Now Playing
K99.1FM
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
K99.1FM

weather

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >

Number of dead rises to 8 after Florida nursing home left without power by Irma

A criminal investigation was launched as the number of deaths in a nursing home in Hollywood, Florida, increased to eight on Wednesday afternoon. The home was evacuated Wednesday morning, days after Hurricane Irma knocked out power, creating dangerous conditions for the elderly residents.

>> Read more trending news

Paramedics were called around 7:30 a.m. Wednesday to the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, WPLG reported.

The center is a 152-bed, skilled nurse facility located across the street from the Memorial Regional Hospital, according to the center’s website.

Hurricane Irma aftermath: Don't have internet, cable or cell service? Here's why

Wi-Fi and cellphone coverage remain spotty throughout South Florida and other locations along Hurricane Irma's path. There’s a simple reason: Like everyone else, the companies that provide it don’t have power, thanks to the storm.

Cell towers across Florida have been cut off from the power grid and are relying on generators to keep going, spokespeople for two of the four major wireless carriers said.

>> On PalmBeachPost.com: FPL begins full-scale post-Irma restoration, rebuild

“The faster the power comes back on, the faster all telecommunication services can get back on,” a T-Mobile spokeswoman said Tuesday. “The power outages are just everywhere. It’s definitely causing a lot of effect across the board.”

For Comcast, the main provider of Wi-Fi in Palm Beach County, it’s a similar story.

>> On PalmBeachPost.com: PHOTOS: Hurricane Irma and aftermath

“Many of our facilities in Palm Beach County, and virtually all of them in Broward County and further south in Miami-Dade, are functioning on generators due to the complete loss of commercial power,” Comcast spokeswoman Mindy Kramer said.

Physical damage to cell towers doesn’t appear to be an issue. Towers are meant to withstand high winds.

>> More Irma coverage from WFTVAction News Jax and the Palm Beach Post

“It’s really rare to see a tower topple over,” said Roni Singleton, a Sprint spokeswoman for Florida.

But because of the power outages, the lack of coverage right now is worse in South Florida, and — bizarrely — much worse than Houston recently experienced despite that city’s massive flooding from Hurricane Harvey.

>> Hurricane Irma damage: How to stay safe from tree, water damage in your home

“There was really very little loss of mobile service in Houston, across all carriers,” the T-Mobile spokeswoman said. “Houston was able to maintain power the entire time.”

Cell towers are required to have batteries that provide eight to 12 hours of power for first responders, the T-Mobile spokeswoman said. After that, they rely on generators for power. But fallen trees and debris have made it difficult to refuel some of the generators, she said.

>> How to keep your kids entertained and your sanity when trapped at home by severe weather

Verizon said close to 90 percent of its facilities were working, with many running on backup generators.

“Massive refueling operations are underway to ensure those sites without commercial power continue in service for our customers and first responders,” the company said in a statement.

>> Hurricane Irma aftermath: Power may be out for days, over a week for some in Georgia

Sprint and Comcast said they’re sending satellite trucks and mobile platforms to South Florida to provide temporary coverage until power returns. AT&T said it was sending portable cell sites to the Keys, Miami and Tallahassee.

>> Read more trending news

None of the companies would give a time frame for when full coverage would return, but T-Mobile and Sprint said coverage was getting better by the hour.

“I think by [Wednesday], we’ll see a huge improvement in the number of sites that are back up,” Singleton said. 

Hurricane Irma damage in Daytona Beach: Tourist favorite meets Atlantic's largest storm

Volusia County, Florida, residents on Monday morning awoke to toppled trees, downed power lines, flooded streets and damaged property.

>> Watch the news report here

Hurricane Irma brought howling winds and pounding rains to the county.

>> On WFTV.com: PHOTOS: Hurricane Irma damage in Volusia County

Officials urged residents to ascend to the highest floor of their homes. But for some, the rising water became too dangerous.

>> More Hurricane Irma coverage from WFTVAction News Jax and the Palm Beach Post

The Daytona Beach Fire Department said it had to evacuate people from flooded apartments along Beach Street.

The Volusia County Sheriff's Office said deputies rescued 14 people from the floodwaters.

