but I had the ball. I guess that wasn't [his] intention," Flores told ESPN.

Umpires originally called Sogard out for interference but quickly huddled and reversed their ruling. Collins bolted from the bench, argued with crew chief Fieldin Culbreth and was ejected.

"My issue was, it was a routine catch. It would be one thing if it was a difficult play; that was my argument," Collins told ESPN.

WATCH: Twins’ Miguel Sano pranks coach with rubber snake

When you’re winning, being loose and having fun in the dugout is natural. The Minnesota Twins are leading the American League Central division with a 27-20 record, even after Sunday’s 8-6, 15-inning loss to the Tampa Bay Rays.

>> Read more trending news

The players are in a good mood, and so was pitching coach Neil Allen until Miguel Sano pranked him with a rubber snake in the dugout, MLB.com reported.

Allen was giving out high-fives in the dugout before Sunday’s game when Sano made his move. As Allen high-fived him, Sano handed his coach a rubber cobra. Allen’s reaction is priceless as he suddenly bolts backward in terror.

After catching his breath, Allen had a good laugh with the players.

Homer Simpson to be ‘inducted’ into Baseball Hall of Fame 

Homer Simpson will get his day at Cooperstown on Saturday as he will be inducted into “inducted” into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, 25 years after the “Homer at the Bat” episode of “The Simpsons”aired on Fox.

>> Read more trending news 

“Homer at the Bat” aired on Feb. 20, 1992, and featured the voices of Ken Griffey Jr., Wade Boggs, Ozzie Smith, Don Mattingly, Roger Clemens, Darryl Strawberry, Jose Canseco and Steve Sax, ESPN reported.

In a prepared “statement,” Simpson said it is “truly an honor for me to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame.” 

“My record for eating hot dogs will never be broken. I've been a fan for 40 years, which is how long some games take. And I can't wait for the ceremony in Canton, Ohio.”

D’oh! The Hall of Fame is in Cooperstown, not Canton (the home of the Pro Football Hall of Fame).

The episode will be shown Saturday in its entirety on an outside screen at baseball’s shrine. Simpson’s induction will include his onscreen acceptance speech, Hall of Fame officials said.

Sax, who won two World Series rings and was a five-time All-Star, said he gets asked more about his role in “The Simpsons” than about his career.

"I get asked as much about being on `The Simpsons' as I do about baseball," Sax told ESPN. "They don't want to know how it was to hit against Nolan Ryan. They want to know about being on that show."

In the episode, Simpson pinch hits for Strawberry with the bases loaded and two outs in the ninth inning. He gets hit in the head with a pitch, giving his Springfield team a 44-43 victory.

Video: Security guard criticized after ejecting Braves fan, taking ball from child

A security guard is being criticized on social media after ejecting a fan and taking a baseball from a child during an Atlanta Braves game in SunTrust Park on Wednesday night.

After Braves player Rio Ruiz hit a ball down the right field line at the bottom of the eight inning, a fan reached over the outfield wall with his glove, snagged the ball and handed the ball to a child.

Video appears to show a security guard jump over the wall and eject the fan from the stadium for interfering with live play. The security guard also told the boy that he couldn’t keep the ball he was holding, then took it from him.

After Wednesday night’s game, Braves officials contacted the boy’s family and gave him a Freddie Freeman-signed ball, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The boy was also invited back to a game to celebrate his birthday in July.

The Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Braves, 12-5 in extra innings.

There was plenty of reaction on Twitter to the incident, from media and fans who watched it unfold on their televisions.

George W. Bush photobombs sports reporter

Former President George W. Bush is enjoying his retirement, and doesn’t mind having some fun at a reporter’s expense.

>> Read more trending news

Bush was while enjoying a Texas Rangers game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Globe Life Ballpark in Arlington on Wednesday night. As he returned from a concession stand, Bush walked behind Fox Sports reporter Emily Jones, who was doing a standup segment. Bush looked into the camera and shouted “Hey” before returning to his seat.

Call it a presidential photobomb.

After Jones finished her segment, she walked over to Bush and asked if he had photobombed her, Time reported.

“Yep, I sure did,” Bush said.

"He's obviously very playful and likes to joke around. I can't even tell you what a nice man he is," Jones told Time, adding that he often asks her about her children.

Bush watched Wednesday's game from the dugout suite, which was first designed to accommodate his father, former President George H.W. Bush, and Secret Service agents, Jones said.

Tensions high, suspensions levied in Braves-Jays series

In the hours leading to the final game Thursday night in a contentious home-and-home series between the Braves and Blue Jays, fallout continued from Wednesday’s wild 8-4 win by Atlanta. It included confirmation of Freddie Freeman’s fractured wrist after being hit by a pitch, a two-game suspension for a Toronto player’s use of a homophobic slur, and more criticism of Jose Bautista for his bat-flip and stares at Braves players not at all amused by the antics.

>> Read more trending news

Toronto center fielder Kevin Pillar was suspended two games by the Blue Jays for shouting a homophobic slur at Braves reliever Jason Motte in the seventh inning, which led to the first of two benches-and-bullpens-clearing incidents (Bautista would cause the second one just an inning later). Major League Baseball is also investigating the incident and could levy further discipline.

