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Genesis Prize winner Portman pulls out of Israel ceremony

The foundation behind the prestigious Genesis Prize says this year's winner, Natalie Portman, has pulled out of the June awards ceremony in Israel, quoting a representative for the U.S. actress as saying recent events in Israel were "extremely distressing to her."

The Genesis Prize Foundation says it was informed Portman "does not feel comfortable participating in any public events in Israel."

The statement late Thursday did not refer to specific events. Israel has faced criticism for its response to mass protests on the Gaza-Israel border, in which 28 Palestinians were killed and hundreds wounded by Israeli fire since March 30. Israel says it's defending its border.

The foundation says it fears Portman's decision will "cause our philanthropic initiative to be politicized."

The prize recognizes Jewish achievement and contributions to humanity.

Judge to hear arguments about delaying Stormy Daniels case

President Donald Trump's lawyer is asking a federal judge in Los Angeles to delay a court case brought by a porn actress who claims she had an affair with the president.

U.S. District Judge James Otero is set to hear arguments Friday morning about whether to delay Stormy Daniels' case after FBI agents raided the office and residence of Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, seeking records about a nondisclosure agreement Daniels signed days before the 2016 presidential election.

Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, has been seeking to invalidate the agreement and has offered to return the $130,000 she was paid in order to publicly discuss the relationship and "set the record straight." She argues the agreement is legally invalid because it was only signed by Daniels and Cohen, but was not signed by Trump.

Cohen, who has denied there was ever an affair, said he paid the $130,000 out of his pocket using a home equity loan. He has said neither the Trump Organization nor the Trump campaign was a party to the transaction with Daniels and he was not reimbursed for the payment.

Trump answered questions about Daniels for the first time earlier this month and said he had no knowledge of the payment made by Cohen and didn't know where Cohen had gotten the money. The White House has repeatedly said Trump denies the affair.

Cohen's attorneys have accused Daniels of violating the agreement's confidentiality clauses more than 20 times and said she could be liable for $1 million in damages for each violation.

The case took on new significance last week when FBI agents raided Cohen's office, hotel and residence.

The agents were seeking any information on payments made to Daniels and a former Playboy model, Karen McDougal, according to people familiar with the investigation but not authorized to discuss it publicly. The search warrants also sought bank records, records on Cohen's dealings in the taxi industry and his communications with the Trump campaign, the people said.

After the raids, Cohen asked a judge in Los Angeles to grant a stay for at least 90 days and argued that because the allegations in the lawsuit overlap with the criminal investigation, Cohen's civil rights "may be adversely affected if this case proceeds."

Daniels' attorney, Michael Avenatti, has objected to the delay and pressed for the case to continue immediately.

In a tweet on Thursday, Avenatti said he would "vehemently argue against the attempt by Mr. Cohen and Mr. Trump to delay this case."

"The American people deserve the truth as quickly as possible," he said.

As Prince's health waned, alarm grew in inner circle

Some of Prince's closest confidants had grown increasingly alarmed about his health in the days before he died and tried to get him help as they realized he had an opioid addiction — yet none were able to give investigators the insight they needed to determine where the musician got the fentanyl that killed him, according to investigative documents released Thursday.

Just ahead of this weekend's two-year anniversary of Prince's death, prosecutors announced they would file no criminal charges in the case and the state investigation was closed.

"My focus was lasered in on trying to find out who provided that fentanyl, and we just don't know where he got it," said Carver County Attorney Mark Metz. "We may never know. ... It's pretty clear from the evidence that he did not know, and the people around him didn't know, that he was taking fentanyl."

Metz said Prince had suffered from pain for years and likely believed he was taking a common painkiller.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park studio compound on April 21, 2016. His death sparked a national outpouring of grief and prompted a joint investigation by Carver County and federal authorities.

An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin.

The investigative materials — including documents , photos and videos — were posted online Thursday afternoon. Several images show the music superstar's body on the floor of his Paisley Park estate, near an elevator. He is on his back, his head on the floor, eyes closed. His right hand is on his stomach and left arm on the floor.

The documents include interviews with Prince's inner circle. That included longtime friend and bodyguard Kirk Johnson, who told investigators that he had noticed Prince "looking just a little frail," but said he did not realize he had an opioid addiction until he passed out on a plane a week before he died.