>> Hurricane Irma damage: How to stay safe from tree, water damage in your home

The residents were taken to the city's Midtown Cultural and Education Center. No injuries were reported.

Elsewhere in the city, iconic attractions weren't spared from Irma's wrath.

>> PHOTOS: Hurricane Irma makes landfall in Florida, leaves damage behind

A large water slide at Daytona Lagoon, a popular water and amusement park, blew into an adjacent street.

Storm surge washed away beaches and left a Ponce Inlet boardwalk in ruins.

>> Read more trending news

The Daytona Beach Police Department said officers arrested a trio of burglars who were raiding a store.

Volusia County Sheriff Mike Chitwood said that he has no tolerance for looting. He said that the county would be under curfew from 10 p.m. Monday to 6 a.m. Tuesday.

>> Irma: Live updates

Daytona Beach firefighters housed at Station 1 said the kitchen ceiling caved in. They said the bays harboring the fire trucks were so heavily flooded that the vehicles had to be moved to prevent damage.

>> Watch Volusia County deputies rescue Hurricane Irma victims

Hurricane Irma aftermath: Power may be out for days, over a week for some in Georgia

More than 700,000 Georgians remained without power Tuesday night because of Hurricane Irma, which weakened to a tropical storm by the time it reached the Peach State.

>> Watch the news report here

Georgia Power reported more than 425,000 customers in the dark. Georgia EMC said it had close to 300,000 customers without power. Both of those numbers are down significantly since the storm hit Monday, when 1.5 million were dealing with an outage.

The numbers are constantly changing as crews work to restore power in many neighborhoods.

>> For the latest numbers, head to WSBTV.com

“Every region in the state has been affected, and it's going to take time for us to get back to normal in terms of power restoration,” Georgia Power CEO Paul Bowers said in a news conference Tuesday.

Crews are working around the clock to restore power. Georgia EMC utilities brought in 3,000 crew members from 13 states to help out.

>> Irma: Live updates

"We are doing everything we can to restore it," Jackson EMC lineman Jose Salgado said.

“This is where all people within the company really pull together. Everybody has an obligation and duty as a Georgia Power employee and everybody has a storm role and responsibility," Georgia Power spokesman Jacob Hawkins told WSB-TV's Aaron Diamant.

>> Read more trending news

Inside the company's command center in downtown Atlanta on Tuesday, staff worked to ensure the right resources were in the right places, but Hawkins said this won't be a quick process.

“As we go through today and tomorrow, we will have a better idea about the damage and the estimates. We will be bringing some customers back, but it may take a couple more days; it may take over a week to get customers back on," he said.

>> More Hurricane Irma coverage from WFTVAction News Jax and the Palm Beach Post

Georgia EMC's district engineering coordinator Bennie Bagwell said they're hoping to have all their power restored by Thursday.

If you are a Georgia Power customer, you can check on your outage or report an outage through their outage map on their website. Georgia EMC customers can find more information on their website.

>> On WSBTV.com: Georgia Gov. Deal to Hurricane Irma evacuees: Don't go home until it's safe

"This is one where the entire state of Georgia has been affected by this hurricane/tropical storm. And as a result of that, recovery is going to be a little more slow because there are greater territories that have to be covered before anything can be back to a normal environment,” Gov. Nathan Deal said Tuesday.

Hurricane Irma damage: How to stay safe from tree, water damage in your home

If you have damage to your home from a tree or water, there are certain steps you need to take to stay safe.

>> Watch the news report here

On Tuesday, WSB-TV’s Craig Lucie spoke with officials from a heating and electrical company who said there are hidden dangers like live wires in your home and carbon monoxide triggers that need to be dealt with immediately.

>> Irma: Live updates

There are trees down everywhere and while you know to stay away from downed power lines, there could also be live wires inside your home from trees falling.

>> Keep the butter, toss the eggs: What to keep, throw away if you lost power after Irma

“If you've had a tree come down on your home, nine out of 10 times you will have damage to the infrastructure on your home so wires could be pulled loose, certain connections could be broken (including) live wire you don't know about it,” said Daniel Jape, the president of Reliable Heating and Air.

