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Howard commencement to feature "Black Panther" Boseman

The "Black Panther" is returning to his alma mater to give the commencement address at Howard University.

The university announced Wednesday that Chadwick Boseman will give the keynote address at Howard's 150th commencement ceremony on May 12.

News outlets report Boseman will be presented with an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, the university's highest honor.

Howard University President Wayne Frederick said his role in the blockbuster "Black Panther" film "reminds us of the excellence found in the African diaspora and how Howard continues to be a gem that produces the next generation of artist-scholars, humanitarians, scientists, engineers and doctors."

The South Carolina native also starred in movies portraying Jackie Robinson, James Brown and fellow Howard graduate Thurgood Marshall.

'I Feel Pretty' star Amy Schumer recalls losing her confidence as 10-year-old

The guy really got into Amy Schumer’s head. Here she was full of confidence and spunk, and he had to make a deflating remark.

>> Read more trending news

“I was 10 years old, which is kind of late. That’s kind of lucky, to hang onto your confidence until you’re 10,” she said during a recent interview to discuss “I Feel Pretty,” which opens in theaters Friday. “It was a guy I was friends with. He said, ‘You have a big butt.’ I was like, ‘I do?’ It didn’t occur to me that people had different bodies. That’s a learned thing. I remember him saying that to me and me accepting it as fact.”

In “I Feel Pretty,” Schumer plays Renee Bennett, a young woman struggling with self-esteem, an empty dance card and a job going nowhere. When she’s magically transformed into a gorgeous knockout, she suddenly commands every room with confidence, finds a great boyfriend and sees her career take off.

Here’s the catch, though. Renee actually looks the same to everyone else; a conk on the head has left only her seeing herself differently. And her supposed outer beauty summons some inner ugliness.

During the interview with Schumer, she talked about relating to her character and the serious message the comedy imparts.

Q: How do you relate to Renee?

A: I’ve been there. I’m not done being there. I’ve had long periods of time, especially in college, where I didn’t understand at all where my worth came from and it seemed like it was all about being attractive. I was lucky that I realized quickly that’s not what it’s about at all. I still have those days. When I was playing her (having) really low self-esteem, that was tough, being that vulnerable. The confident stuff was really kind of fun, and good for me.

Q: One lively scene in “I Feel Pretty” involves Renee’s impromptu performance at a bikini beauty pageant, where she owns the stage and the crowd. How many takes did that involve?

A: I definitely did that dance 10 times. It’s my fault. I was supposed to just stand there and pose in a bikini and I was like, “No, this is a really empowering moment. I want a choreographer.” I think we pulled it off.

Q: What’s your message for people constantly checking their appearances to ensure they look perfect?

A: You just want to fast-forward them to their late 30s. I feel the best when I’m just hanging out with my family and friends, just laughing.

Q: Early in “I Feel Pretty,” Renee drops a coin into a fountain and wishes for beauty. If there was a magic fountain you could make a wish in, and change something about your personality or add a skill, superpower or some ability, what sort of non physical gift would you wish for?

A: Patience. I have a low threshold. I’m really efficient. I don’t even like when you call the bank and they go, “Hi, thank you for calling” and the whole run-through. I just start saying my number. To work in this business and do the jobs that I’ve been doing, you really have to be selective with your energy.

Q: Who do you look to for guidance and inspiration?

A: My sister and also people I see on the street. When I see people on the street, they say, “Keep going.” Maybe they mean I should keep walking. I’m not looking to please everyone. I wouldn’t be so outspoken about how I feel about things if I was. If I’m making a difference and these people want to encourage me to keep going, that really means a lot to me.

Q: The movie’s cast includes legendary supermodels Naomi Campbell and Lauren Hutton, who became famous when there was more distance between celebrities and the public. Talk about the difference in how things are now.

A: It’s as if you’re a politician. People want to know your feelings about everything, and it has to be the whole package. They look to burn you if you get to a certain level in the public eye. It’s like everybody wants people to get burned at the stake and taken down. It’s so out of your hands it doesn’t feel like something you can try and curate or control. That’s kind of freeing.

Q: Given how busy you are, how do you carve out time for yourself to recharge?

A: Long walks with my dog. Sex. And boxing. Boxing’s so good. You just feel so chill the rest of the day. And acupuncture. Just being physically well.

A Dayton sandwich so good you’ll say: ‘Pork Lord, have mercy’

A Dayton restaurant has three little piggies you are going to want battling the wolf in your belly. 

Fifth Street Brewpub, 1600 E. Fifth St. in Dayton’s St. Anne’s Hill neighborhood, might be best known for its beer. But the kitchen brews up some delicious grub, too.