"It started to all making sense though, just his behavior sometimes and change of mood and I'm like oh this is what, I think this is what's going on, that's why I took the initiative and said let's go to my doctor because you haven't been to the doctor, let's check it all out," Johnson said, according to a transcript of an interview with investigators.

Johnson said after that episode, Prince canceled some concerts as friends urged him to rest. Johnson also said that Prince "said he wanted to talk to somebody" about his addiction.

Johnson asked his own doctor, Michael Todd Schulenberg, to see Prince on April 7, 2016. Schulenberg told authorities he gave Prince an IV; authorities said he also prescribed Vitamin D and a nausea medication — under Johnson's name. Johnson then called Schulenberg on April 14, asking the doctor to prescribe a pain medication for Prince's hip. Schulenberg did so, again under Johnson's name, Metz said.

On the night of April 14 to April 15, Prince passed out on a flight home from Atlanta, and the private plane made an emergency stop in Moline, Illinois. The musician had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses effects of an opioid overdose.

A paramedic told a police detective that after the second shot of naloxone, Prince "took a large gasp and woke up," according to the investigative documents. He said Prince told paramedics, "I feel all fuzzy."

A nurse at the hospital where Prince was taken for monitoring told detectives that he refused routine overdose testing that would have included blood and urine tests. When asked what he had taken, he didn't say what it was, but that "someone gave it to him to relax." Other documents say Prince said he took one or two pills.

The documents show that Johnson contacted Schulenberg again on April 18, and expressed concern that Prince was struggling with opioids. At that time, Schulenberg told investigators, Johnson apologized for asking the doctor to prescribe the previous painkiller.

An assistant to Prince told investigators that he had been unusually quiet and sick with the flu in the days before he was found dead. Meron Bekure said she last saw Prince a day earlier, when she was going to take him to the doctor for a checkup but that Prince told her he would go with Johnson instead.

On that day, Schulenberg saw Prince and ran some tests and prescribed other medications to help him. A urinalysis came back positive for opioids. That same day, Paisley Park staffers contacted California addiction specialist Dr. Howard Kornfeld. The doctor sent his son, Andrew, to Minnesota that night, and the younger Kornfeld was among those who found Prince's body. Andrew Kornfeld was carrying buprenorphine, a medication that can be used to help treat opioid addiction.

Andrew Kornfeld told investigators that Prince was still warm to the touch when he was found, but that rigor mortis had begun to set in.

The documents also show that Prince's closest confidants knew he was a private person and tried to respect that, with Johnson saying: "That's what pisses me off cause it's like man, how did he hide this so well?"

Metz said some of Prince's friends might have enabled him as they tried to protect him.

"There is no doubt that the actions of individuals will be criticized, questioned and judged in the days and weeks to come," Metz said. "But suspicions and innuendo are categorically insufficient to support any criminal charges."

The U.S. attorney's office also said Thursday it had no credible evidence that would lead to federal criminal charges. A law enforcement official close to the investigation told The Associated Press that the federal investigation is now inactive unless new information emerges. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the federal case remains open.

But federal authorities announced that Schulenberg had agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a civil violation from the allegation that he illegally prescribed the opioid oxycodone for Prince in Johnson's name. Schulenberg admitted to no facts or liability in the settlement, which includes stricter monitoring of his prescribing practices, and authorities said he is not the target of a criminal investigation.

Oxycodone, the generic name for the active ingredient in OxyContin, was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. But it is part of a family of painkillers driving the nation's addiction and overdose epidemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 2 million Americans abused or were addicted to prescription opioids, including oxycodone, in 2014.

A confidential toxicology report obtained by the AP in March showed high concentrations of fentanyl in the singer's blood, liver and stomach. The concentration of fentanyl in Prince's blood alone was 67.8 micrograms per liter, which outside experts called "exceedingly high."

Prince did not have a prescription for fentanyl.

Metz said several pills were found at the Paisley Park complex after Prince died, and some were later determined to be counterfeit.