>> How to keep your kids entertained and your sanity when trapped at home by severe weather

Jape met with Lucie in their call center where they were busy fielding calls from people with storm damage.

More Irma coverage from WSBTV.com:

>> Here is the damage Tropical Storm Irma has caused in Georgia>> 55-year-old man killed when tree falls on home>> VIDEO: Large tree nearly lands on woman driving down road

“If a part of your heating unit is located in the basement or in a crawl space, what you want to do is a visual inspection. You don’t need to go all the way in there but if you see there is some standing water, you need to call a heat and air conditioning company to come out there and inspect it,” Jape explained.

If you try to fix it yourself, it can be extremely dangerous.

>> More Irma coverage from WFTVAction News Jax and the Palm Beach Post

“If you are standing in water and plug something in and the outlet is wet, you can create a direct short. Electricity will flow from the outlet, into you and into the water and you could essentially cause death,” he said.

>> Hurricane Irma damage: What to do during, after a power outage

Jape also said since wires to your home are hidden in the walls, if you try and plug something in an outlet, the wire could catch fire, setting the insulation on fire and next thing you know, your home could be engulfed in flames.

>> Read more trending news

He also says if a tree or branch came down near your HVAC system outside, call a professional.

“Things can hit those pipes and break them at home or inside house. They can even have carbon monoxide buildup in there,” he said.

Irma: Live updates

Search and rescue operations continue in Florida in the wake of Hurricane Irma. 

>> Read more trending news

Authorities worked to restore communication with the island residents and began work Monday on reopening the single highway that connects the islands to the mainland.

Irma was downgraded to a tropical storm Monday evening. By Tuesday, it was downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone. At least 17 people have died in the contiguous U.S. 

Power is beginning to be restored in Florida and Georgia.

>>Minute-by-minute updates to this post have ceased. For the latest Hurricane Irma news: 

JACKSONVILLE - ActionNewsJax

ORLANDO-WFTV

PALM BEACH - Palm Beach Post

ATLANTA - WSBTV 

ATLANTA - AJC

6 scary, infectious illnesses you can catch from flood water 

Hurricanes can leave behind tons of damage, including flooding, but did you know treading through the wrong kind of water can cause illnesses and even death?

>> Read more trending news

Floodwaters and standing water are often contaminated, posing several risks, such as infectious diseases, chemical hazards and injuries.

Here are six sicknesses you should beware of in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma

Diarrheal diseases

Drinking or eating anything that has come in contact with floodwaters can lead to cryptosporidiosis, E. coli or giardiasis. While cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are brought on by parasites, E. coli is caused by bacteria.

>> Related: Irma: Live updates

Symptoms from each include diarrhea, gas, nausea and vomiting. Cryptosporidiosis, however, can even be fatal for those with weakened immune systems, such as AIDS or cancer. 

Wound infections

Open wounds and rashes that are exposed to flood water can cause tetanus or Vibrio vulnificus. Tetanus is a bacterial infection, and it can enter the body through breaks in the skin like a cut.

Vibrio vulnificus, another bacteria, can be contracted the same way. Many people become infected by consuming undercooked shellfish or exposing an injury to brackish or salt water.

>> Related: First responder contracts deadly bacteria in Harvey floodwaters, ends up in ICU

Other illnesses 

People affected by flooded areas can also get trench foot. It occurs when your feet are wet for long periods of time. It can cause pain, swelling and numbness.

You should also be aware of chemical hazards from materials that may have spilled into the water. And be cautious of electrical hazards, since there are puddles that may be electrified due to fallen power lines.

Curious about other diseases you can catch. Take a look at the full list at CDC’s official website.

 

How to keep your kids entertained and your sanity when trapped at home by severe weather

When severe weather traps you inside your home with your children, whether in the aftermath of a hurricane or during less severe bad weather and power outages, there are things you can do to keep kids entertained while you keep your sanity.

>> Read more trending news

If you're home for the day, or a few days, here are a few things you can do to stay entertained without going crazy or running up your data plans.

If you still have power:

Do some family-friendly baking:

One way to keep kids occupied is with a slew of simple cooking tasks (cracking eggs, manning the mixing bowl) and the promise of sweets.