Pillar, upset at being “quick-pitched” by Motte — Pillar struck out on the outside pitch to end the inning — shouted the slur at Motte, which was clear to anyone watching the game on television and reading Pillar’s lips, and audible to many fans in the seating sections behind home plate. Both benches and bullpens cleared as players raced onto the field, though no punches or shoving resulted before the scrum was broken up and play continued.

Pillar called Motte after the game to apologize, and on his Twitter account Pillar said he’d used “inappropriate language” and that, “By doing so I had just helped extend the use of a word that has no place in baseball, in sports or anywhere in society today. I am completely and utterly embarrassed and feel horrible to have put the organization in this position.”

Motte didn’t make himself available to reporters following the game or before Thursday’s series finale.

Pillar wrote on his Twitter account that he had “apologized personally to Jason Motte, but also need to apologize to the Braves organization and their fans, and most importantly to the LGBTQ community for the lack of respect I displayed last night.”

Part of the team’s written statement said, “The Toronto Blue Jays are extremely disappointed by the comments made by Kevin Pillar” and that “in no way is this kind of behavior accepted or tolerated, nor is it reflective of the type of inclusive organization we strive to be.” 

An inning later, Bautista repeated behavior that he has, on the other hand, become known for. With similar results as previous incidents, though he didn’t get punched like he did a year ago.

With the Braves leading 8-3 in the eighth inning, Bautista riled the Braves when he homered off Braves reliever Eric O’Flaherty and flipped his bat. As Bautista rounded first base in front of Jace Peterson, the Braves’ fill-in first baseman shouted to Bautista to let him know what Peterson thought of the bat flip and staring at O’Flaherty. Bautista briefly looked as though he were about to stop — Peterson said Thursday it would not have been pretty if Bautista had stopped — before the Blue Jays veteran continued his trot around the bases.

“That’s something that’s making the game tough to watch lately,” O’Flaherty said afterward. “It’s just turned into look-at-me stuff, it’s not even about winning anymore. Guy wants to hit a home run in a five-run game, pimp it, throw the bat around — I mean, I don’t know. It’s frustrating as a pitcher. I didn’t see it at the time, but I saw the video — he looked at me, tried to make eye contact. It’s just tired. We’ve seen it from him, though.”

This wasn’t anything quite like Bautista’s over-the-top bat flip against the Rangers in the 2015 playoffs, when he tossed it at least 20 feet in the air in the direction of the Rangers dugout. But given the game situation — Braves led by five runs and bases were empty — the flip and subsequent hard stares from Bautista irked the Braves.

When Bautista crossed home plate and stared at Kurt Suzuki, the Braves catcher stepped up and told him what he thought of the whole incident, too. As they two exchanged words, the benches and bullpens cleared again. Order was again restored without punches thrown or ejections.

After the game, O’Flaherty delivered a withering line about Bautista: “I’m surprised he’s ready to fight again after last year. But he’s throwing some looks around so … it’s what it is.”

He was referencing a famous punch May 15, 2016, when the Rangers’ Rougned Odor hit Bautista with a devastating right hand, after the Texas second baseman took offense to Bautista’s hard slide and then punished him when Bautista dared shove Odor as things escalated.

If Bautista had stopped at first base Wednesday, the stage was set for a potentially similar incident with Peterson, a former college football defensive back and linebacker who wasn’t about to back down if the situation had gone next-level.

“I’m not out looking to start a fight,” Peterson said. “But for me it’s just about situations, I think different situations you can handle the way the game’s going and do things differently. Bautista’s a great player. I don’t think he did it with intent, but he did it. At that moment it kind of triggered me. I felt like we were disrespected a little bit. Now it’s just time to go on and play baseball.”

In the first inning Thursday, Julio Teheran threw inside on the first pitch to Bautista and hit him in the thigh with the second pitch. This time, Bautista didn’t stare at the pitcher. He trotted to first base.

Former MLB star Doug DeCinces convicted of insider trading

Former major-league third baseman Doug DeCinces was convicted Friday of insider trading after a two-month trial in which he was accused of illegally using private information from a friend to net $1.3 million, the Orange County Register reported.

>> Read more trending news

DeCinces, who spent most of his 15-year career with the Baltimore Orioles and California Angels, was accused of receiving insider information from James Mazzo, a Laguna Beach neighbor who owned Santa Ana-based Advanced Medical Optics.

In turn, federal prosecutors said, DeCinces passed the inside information on to his friend, David Parker, and other DeCinces family members and acquaintances.

Jurors deliberated for four days before finding DeCinces guilty of 14 felony counts, the Register reported. Parker was convicted of three felonies.

Each count carries a potential maximum sentence of 20 years in federal prison.

DeCinces, 66, stared toward the jury, shaking his head slightly, as the guilty verdicts were read. Jurors were unable to reach a decision regarding an additional 15 counts against DeCinces, deadlocking 8-4 in favor of guilt, the Register reported.

DeCinces’ attorney, Ken Julian, said that he plans to file a motion for a new trial.

“Obviously, this is a disappointment for everybody involved,” Julian told the Register. “This is not the end.”

The judge allowed DeCinces and Parker to remain free pending sentencing after both men promised Guilford that they will return to court. A sentencing date has not been set.

DeCinces began his major-league career in Baltimore in 1973 and joined the Angels in 1982. He finished his career with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1987. He batted .259 with 237 home runs and 879 RBI during his career.

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