The underground market for counterfeit prescription pain pills is brisk and can be highly anonymous, said Carol Falkowski, CEO of Drug Abuse Dialogues, a Minnesota-based drug abuse training and consulting organization. Buyers often don't know who they're dealing with or what's in the drugs they purchase, she said.

The likelihood of people buying pain pills on the street or online that turn out to be counterfeits laced with fentanyl is "extremely high," said Traci Green, a Boston University Medical Center epidemiologist who focuses on the opioid epidemic.

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Associated Press writers Steve Karnowski and Doug Glass in Minneapolis, Ryan J. Foley in Des Moines, Iowa, and Tammy Webber in Chicago contributed this report.

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com . More of her work is at: https://apnews.com/search/amy%20forliti .

Pacino, De Palma remember 'Scarface' at Tribeca reunion

Old "Scarface" friends said hello again at a 35th anniversary screening Thursday that reunited stars Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer and Steven Bauer and filmmaker Brian De Palma for an evening full of reflection on how the ferocious and garish gangster epic — like Tony Montana's rise from dishwasher to drug lord — has grown in stature.

The reunion, held at New York's Beacon Theatre, was one of the main events of the just kicked-off Tribeca Film Festival. The festival has made such anniversaries a regular feature in recent years, many of them celebrating classics of Tribeca co-founder Robert De Niro. But the "Scarface" event was for a movie De Niro reportedly turned down, and which now lives on as one of Pacino's maximum performances.

De Palma, the celebrated 77-year-old filmmaker of "Carlito's Way" and "The Untouchables," suggested the arc of Montana in "Scarface" was reminiscent of President Donald Trump's.

"I've always been interested about making movies about people who start rather humbly and then acquire a great deal of power and then ultimately isolate themselves and live in their own world. Could that be anything we're experiencing now?" said De Palma with a laugh.

The reunion wasn't without its hitches. When the post-screening panel moderator Jesse Kornbluth — as seemingly an opening to discuss Pfeiffer's character's gaunt, cocaine-snorting habits — asked the actress how much she weighed when making the film, boos echoed around the theater. But the affection the crowd had for "Scarface" was palpable throughout the evening, with applause bursting out frequently during the nearly three-hour film for favorite scenes and cherished lines.

De Palma's 1983 film, penned by Oliver Stone, was a remake of the Howard Hawks-directed 1932 gangster film of the same name. (De Palma even dedicated the film to Hawks and screenwriter Ben Hecht.) The project began with Pacino being enthralled by the original.

"I was completely taken with Paul Muni's performance," said Pacino. "After I saw that, I thought: I want to be Paul Muni. I want to act like that."

The idea to update the immigrant story to Cuban refugees in Miami came from filmmaker Sidney Lumet, who was briefly attached to direct. The Mariel boatlift in 1980 brought some 125,000 refugees to Florida from Fidel Castro's Cuba. (An updated, Los Angeles-set remake to "Scarface" has been rumored, with "Training Day" filmmaker Antoine Fuqua recently attached to direct a script by David Ayer, Jonathan Herman and Joel and Ethan Coen.)

De Palma's film was a box office hit, the 16th highest grossing film of the year. But it received mixed reviews. Though some, including Roger Ebert, raved about it, critics like David Ansen of Newsweek called it "grand, shallow, decadent entertainment." Yet for many, its reputation has grown over the years, especially on dorm-room walls and in hip-hop, where "Scarface" became a revered influence.

"It's caught on in such a way, and we have experienced it," said Pacino. "This wasn't the way it started. When 'Scarface' first came out, it was extremely controversial."

The hyper-violent film initially received an "X'' rating from the Motion Picture Association of America's ratings board. De Palma said he went through three edits on the film without receiving an "R'' rating before he and producer Martin Bregman decided to withdraw any changes.

"Marty said, 'We'll go to war with these people,'" said De Palma, still relishing the battle. "And that's what we did."

Some also took issue with how the film depicted Cuban immigrants as vicious drug-dealers at a time when many were trying to get a foothold in the United States.

"A lot of the old-school Cubans were concerned with me almost to the point that they weren't really sure that my participation in a Hollywood movie was worth me downgrading or degrading or tainting the image of their accomplishments in the new society," said the Cuban-born Bauer. "What I tried to convey to them was: Relax, man. It's a movie."