Cooking Light has a roundup of “kid-friendly desserts,” including gluten-free s'more bars, chewy caramel apple cookies and more. If you run through that list, the Food Network has another.

And not having kids is no reason not to bake in bad weather: for company, just sub in the closet available roommates, family, friends or pets. (This advice applies to the rest of the list.)

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: What to do about fallen trees and how to stop the danger

Check out these party games:

Jackbox's Drawful is a bizarre twist on Pictionary: players score points not just for drawing the best possible version of, say, "angry ants"; but also for getting other players to guess their answer for a given drawing instead of the correct one.

Drawful comes packaged as part of the Jackbox Party Pack and is available to buy and download here, and is compatible with the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Amazon Fire TV and others. All you need to play is a phone, tablet or controller. 

But if you're feeling more competitive and less artistic, consider QuizUp. Available for both iPhone and Android. This competitive trivia app pits two players against each other in seven rounds of questions in one of several hundred different categories, including pop culture and academia. And it's free. 

Get crafty:

Create a crafting area in your home. Fill it with crafting materials like tape, paper and boxes. When inspiration strikes your child, they can create fun things in their own “workshop.”

Without power:

Get clever:

When the house goes dark, kids’ imaginations light up. A trip to the bathroom with a flashlight can become an adventure, and reading stories by candlelight will stick with them more than just another movie night. 

Get ahead of a power outage:

Stock up on glow sticks. Kids can really have fun with these simple light sticks. Once you crack them, they provide a bright light for up to 12 hours and a dim light for as long as 36 hours. They come in all kinds of shapes, sizes and colors, and can provide hours of fun for children.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma aftermath: Drone video shows St. Augustine damage

Build a fort:

Kids love building forts just for fun anyway. So if you find yourself in the dark without power, gather up pillows and blankets, and plan on moving some furniture around to help your little ones build the perfect fortress. You can even make it more like an adventure. Plan to snuggle in for the night, and maybe tell a few ghost stories, too.

Hurricane Irma damage: What to do about fallen trees and how to stop the danger

Hurricane Irma, once a Category 5 monster with record-breaking 185-mph winds, weakened to a tropical storm as it plowed through parts of the Southeast after leaving Florida on Monday.

>> Read more trending news

The storm killed more than 40 people in the Caribbean and Florida, and at least three people were killed in Georgia, two crushed by falling trees.

Millions of people were left in the dark, as the storm toppled trees and power lines across parts of the Southeast.

If you’re experiencing tree damage following the tropical storm, here are expert tips on tree safety, removal and more: 

>> Related: Of your neighbor’s tree falls in your yard, who pays for it?

Signs of tree danger

  • Dead branches or branches barely hanging by a thread
  • Insect infestations
  • Hollowing inside the tree
  • Leaking sap
  • Cracks in the lower trunk or large stems split from the tree
  • Severed or broken roots
  • Noticeable tree lean after a storm

>> Related: Hurricane Irma damage: What to do before, during and after a flood

What to do if a tree falls on your property and who to call for help

Do not attempt to self-clean.

According to Ryan Smith of Monster Tree Service, this is one of the most dangerous mistakes people make after a tree causes damage on their property.

“So many people get hurt after a storm because they get on the roof to try and fix the damage themselves and slip and fall,” he said. “Our experts won’t even do that without the proper equipment.”

Stay away from the damaged areas.

If you walk on compromised areas, such as near downed power lines, the repercussions could be quite dangerous, Smith said.

Immediately call a tree removal service, but avoid getting scammed.

You want to find a tree removal company that not only carries insurance, but specifically includes workers’ compensation.

This is because the biggest risk during tree removal is someone getting damaged on property, Smith said.

When calling the company, ask for certificates and proof of liability insurance and workers’ compensation.

>> Related: Photos: Hurricane Irma damage in Florida Keys

Remember to look out for any unsolicited offers and too-good-to-be-true bargains. It’s always best to double check references and read reviews.

Be sure to sign a written agreement before the work, and unless it’s just a small deposit, there’s no reason to pay up front.

Read more here.

If your neighbor's tree falls in your yard, who pays for cleanup?