>> Fifth Street Brewpub captures two golds in beer competition (July 11, 2016)

One particular sandwich stands out from the rest for a very piggy reason. 

>> 9 must-try sandwiches in Dayton

It is called the Pork Lord, and it had me at the words “pork” and “lord.” 

The sandwich is full of porky goodness, as you can imagine. But it will not leave you feeling like a pig. 

The $10 dish is a well-portioned combination of thin-ish sliced pork, bacon horseradish aioli and seasoned in-house pork rinds (called Crack–A–Lackin’s on the menu) on the side. 

Besides the ham and bacon, the anything but simple sandwich includes lettuce, tomato, onion, a fried egg and ghost pepper jack cheese on a telera roll. 

>> Fifth Street Brewpub release new menu (Feb. 9, 2018) 

>> Your ULTIMATE guide to the best burgers in Dayton

Don’t let the ghost pepper scare you off. 

The sandwich has just the right amount of heat for those of us who love a little kick with supper. 

The egg was cooked to perfection with plenty of delicious runny yolk to sop up. 

The yolk flowed like lava when I cut into my Pork Lord. 

The sandwich is cheesy, bacon-ey, eggy and spicy goodness. 

>> These beefy burgers are well worth the drive east on I-70

>>  Guess how much Fifth Street Brewpub’s weekly giveback night has raised for local charities? (July 31, 2017)

The Pork Lord was added to Fifth Street’s menu in February. 

Tanya Brock, Fifth Street’s manager, said the Pork Lord has become a customer favorite and will remain on the menu for a while going forward. 

An order of thick and crunchy Crack-A-Lackin’s are $6 as an appetizer if you don’t want to go all hog wild. 

WANT TO TRY IT?

What: The Pork Lord: lettuce, tomato, onion,  ham, fried egg, ghost pepper jack cheese, bacon horseradish aioli on a telera roll. The sandwich is served with Crack-A-Lackins, the brewpub’s house-made pork rinds. 

Where: Fifth Street Brewpub, 1600 E. Fifth St. in Dayton’s St. Anne’s Hill neighborhood

Hours: 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 11 a.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays. 

Connect:  Facebook Website | Phone: (937) 443-0919

Cost: $10 

Brand new IHOP has everything but employees, customers and an unlocked front door. What’s the holdup?

The parking lot is striped, the brand-new chairs are neatly stacked atop the brand-new dining tables, the occupancy permit has been obtained. The only things missing are employees, customers, an unlocked front door — and a short stack of pancakes or two. 

The IHOP restaurant that was built last fall and this winter at 3324 Benchwood Road near the Miller Lane/York Commons development in Vandalia is all revved up and ready to go, but it still has not opened. And no one is saying exactly why. 

>> Here’s a first look at the new Asian restaurant that opens Friday at The Greene

Messages were left with a spokeswoman for IHOP corporate, the CEO of the company that is acting as area developer for IHOP in the region and with a franchise owner-operator of the Dayton-area IHOP restaurants in Beavercreek, Huber Heights and Springfield. Those messages have not been returned. 

>> RELATED: IHOP restaurants returning to Dayton area (October 2014)

A spokeswoman for Las Cruces, New Mexico-based PDG/Prestige Development Group, the development company that has overseen development of the other three Dayton-Springfield IHOPs, told this news outlet in January that the restaurant was scheduled to open in early February. In late January, the spokeswoman revised the opening date to mid-March. Last week, on April 13, the same spokeswoman said, “I don’t yet have a date” for the restaurant’s opening.

>> ‘Too much competition’ forces Miamisburg restaurant to close

Rich Hopkins, a spokesman for the city of Vandalia, said there are no hangups from the city’s perspective, and city officials have not been notified of the reasons for the delay. In fact, the restaurant received its occupancy permit from the city — usually the final or nearly final bureaucratic step necessary before a retail establishment’s opening — on Feb. 2.

Potential customers are getting curious and a bit impatient.

“I get inquiries on it all the time by community members and business people,” said Will Roberts, president and CEO of the Vandalia-Butler Chamber of Commerce. An employee of the Frisch’s restaurant across the street said she is asked about the dormant-but-brand-new restaurant by many of her customers. 

>>RELATED: IHOP moves ahead with Dayton-area expansion plans (January 2016)

If or when the restaurant does open, IHOP will have doubled its Miami Valley footprint since last summer as part of the chain’s re-entry into the Dayton-area market. An IHOP opened Sept. 5, 2017 at 7611 Old Troy Pike in Huber Heights.  

>>RELATED: New Dayton-area IHOP now open, another location on the way

IHOP opened the first of what had been projected to be as many as seven IHOP locations in the region in October 2015 on North Fairfield Road in Beavercreek, and the second one in October 2016 on Bechtle Avenue in Springfield.

>>RELATED: IHOP opening two more Dayton-area locations (December 2016)

The region had multiple IHOP locations in the 1970s and 1980s, including one near Ohio 725 and Ohio 741 near the Dayton Mall and one on Shiloh Springs Road near the former Salem Mall, but those restaurants closed nearly three decades ago.

Berlin councilwoman wants to shut legendary Berghain club

A nationalist councilwoman in Berlin has been ridiculed online for proposing the closure of one the city's most famous techno clubs because of its long opening hours as well as partygoers' drug consumption and lascivious behavior on the dance floor.

Sibylle Schmidt, a district councilor for the far-right Alternative for Germany party, demanded that a future owner of the Berghain club should install "better lighting and staff to prevent sexual acts" inside. She said it should open only from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. to protect revelers' health, instead of offering all-weekend raves.

She also complained about the club's "unintelligent, ugly" bouncers.

Using the hashtag #berghain, Twitter users made fun of the proposal and compared Schmidt's agenda to that of "hardcore Islamists."

The proposal is unlikely to be approved.

Dubai film festival to become biennial, skipping this year

The Dubai International Film Festival says it will skip holding the event this year, instead becoming biennial and reconvening in 2019.

The film festival made the announcement late on Wednesday night, saying the decision came in part over "the vast changes taking place both in the regional and global movie-making and content industry."

The film festival began in 2004 and has hosted stars from Hollywood, Bollywood and Arabic films.

In recent years, however, the festival has lost some its luster.

The National, a state-linked English-language newspaper in Abu Dhabi, reported on Thursday that "several key staff have already been relieved of their positions" at the film festival.

The newspaper also noted that Dubai's one-time Gulf Film Festival similarly announced a biennial strategy in 2014, "never to be heard of again."

First Saudi cinema opens with popcorn and 'Black Panther'

The lights dimmed and the crowd of men and women erupted into applause and hoots as Hollywood's blockbuster "Black Panther" premiered in Saudi Arabia's first movie theater.

Though it was a private, invitation-only screening on Wednesday evening, for many Saudis it marked one of the clearest moments of change to sweep the country in decades.

It's seen as part of a new era in which women will soon be allowed to drive and people in the kingdom will be able to go to concerts and fashion shows, and tuck into a bucket of popcorn in a cinema.

"It's a new era, a new age. It's that simple. Things are changing, progress is happening. We're opening up and we're catching up with everything that's happening in the world," said Rahaf Alhendi, who attended the showing.

Authorities said the public would be able to purchase tickets online on Thursday for showings starting Friday. But there may be delays.

Movies screened in Saudi cinemas will be subject to approval by government censors, and Wednesday night's premiere was no exception. Scenes of violence were not cut, but a final scene involving a kiss was axed.

Still, it's a stark reversal for a country where public movie screenings were banned in the 1980s during a wave of ultraconservatism that swept Saudi Arabia. Many Saudi clerics view Western movies and even Arabic films made in Egypt and Lebanon as sinful.

Despite decades of ultraconservative dogma, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has pushed through a number of major social reforms with support from his father, King Salman, to satiate the desires of the country's majority young population.

"This is a historic day for your country," Adam Aron, CEO of AMC Entertainment, told the crowd at the screening. "It's been about 37 years since you've been able to watch movies the way movies are meant to be watched in a theater, together on a big screen."

U.S.-based AMC, one of the world's biggest movie theater operators, only two weeks earlier signed a deal with Prince Mohammed to operate the first cinema in the kingdom. AMC and its local partner hurriedly transformed a concert hall in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, into a cinema complex for Wednesday's screening.

Aron said the company plans to rip out the current concert-style seats and replace them with plush leather recliners and build three more screens in the complex to accommodate up to 5,000 movie-goers a day.

Samer Alsourani traveled from Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province for the event. He commended the crown prince for following through on his promises to modernize the country.

"This is the first time that we really see something that's really being materialized," he said.

The social reforms undertaken by the 32-year-old heir to the throne are part of his so-called Vision 2030, a blueprint for Saudi Arabia that aims to boost local spending and create jobs amid sustained lower oil prices.

The Saudi government projects that the opening of movie theaters will contribute more than 90 billion riyals ($24 billion) to the economy and create more than 30,000 jobs by 2030. The kingdom says there will be 300 cinemas with around 2,000 screens built by 2030.

AMC has partnered with a subsidiary of Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund, known as the Public Investment Fund, to build up to 40 AMC cinemas across the country over the next five years.

Saudi Arabia had already started gradually loosening restrictions on movie screenings in the past few years, with local film festivals and screenings in makeshift theaters. For the most part, though, until now Saudis who wanted to watch a film in a movie theater had to drive to nearby Bahrain or the United Arab Emirates for weekend trips to the cinema.

In the 1970s, there were informal movie screenings but the experience could be interrupted by the country's religious police, whose powers have since been curbed.

Jamal Khashoggi, a dissident Saudi writer, describes the theaters of the 1970s as being "like American drive-ins, except much more informal." In an opinion piece for The Washington Post, he wrote that a friend once broke his leg at a screening in Medina when he jumped off a wall to escape the religious police and avoid arrest.

By the 1980s, movie screenings were largely banned unless they took place in private residential compounds for foreigners or at cultural centers run by foreign embassies.

Access to streaming services, such as Netflix, and satellite TV steadily eroded attempts by the government to censor what the Saudi public could view. By 2013, the film "Wadjda" made history by becoming the first Academy Award entry for Saudi Arabia, though it wasn't nominated for the Oscars.

To adhere to the kingdom's norms on gender segregation, certain screenings may be held for families and others for male-only crowds. But, generally movie theaters will not be gender segregated with "family sections" for women and related men and separate "single sections" for male-only crowds as is customary at restaurants and cafes.

Saudi Minister of Culture and Information Awwad Alawwad told The Associated Press the government aims to strike a balance between the country's Islamic mores and people's movie experiences.

"We want to ensure the movies are in line with our culture and respect for values. Meanwhile, we want to provide people with a beautiful show and really enjoy watching their own movies," he said.

The new movie theater also came equipped with prayer rooms to accommodate the daily Muslim prayer times.

___

Associated Press writer Malak Harb in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, contributed to this report.

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Aya Batrawy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ayaelb .

Cosby team turns to star witness with drug experts on deck

Bill Cosby's lawyers turned to their star witness in the comedian's sexual assault retrial, countering the harrowing accounts of a half-dozen accusers with a woman who says chief accuser Andrea Constand mused about framing a celebrity in hopes of a big payday.

Temple University academic adviser Marguerite Jackson took the witness stand the same day jurors heard Cosby's explosive deposition testimony about giving quaaludes, the since-banned 1970s party drug, to women before sex.

The jury is expected to hear from a pair of drug experts on Thursday.

The prosecution's expert, Dr. Timothy Rohrig, testified at Cosby's last trial that wooziness and other effects Constand described could have been caused by quaaludes or Benadryl, the over-the-counter cold medication Cosby claims he gave her.

Quaaludes have been illegal in the U.S. since 1982. That is the year Cosby accuser Janice Baker-Kinney alleges he knocked her out with pills she suspected to be quaaludes and then raped her.

Cosby, in the 2005 deposition read to jurors by a police detective, said he used quaaludes "the same as a person would say, 'Have a drink.'"

"Quaaludes happen to be the drug that kids, young people were using to party with, and there were times when I wanted to have them just in case," Cosby said in the deposition, given in 2005 and 2006 after Constand sued him.

Cosby's testimony was hidden from public view until The Associated Press petitioned to have it unsealed in 2005. That led prosecutors to reopen the criminal case and file charges.

Jurors at Cosby's first trial also heard excerpts from the deposition.

In the transcript read to the jury, the "Cosby Show" star said he obtained seven prescriptions for quaaludes from his doctor in Los Angeles in the 1970s, ostensibly for a sore back, but added he did not use them himself because they made him tired.

Jackson testified that Constand, Temple's women's basketball operations director, spoke to her on a February 2004 road trip to Rhode Island about fabricating sexual assault allegations against a high-profile person so she could "get that money" from a lawsuit.

After watching a TV news report about a celebrity who had been sued over allegations of sexual assault, Jackson said, Constand told her: "Oh, wow, something similar happened to me." Constand said she never reported the assault because her assailant was a "high-profile person" and she knew she couldn't prove it, Jackson testified.

Jackson, who said she roomed with Constand on the trip, told jurors that she encouraged Constand to come forward. She testified that Constand then switched gears, saying, "No, it didn't, but I could say it did. I could say it happened, get that money. I could quit my job. I could go back to school. I could open up a business."

Jackson's account was immediately challenged by prosecutors, who suggested she was not on the trip on which she says her conversation with Constand took place.

Jackson's appearance on the witness stand was one of the most highly anticipated moments of a retrial that has Cosby, 80, defending himself against criminal charges that he knocked Constand out with pills and then sexually assaulted her at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. Cosby paid Constand nearly $3.4 million in 2006, and his lawyers call her a "con artist" who set him up.

Jackson said a comedian she met on a cruise put her in touch with Cosby's lawyers in November 2016. They got to talking about Cosby after the comedian offered to buy her a drink and promised, "I won't put anything in it," she recalled.

Judge Steven O'Neill blocked Jackson from taking the stand at Cosby's first trial last year, ruling her testimony would be hearsay after Constand told the jury that she did not know her. That trial ended without a verdict after jurors deadlocked. The judge changed his mind about Jackson for the retrial, giving the defense case a huge boost.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

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Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak.

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For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial.

2 years after Prince's death, prosecutor to update probe

Prosecutors in the Minnesota county where Prince died will announce a decision on criminal charges following a two-year investigation into the music superstar's death from an accidental fentanyl overdose.

Carver County Attorney Mark Metz scheduled an 11:30 a.m. news conference Thursday to announce whether anyone would be charged.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate in suburban Chanhassen on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin.

A confidential toxicology report obtained by The Associated Press in March showed high concentrations of fentanyl in the singer's blood, liver and stomach. The concentration of fentanyl in Prince's blood was 67.8 micrograms per liter, which outside experts called "exceedingly high." The report noted that fatalities have been documented in people with blood levels ranging from 3 to 58 micrograms per liter.

Search warrants unsealed about a year after Prince died showed that authorities searched his home, cellphone records of associates and his email accounts to try to determine how he got the drug. Authorities found numerous pills in various containers stashed around Prince's home, including some counterfeit pills that contained fentanyl. The source of that fentanyl was never determined.

While many who knew Prince over the years said he had a reputation for clean living, some said he also struggled with pain after years of intense performances. Documents released by authorities last year paint a picture of a man struggling with an addiction to prescription opioids and withdrawal, and they also show there were efforts to get him help.

Associates at Paisley Park told investigators that Prince had been "going through withdrawals, which are believed to be the result of the abuse of prescription medication," according to an affidavit unsealed in state court last year.

Just six days before he died, Prince passed out on a plane and an emergency stop was made in Moline, Illinois. The musician had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose.

The day before his death, Paisley Park staffers contacted California addiction specialist Dr. Howard Kornfeld as they were trying to get Prince help. Kornfeld sent his son, Andrew, to Minnesota that night and the younger Kornfeld was among those who found Prince's body. Andrew Kornfeld was carrying buprenorphine, a medication that can be used to help treat opioid addiction.

Documents also alleged Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg, a family physician who saw the musician twice before his death, told authorities he prescribed the opioid painkiller oxycodone to Prince but put it under the name of Prince's bodyguard and close friend Kirk Johnson "for Prince's privacy." Schulenberg's attorney has disputed that.

A laboratory report obtained by the AP notes that one of the pills found in a prescription bottle with Johnson's name contained oxycodone.

Oxycodone, the generic name for the active ingredient in OxyContin, was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. But it is part of a family of painkillers driving the nation's overdose and addiction epidemic, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 2 million Americans abused or were addicted to prescription opioids, including oxycodone, in 2014.

Prince did not have any prescriptions for fentanyl.

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti . More of her work is at: https://apnews.com/search/amy%20forliti .

Charges could be announced in Prince opioid investigation two years after his death

Authorities in Carver County, Minnesota, could announce charges Thursday in the investigation into the opioid-related death of legendary entertainer Prince two years after he died, according to news outlets.

>> Read more trending news 

Prince was found unresponsive at his Paisley Park home in Chanhassen on April 21, 2016, and was later pronounced dead.

An autopsy report by the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office was released two months later and called Prince’s death “accidental.” The cause was listed as “fentanyl toxicity,” according to Entertainment Tonight, and the drug was “self-administered.”

According to news reports at the time, prescription drugs were found at the musician’s Paisley Park home and in his possession when he died.

Some of the bottles of prescription painkillers found at Paisley Park were in the name of a longtime friend of Prince and were prescribed by a doctor the “Purple Rain” singer saw before he died.

>> Related: Remembering Prince: 5 most memorable tributes

It’s unclear if anyone is facing charges at this point.

Carver County Attorney Mark Metz is holding a press conference Thursday at 11:30 a.m. to further discuss whether investigators are charging anyone in connection with the musician’s death.

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