Pfieffer, too, said she's been asked over the years about playing a female character with so little agency in "Scarface."

"I felt that by allowing people to observe who this character is and the sacrifices that she's made said more (than) getting up on any soap box and preaching to people," said Pfeiffer.

The actress added that her experience acting alongside Pacino was life-changing.

"One of the things that hit me the strongest was watching him fiercely protect character, really at all costs and without any sort of apology," said Pfeiffer. "I have always tried to emulate that. I try to be polite about it. I think that's what really makes great acting."

Pacino also shared one of his most vivid memories. While filming the final shootout, he burned his hand badly enough to shut shooting down for two weeks. "I grabbed the barrel of the gun I just fired. My hand stuck to it. It just stuck to it," said Pacino. Pacino promptly left the set to be bandaged at a hospital.

"This nurse comes up to me later and she says, 'You're Al Pacino.' I said 'Yeah.' And she said, 'I thought you were some scumbag,'" Pacino recalled chuckling. "There's something there."

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Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Mom who lost pink house, court case hopes for box office win

Susette Kelo's Supreme Court case now has a Hollywood ending, just not the one she hoped for.

What Kelo wanted when she took her case to the high court more than a decade ago was to get to stay in her little pink house in New London, Connecticut. The city was trying to force her out to make way for development, and Kelo didn't want to go. The high court ruled against her.

Now, however, Kelo's story has been turned into a movie, "Little Pink House," opening Friday in limited nationwide release. It's a movie she and those involved in the film hope will get people to think about the government's power to take private property for public use. Governments can use that power, called eminent domain, as long as they fairly compensate owners.

Kelo, who was in Washington this week to speak about the film, said what city and state officials did "ripped our hearts out."

Kelo wasn't looking for a fight when she bought her house overlooking the Thames River in 1997 and had it painted Odessa Rose pink. Divorced and with five grown sons, she was looking for a place of her own. She found it in the 100-year-old cottage. Shortly after she moved in, pharmaceutical manufacturer Pfizer announced it would move in nearby, building a research facility that opened in 2001.

New London hoped Pfizer's move could help revitalize the city and, with the help of a private nonprofit development corporation, sought to redevelop land near the facility. A hotel, housing, office space, restaurants and shopping were planned. To get it done, the city authorized the use of eminent domain.

Kelo thought that was wrong, and she and a small group of other homeowners took on the city. They acknowledged eminent domain could be used to take their homes for public uses such as a road or military base, but they argued the planned development didn't count.

"She was just fearless," said Oscar-nominated actress Catherine Keener, who plays Kelo in the movie. "She took on everybody."

Kelo had help. The Virginia-based Institute for Justice represented her and the other homeowners. The group was also instrumental in the new movie's making, bringing a book about the case to the attention of filmmakers Courtney Moorehead Balaker and Ted Balaker.

Courtney Balaker, the movie's writer and director, said she was "blown away" by Kelo's case but also by Kelo herself. She compared her story to that of Erin Brockovich, a non-lawyer and divorced mother of three who took on utility company PG&E over contaminated groundwater in Hinkley, California, inspiring a 2000 movie. One big difference: Brockovich won.

In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled against Kelo 5-4. Three justices who sided with the city — Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer and Anthony Kennedy — are still on the court. The two others — John Paul Stevens and David Souter — have since retired. The justices wrote that the city had carefully crafted a development plan it believed would benefit the community. They agreed the use of eminent domain was permitted.

"I want people to walk away thinking about if that's right," Balaker said.

Stevens, the Supreme Court justice who authored the opinion, has acknowledged it was the most unpopular one he wrote. Justice Antonin Scalia, who dissented from the decision, ranked it among the court's biggest mistakes.

After the decision, more than 20 states significantly revised their laws to make it more difficult to take property through eminent domain, said Dana Berliner, litigation director for the Institute for Justice.

Those changes didn't help Kelo, who had to move. And despite the lengthy legal battle, her land still stands empty. Pfizer announced in 2009 that it would leave New London. But submarine builder General Dynamics Electric Boat now occupies its former facility with many more employees, said New London Mayor Michael Passero.

Passero said that's now helping spur development. Passero, a Democrat who grew up in the city, said while the movie vilifies the development corporation, he believes the people behind it had good motives, though they also made mistakes. More than anything, he said, the story is a cautionary tale about two sides becoming so polarized they couldn't find a middle ground.

Kelo's little pink house was ultimately saved. Disassembled and moved but still painted pink, it stands on New London's Franklin Street. Although Kelo doesn't live there, she says she thinks about her former home and her legal fight often.

"A lot of people ask: 'How are you all doin'? ... How are your neighbors? How did you survive this?'" she said of recent appearances in connection with the movie. She answers that they've left the city, bought new homes and are trying to do "the best we can to recover."

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Follow Jessica Gresko on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jessicagresko

Cosby lawyers want jurors to hear from accuser's confidante

Bill Cosby's lawyers are scrambling to make sure jurors at his sexual assault retrial hear from accuser Andrea Constand's confidante before deliberations get underway next week — but they're having trouble getting the woman to cooperate.

Sheri Williams isn't responding to subpoena attempts, Cosby's lawyers said. Now they're seeking a judge's permission to read parts of her deposition into the record just as prosecutors did with Cosby's old testimony.

Judge Steven O'Neill is expected to rule on the request on Friday.

Constand testified at Cosby's first trial last year that she and Williams were good friends and would speak "at all hours of the day: morning, noon, and night" and were in touch as she went to police in January 2005 with allegations he drugged and molested her about a year earlier.

Cosby's lawyers said they expected Williams' testimony to refute Constand's claims that she was unaware he was romantically interested in her. They said she'd show that Constand "could not have been the unwitting victim" prosecutors have portrayed.

Williams' deposition was part of Constand's 2005 lawsuit against Cosby, who wound up settling for nearly $3.4 million.

Two weeks in, Cosby's case is rapidly winding down.

O'Neill is telling jurors that there are only a few more days of testimony. Cosby lawyer Tom Mesereau went into the case predicting it would last about a month.

A pair of drug experts — one for the prosecution and one for the defense — spent Thursday debating one of the case's enduring mysteries: What drug did he give his chief accuser on the night she says he molested her?

Cosby has insisted he handed 1½ tablets of the over-the-counter cold and allergy medicine Benadryl to Andrea Constand to help her relax before their sexual encounter at his mansion outside Philadelphia. Constand testified he gave her three small blue pills that left her incapacitated and unable to resist as he molested her.

The experts agreed that paralysis isn't known to be a side effect of Benadryl, though its active ingredient can cause drowsiness and muscle weakness, among other side effects.

Cosby's expert, Harry Milman, said he didn't know of any small blue pill that could produce the symptoms Constand described.

The "Cosby Show" star has previously acknowledged under oath he gave Quaaludes — a powerful sedative and 1970s-era party drug that's been banned in the U.S. for more than 35 years — to women he wanted to have sex with, but denied having them by the time he met Constand in the early 2000s.

Dr. Timothy Rohrig, a forensic toxicologist called by prosecutors, testified Thursday that quaaludes can make people sleepy. But he and Milman said the drug came in large white pills — not small and blue.

Prosecutors rested their case after Rohrig got off the witness stand.

The defense immediately asked Judge Steven O'Neill to acquit Cosby and send jurors home, arguing prosecutors hadn't proved aggravated indecent assault charges. O'Neill refused.

Cosby's lawyers are expected to call several people who worked for him, including an executive assistant and employees of his talent agency and publicity firm. It's likely part of a bid to challenge the prosecution's contention that the alleged assault happened within the 12-year statute of limitations.

Williams' deposition testimony could have insights into what led Constand to accuse Cosby and whether the encounter was a factor in her leaving her job a few months later as the director of women's basketball operations at Temple University.

A private investigator working for the defense said he attempted to serve Williams at least six times at her North Carolina home before sending her a FedEx package containing a subpoena and instructions to call Cosby's legal team.

Williams' name already has come up several times at the retrial.

Constand testified that Williams was the friend she cut and pasted emails from for a business that Cosby's lawyers described as a Ponzi scheme.

Cosby lawyer Kathleen Bliss questioned Constand's mother about Andrea's friendship with Williams and suggested that they were on the outs about a month before Constand went to police.

"What has Sheri got to do with this?" Gianna Constand replied.

Charles Kipps, a writer who worked with Cosby, testified he met Constand and Williams for dinner in New York as Constand was moving back to Canada in March 2004.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

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Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak.

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For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial.

Bette Midler to return to 'Hello, Dolly' for a summer run

Bette Midler is not quite ready to say goodbye to her Dolly.

The Divine Miss M is returning to the Tony Award-winning revival of "Hello, Dolly!" on July 17 for a six-week run that will close the production on Aug. 25, The Associated Press has learned.

Midler is not coming back empty-handed. She also has lured previous co-stars David Hyde Pierce and Gavin Creel back as well. Pierce earned a Tony nomination in the show and Creel won a best featured Tony.

Tickets for the reunited cast's final shows go on sale on April 28.

The iconic role of Dolly Levi marked Midler's return to the Broadway musical stage in about 50 years and she shattered box office records at the Shubert Theatre. She won the Tony for best actress in a musical.

The Grammy- and Emmy Award-winner plays a matchmaker and schemer in the show, which features the songs "Put On Your Sunday Clothes," ''Before the Parade Passes By" and "So Long Dearie."

Midler stepped into the role last spring and ended her run in mid-January. She was replaced by Bernadette Peters, who will now leave after the July 15 show.

The first national tour of "Hello, Dolly!" kicks off in October at Playhouse Square in Cleveland, Ohio, starring Tony Award-winner Betty Buckley.

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Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

California man charged with hate crimes over threats to Jews

A Southern California man pleaded not guilty Thursday to hate crimes after prosecutors say he threatened prominent members of the Jewish community and had with a "kill list" that included the names of people in the entertainment industry.

Nicholas Rose of Irvine pleaded not guilty to making criminal threats and violating civil rights, with sentencing enhancements for hate crimes.

It's unclear whether the 26-year-old has an attorney. He has a court appearance set for April 27.

A family member called the Orange Police Department on Monday and reported that Rose said he wanted to kill people and specifically threatened the Jewish community, according to the Orange County District Attorney's Office.

Police arrested Rose at his home Tuesday after saying they found "kill lists" of prominent Jewish community members, steps titled "killing my first Jew," as well as references to churches and a synagogue in the area.

He also had .22-caliber ammunition, prosecutors said.

Prosecutor Jeff Moore told the Orange County Register that the kill lists included some well-known names in the entertainment industry and that everyone named has been alerted.

He said investigators were reviewing Rose's writings, which he described as rambling.

"From his writings it's hard tell exactly what direction he's going in or who he was angry with," Moore said. "He was apparently displeased with some churches that he thought were sympathetic to the Jewish cause."

Bono gets new George W. Bush Medal for leadership

Rock star Bono, frontman for the band U2, has been presented with the first of what the George W. Bush Presidential Center intends to be an annual medal for individuals who change the world in some way.

Former President George W. Bush presented the George W. Bush Medal for Distinguished Leadership to Bono on Thursday at the center. It was in recognition of Bono's humanitarian work against poverty and preventable diseases such as HIV/AIDS.

In a video stream , Bono praised Bush, Congress and American taxpayers for progress made against AIDS in vulnerable populations. But he said the fight faces an uncertain future. He said there are problems with the Trump administration "talking about turning back."

Bono said Americans must be "very hard-headed" about arguing for saving lives.

Hundreds celebrate former first lady Barbara Bush in Houston

The memorials to former first lady Barbara Bush have begun with a celebration of her life in front of Houston's City Hall.

Mayor Sylvester Turner and several of Houston's leading clergy members from different faiths offered tributes to Bush. She died at her Houston home Tuesday at age 92.

Hundreds attended the City Hall event on Thursday. The Houston Children's Chorus, a choir of 60 children that sang dozens of times for Bush and her husband, former President George H.W. Bush, performed.

Meanwhile at the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, rock star Bono praised Barbara Bush for her public service impulse. He said he believed that moved her son, former President George W. Bush, to create the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

Bono was at the center to accept a medal for distinguished leadership.

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