If a tree falls in your yard, what you do next could save you money, a limb and maybe even your life.

>> Read more trending news 

According to Trees Atlanta, the metro area has the nation's highest "urban tree canopy," defined as the layer of leaves, branches and stems of trees that cover the ground when viewed from above.

During the stormy summer months, fallen trees are fixtures in metro Atlanta's landscape. The steps you take after a tree falls can mean the difference between headache and heartache.

The first thing to do is call your homeowners insurance agent, said Bob Delbridge, owner of 404-Cut-Tree, one of the largest tree service companies in the Atlanta area.

"Occasionally we will deal directly with the insurance company. But that's more likely if there is a storm that covers a large area, like a whole neighborhood." Delbridge said. "Typically, the homeowner deals with their own insurance company."

Where the tree falls determines who pays for what. "Almost everyone is surprised when we tell them, the way the law works is, wherever the tree landed, that person is responsible for dealing with it regardless of where the tree came from."

That's right, even if the tree is rooted in your neighbor's yard, if it crashes onto your property, it's your problem.

Once the insurance agent gives the green light, the homeowner is responsible for hiring contractors. Homeowners can save money cutting up the tree themselves and then hiring someone to simply remove logs and branches. However, unless skilled with a chainsaw, owners should leave tree removal to professionals, Delbridge said.

"Typically, if the homeowners are out there with chainsaws, we'll talk to them about some basic safety information. This might save somebody's leg," he said. "There are just very easy steps to take that could really minimize injuries."

He recommends people wear protective chapssafety glasses and other gear.

"It's a federal law that commercial tree cutters wear chaps whenever they handle chainsaws on the ground. All the established companies do this," Delbridge said. "The most common injury caused by the chainsaw is an injury to the leg."

These chaps are available at retailers like Lowe's and online. "They are made of material that will stop the chainsaw blade even when it's turning at full speed without even bruising your skin." he said. "Protective glasses will help you avoid eye injuries from flying splinters."

Cutting up a fallen tree is not a DIY project for amateurs. "They might avoid paying the tree cutter some money, but they'll probably end up paying the emergency room," Delbridge said. "It's very dangerous to cut trees, and storm situations are the most dangerous. It really depends on the skill of the owner."

Even those skilled with power tools need to take precautions before tackling a fallen tree. "Whenever trees are down, the first thing to do is look for power lines." Delbridge said. "Believe it or not, trees conduct electricity, and every year there are so many people that are electrocuted by touching a branch that is also touching a live power line."

Delbridge cautioned homeowners to be wary of branches that may be bent beneath a fallen tree. "They can really have a powerful spring effect. Another common injury happens when someone cuts a branch and the tree jumps because they've reduced the weight, and the tree falls on someone. They could lose a leg or their life."

Lataunya Tilstra, an insurance agent with New York Life, said depending on the extent of damage, a homeowner might need several contractors to finish the job. One of her neighbors recently had a tree fall on her house.

"She had to call the tree service first. Then she needed a roofer, and she'll need a builder to rebuild the part of her house that was damaged. So she has several moving parts."

Speaking of insurance claims, most policies cover only damage if the tree falls on a part of the home. "Sometimes the fallen tree can cover your whole yard, and they're not going to help you with a dime of it unless it's actually on a patio, the fence, house or garage," said Corey Cargle, owner of Steve's Tree and Landscape Service in Atlanta.

"I had one homeowner's insurance company turn one of my customers down for a tree that was hit by lightning. It was uprooting, splitting, leaning all over her house and was ready to fall. But they would not approve of any preventive work to remove the tree before it damaged the home," Cargle said. "They basically told (the homeowner) to take care of it or it would be negligent because she knew the tree was about to fall. In hindsight, the homeowner should have waited and let the tree fall on the house I guess, and saved themselves thousands. Insurance companies can be rough."

Cargle recommends you take plenty of pictures. "If it leaves your property and hits someone's home, car or anything else, it's off you. It becomes their tree. A lot of people call us and say, ‘Hey, this tree fell from my neighbors house into our yard, and I want you to give us an estimate and we'll give it to them,’ but it doesn't work like that."

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >