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Julia Louis-Dreyfus to receive 2018 Mark Twain Prize for American Humor

Julia Louis-Dreyfus has been named this year’s recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

Variety reported that the 57-year-old actress will receive the prize at at the Kennedy Center on Oct. 21.

>> Read more trending news 

“Like Mark Twain, Julia has enriched American culture with her iconic, unforgettable, and outright hilarious brand of humor,” Deborah F. Rutter, the president of the Kennedy Center, said in a statement, according to The New York Times. “Over four decades, her wildly original characters and her gift for physical comedy have left us in stitches.”

“Well, this is insanely exciting,” Louis-Dreyfus tweeted Wednesday in response to the news.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Louis-Dreyfus will be the sixth woman and 21st recipient overall of the prize. She joins the likes of Richard Pryor, Whoopi Goldberg, Lily Tomlin, Lorne Michaels, Steve Martin, Billy Crystal, George Carlin, Tina Fey, Will Ferrell, Ellen DeGeneres, Carol Burnett, Jay Leno, Eddie Murphy and Bill Murray as those who have received the prize. Bill Cosby’s 2009 prize was rescinded by the Kennedy Center earlier this year after his sexual assault conviction.

“Merely to join the list of distinguished recipients of this award would be honor enough, but, as a student of both American history and literature, the fact that Mr. Twain himself will be presenting the award to me in person is particularly gratifying,” Louis-Dreyfus said in a statement.

The Oct. 21 ceremony will be in Washington, D.C.

Clint Eastwood’s daughter Francesca Eastwood expecting first child

Francesca Eastwood, the daughter of Clint Eastwood and Frances Fisher, is pregnant with her first child.

Us Weekly reported that Eastwood, 24, made the announcement Tuesday while at the 2018 Environmental Media Association Awards in Los Angeles. Wearing a black off-the-shoulder dress, Eastwood posed with her mother on the green carpet before the event. She even posed to the side to display her baby bump.

>> Read more trending news 

Inside the event, as Eastwood and Fisher presented on stage, Fisher, 66, rubbed her daughter’s belly, saying, “I’m so excited. I’m gonna be a grandma!” People reported that Eastwood told the star-studded crowd she was pregnant. 

Glimpses of Eastwood’s baby bump were on display at Disneyland during a family trip. Eastwood’s younger sister, Morgan Eastwood, shared glimpses of Francesca Eastwood’s bump.

Francesca Eastwood has not commented on the father of the child. She was married to Jonah Hill’s brother, Jordan Feldstein, in 2013. The marriage was annulled a week later. Feldstein died in 2017 because of a blood clot that originated in his leg, according to the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office.

Local gamer bar Cardboard Crowns to shut down after 7 months

Gamer bar and cafe Cardboard Crowns, which opened last October near the Dayton Mall, will shut its doors after the close of business this Sunday, May 27.

>> NEW TODAY: Retail store closes at the Dayton Mall after more than a decade

“This coming weekend will be our last weekend of operations. We are inviting everyone out for one last weekend of gaming,” founder Ben T. Adams said. “We will be running all of our beer/wine bottles and drafts for $2 (Thursday through Sunday) as a way to thank the community for their ongoing support.” 

>> Both Dayton-area Zoup! restaurants shut down abruptly

Adams said he is seeking a buyer for the business “or an interested party looking for a turn-key space to open a Bar/cafe-type business in our location with a liquor license that would convey with the space.” The 3,500-square-foot bar/cafe is located at 147 N. Springboro Pike (Ohio 741) in the Corners at the Mall retail center in Miamisburg.

>> ‘Goodbye sale’ set for iconic roller rink that opened more than 60 years ago

The lack of foot traffic and revenue for Cardboard Crowns’ business model led to the decision to close, Adams said.

>> PHOTOS: Did we spot you sipping wine at Carillon Park’s Fleurs De Fete?

“Since I am not working the cafe directly, too much money is going to labor expenses,” he said. “The revenue is close to enough to cover rent/other fixed expenses, but realistically we would need either a pair or group of entrepreneurs willing to work without taking compensation until the business was built up to the point that it was self-sustaining.”

>> RELATED: The stunning transformation of Dayton’s newest arcade bar, DK Effect

“Additionally, with myself working two jobs usually in excess of 80 hours a week, there's just not enough time left over for me to devote enough to the business in a meaningful way to carry out all of the functions needed to ensure its success.”

>> Kettering business asked to leave shopping center after 25 years

“We are very grateful to the Dayton board-game community for all of their support, and we look forward to continuing to do what we can to support the Dayton area's board gaming community.”

>> RELATED: Kettering bar has 300 board games, craft beers — and no TVs

Adams had expanded the food menu and made a few other changes in response to customer feedback two months ago in an attempt to boost business.

>> Esther Price Candies expands to satisfy customer demand

The café’s concept is part of a national and local trend to combine gaming and drinks. Cardboard Crowns’ board-game selections ranges from lighter games to more involved, strategic games.

>> 7 bar and gaming arcades to visit in Dayton

California's West Hollywood declares 'Stormy Daniels Day'

Stormy Daniels: Freedom fighter or city icon?

The porn actress who is suing President Donald Trump was praised Wednesday as a heroine in West Hollywood, California.

About 100 people cheered and chanted "Stormy! Stormy!" as Daniels appeared outside an adult entertainment store called Chi Chi LaRue's.

Mayor John Duran officially declared it "Stormy Daniels Day" and presented her with the key to the city.

"This community has a history of standing up to bullies and speaking truth to power, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it," Daniels said.

Duran called Daniels a modern-day Lady Godiva who "has had to bear the slings and arrows of attacks not only from people all over this country, but from the most powerful person on the planet."

Daniels and her attorney are "fighting back for all of us to get our country back into our hands," said Duran.

Outside the store, a mannequin was adorned with a T-shirt with pink letters reading #TeamStormy. A banner with the city's logo said "#resist."

A liberal city of 35,000 with a huge LGBT population, West Hollywood has declared itself a sanctuary city and a "safe space" for people of all nationalities and immigration status.

Its City Council has vehemently opposed what it considers to be Trump administration bigotry and discrimination. Last year, the City Council approved a resolution calling on the U.S. House of Representatives to impeach Trump.

Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, has starred in dozens of adult films, including one called "Sexbots: Programmed for Pleasure" and a Sleeping Beauty parody where she played Maleficent. She also has been appearing at strip clubs across the country since gaining notoriety for her ties to the president.

Daniels alleges that she had an affair with Trump in 2006 and has sued to invalidate the confidentiality agreement she signed days before the 2016 presidential election. She contends the agreement is invalid because Trump never signed it.

She's also suing Trump and his personal attorney, Michael Cohen, alleging defamation.

While Trump has denied the affair, Cohen has acknowledged paying Daniels $130,000 as part of the non-disclosure agreement.

Philip Roth: a generation's defining voice

In the self-imposed retirement of his final years, Philip Roth remained curious and removed from the world he had shocked and had shocked him in return.

He praised younger authors such as Ta-Nehisi Coates and Teju Cole, and confided that he had read "Born to Run," the memoir by another New Jersey giant, Bruce Springsteen. He followed with horror the rise of Donald Trump and found himself reliving the imagined horrors of his novel "The Plot Against America," in which the country succumbs to the fascist reign of President Charles Lindbergh.

But Roth, who died Tuesday at age 85, was also a voice — a defining one — of a generation nearing its end. He was among the last major writers raised without television, who ignored social media and believed in engaging readers through his work alone and not the alleged charms or virtues of his private self. He was safely outside Holden Caulfield's fantasy that a favorite author could be "a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it." He didn't celebrate romantic love or military heroism or even consider the chance for heavenly justice.

The meaning of life, he once said, paraphrasing his idol Franz Kafka, is that it stops.

"Life's most disturbing intensity is death," he wrote in his novel "Everyman," published in 2006.

Best known for works ranging from the wild and ribald "Portnoy's Complaint" to the elegiac "American Pastoral," Roth was among the greatest writers never to win the Nobel Prize. And he died, with dark and comic timing, in the year that the prize committee called off the award as it contended with a #MeToo scandal. He also died just minutes after the book world had concluded the annual Pen America gala in Manhattan and on the eve of another literary tradition — Wednesday's annual induction ceremony at the American Academy of Arts and Letters, which voted Roth in more than 40 years ago.

"No other writer has meant as much to me," Jeffrey Eugenides, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and a new academy inductee, wrote in an email Wednesday to The Associated Press. "No other American writer's work have I read so obsessively, year after year."

Roth's novels were often narratives of lust, mortality, fate and Jewish assimilation. He identified himself as an American writer, not a Jewish one, but for Roth, the American experience and the Jewish experience were often the same. While predecessors such as Saul Bellow and Bernard Malamud wrote of the Jews' painful adjustment from immigrant life, Roth's characters represented the next generation. Their first language was English, and they spoke without accents. They observed no rituals and belonged to no synagogues. The American dream, or nightmare, was to become "a Jew without Jews, without Judaism, without Zionism, without Jewishness." The reality, more often, was to be regarded as a Jew among gentiles and a gentile among Jews.

He was a fierce satirist and uncompromising realist, committed to the narration of "life, in all its shameless impurity." Feminists, Jews and one ex-wife attacked him in print, and sometimes in person. Women in his books were at times little more than objects of desire and rage and The Village Voice once put his picture on its cover, condemning him as a misogynist. A panel moderator berated him for his comic portrayals of Jews, asking Roth if he would have written the same books in Nazi Germany. Jewish scholar Gershom Scholem called "Portnoy's Complaint" the "book for which all anti-Semites have been praying." When Roth won the Man Booker International Prize in 2011, a judge resigned, alleging the author suffered from terminal solipsism and went "on and on and on about the same subject in almost every single book." In "Sabbath's Theater," Roth imagines the inscription for his title character's headstone: "Sodomist, Abuser of Women, Destroyer of Morals."

Roth's wars also originated from within. He survived a burst appendix in the late 1960s and near-suicidal depression in 1987. For all the humor in his work — and, friends would say, in his private life — jacket photos usually highlighted the author's tense, dark-eyed glare. In 2012, he announced that he had stopped writing fiction and would instead dedicate himself to helping biographer Blake Bailey complete his life story, one he openly wished would not come out while he was alive. By 2015, he had retired from public life altogether.

Roth began his career in rebellion against the conformity of the 1950s and ended it in defense of the security of the 1940s; he was never warmer than when writing about his childhood, or more sorrowful, and enraged, than when narrating the betrayal of innocence lost.

Acclaim and controversy were inseparable. His debut collection, published in 1959, was "Goodbye, Columbus," featuring a love (and lust) title story about a working-class Jew and his wealthier girlfriend. It brought the writer a National Book Award and some extra-literary criticism. The aunt of the main character, Neil Klugman, is a meddling worrywart, and the upper-middle-class relatives of Neil's girlfriend are satirized as shallow materialists. Roth believed he was simply writing about people he knew, but some Jews saw him as a traitor, subjecting his brethren to ridicule before the gentile world. A rabbi accused him of distorting the lives of Orthodox Jews. At a writers conference in the early 1960s, he was relentlessly accused of creating stories that affirmed the worst Nazi stereotypes.

But Roth insisted writing should express, not sanitize. After two relatively tame novels, "Letting Go" and "When She was Good," he abandoned his good manners with "Portnoy's Complaint," his ode to blasphemy against the "unholy trinity of "father, mother and Jewish son." Published in 1969, a great year for rebellion, it was an event, a birth, a summation, Roth's triumph over "the awesome graduate school authority of Henry James," as if history's lid had blown open and out erupted a generation of Jewish guilt and desire.

As narrated by Alexander Portnoy, from a psychiatrist's couch, Roth's novel satirized the dull expectations heaped upon "nice Jewish boys" and immortalized the most ribald manifestations of sexual obsession. His manic tour of one man's onanistic adventures led Jacqueline Susann to comment that "Philip Roth is a good writer, but I wouldn't want to shake hands with him." Although "Portnoy's Complaint" was banned in Australia and attacked by Scholem and others, many critics welcomed the novel as a declaration of creative freedom. "Portnoy's Complaint" sold millions, making Roth wealthy, and, more important, famous. The writer, an observer by nature, was now observed. He was an item in gossip columns, a name debated at parties. Strangers called out to him in the streets. Roth would remember hailing a taxi and, seeing that the driver's last name was Portnoy, commiserating over the book's notoriety.

With Roth finding himself asked whether he really was Portnoy, several of his post-Portnoy novels amounted to a dare: is it fact of fiction? In "The Anatomy Lesson," ''The Counterlife" and other novels, the featured character is a Jewish writer from New Jersey named Nathan Zuckerman. He is a man of similar age to Roth who just happened to have written a "dirty" best seller, "Carnovsky," and is lectured by friends and family for putting their lives into his books.

In the 1990s, he reconnected with the larger world and culture of his native country. "American Pastoral" narrated a decent man's decline from high school sports star to victim of the '60s and the "indigenous American berserk." In "The Human Stain," he raged against the impeachment of President Bill Clinton over his affair with a White House intern. "The fantasy of purity is appalling. It's insane," he wrote. Near the end of his writing life, Roth was increasingly preoccupied with history and its sucker punch, how ordinary people were defeated by events beyond their control, like the Jews in "The Plot Against America" or the college student in "Indignation" who dies in the Korean War.

"The most beautiful word in the English language," Roth wrote, "'In-dig-na-tion!'"

What Had Happened Was podcast: Tom Archdeacon talks Miami vices, wedding rings and LeBron’s mom

He’s told thousands of amazing stories. It should come as no surprise that Tom Archdeacon has a hell of a story of his own.

For the 10th episode of the What Had Happened Was podcast, host Amelia Robinson sat down with Arch, an award-winning  Dayton Daily News sports writer and her mentor for exactly one day. 

Arch told Amelia about his Miami Vice days, how he happened into journalism, his passion for telling untold stories and that time he had a run-in with LeBron’s mom. 

Brace yourself! This episode shines like diamonds.  

WHERE TO LISTEN & SUBSCRIBE 

Get the latest episodes delivered directly to you. Find it on iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher and other services. 

If you like what you hear, rate this podcast. 

ABOUT THE PODCAST

“What Had Happened Was” is a podcast for Dayton, powered by Dayton.com. You won't believe the stories that come from right here. Host Amelia Robinson shares the best tales from the Gem City, Land of Funk and Birthplace of Aviation: Dayton, Ohio. 

This podcast is brought to you by Cox Digital Marketing

EPISODE 9: Cackle vs. Cancer — the world with Alexis Larsen and Kristen Wicker

EPISODE 8 : Dead in Dayton — a mayor trapped in a brothel, a former slave claps back, and a gypsy queen cliffhanger

EPISODE 7: Tusks, Fireball and belly shirts with the magical McKibben Brothers

EPISODE 6: Sweet sticky things with John “Turk” Logan

EPISODE 5:  Watch for 10,000 ‘leprechauns’

EPISODE 4: The Yellow Springs vagina tree’s knobby side

EPISODE 3: All funked up with Ohio Players’ Diamond Williams

EPISODE 2: Bourbon, Beards and Joe Head

EPISODE 1: The Rubi Girls explain

Jury gets closing arguments in Copperfield negligence case

A Nevada jury is due to hear closing arguments in a British tourist's lawsuit blaming Las Vegas Strip headliner David Copperfield for injuries the tourist suffered while taking part in a 2013 vanishing.

Gavin Cox and his wife are suing Copperfield, the MGM Grand hotel and several business entities for negligence and monetary damages. Closing arguments are set for Wednesday.

Cox testified he suffered brain and body injuries in a fall while stagehands urged him and others to run during an illusion that appeared to make up to 13 people disappear onstage and reappear in the theater.

Copperfield testified he never knew of anyone getting hurt during nearly 20 years performing the trick on tour and in Las Vegas.

Cox's lawyers brought in others who testified they were injured.

Chris Stapleton, Kelly Clarkson to perform at CMT Awards

Blake Shelton, Chris Stapleton, Kelly Clarkson, Kelsea Ballerini, Sam Hunt and Luke Bryan will be performing live at the CMT Awards show next month.

The performers were announced Wednesday for the June 6 awards show held in Nashville, Tennessee, and airing on CMT.

Clarkson is making her CMT Awards show debut with a performance of the classic rock song "American Woman." The song will be the theme song for a new TV show of the same name on Paramount Network starring Alicia Silverstone and Mena Suvari.

Stapleton and Shelton are both nominated for video of the year, while Carrie Underwood, Florida Georgia Line and Jason Aldean are tied for the most nominations with four each.

Alleged IS supporter accused of urging Prince George attack

An alleged supporter of the Islamic State group went on trial in London on Wednesday, accused of encouraging attacks on 4-year-old Prince George.

Prosecutors say 32-year-old Husnain Rashid provided an "e-toolkit for terrorism" on an online channel he ran under the name the Lone Mujahid.

Prosecutor Annabel Darlow told a jury that Rashid encouraged attacks on a range of targets, including "injecting poison into supermarket ice creams and targeting Prince George at his first school."

Prosecutors say one post included a photo of the prince, his school's address, a silhouette of a jihadi fighter and the message "even the royal family will not be left alone."

Rashid, a mosque teacher from Nelson in northwest England, is accused of encouraging "lone wolf" attacks and providing advice on using bombs, chemicals and knives.

"He made numerous posts glorifying terrorist atrocities committed successfully against others and encouraging and inciting his readers to plan and commit more successful terror attacks of their own," Darlow said.

Rashid denies preparing terrorist acts, encouraging terrorism and disseminating a terrorist publication.

His trial at London's Woolwich Crown Court is expected to last six weeks.

Comcast v. Disney: a fight for Twenty-First Century Fox

Comcast and Disney are on the verge of a head-to-head bidding war for Fox's entertainment properties.

The potential battle for Twenty-First Century Fox comes as traditional entertainment companies try to amass more properties to compete better with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers' attention — and dollars.

Comcast said Wednesday that it's in the "advanced stages" of making an offer. The company did not provide details, other than to say that its all-cash offer would have a higher value than Disney's current, $52.4 billion all-stock offer. The Wall Street Journal and others reported earlier that Comcast had lined up $60 billion in cash to challenge Disney for media mogul Rupert Murdoch's company.

Larry Downes, project director at the Georgetown Center for Business and Public Policy, said Comcast's interest highlights the fact that content is becoming more important as ways to deliver content proliferate. Cable companies like Comcast are no longer competing only with satellite alternatives such as DirecTV, but also stand-alone services such as Netflix and cable-like online bundles through Sony, AT&T and others.

"Those categories mean less and less all the time — who is a distributor and who is a creator," he said. "Content is king, the most important thing. Distribution can happen over a variety of mechanisms."

Disney already started its own sports streaming service and plans an entertainment-focused one late next year featuring movies and shows from its own studios, which include Marvel, Pixar and "Star Wars" creator Lucasfilm.

With the Fox deal, Disney would get more content for those services — through the studios behind the Avatar movies, "The Simpsons" and "Modern Family," along with National Geographic. Marvel would get back the characters previously licensed to Fox, reuniting X-Men with the Avengers.

"If Comcast won these assets from the arms of Disney, it would be a 'devastating blow' to ... Disney's streaming ambitions going forward," GBH Insights analyst Dan Ives said.

Comcast, meanwhile, has been leading the way in marrying pipes with the entertainment that flows through them. It bought NBCUniversal's cable channels and movie studio in 2013 and added Dreamworks Animation in 2016.

The Philadelphia company has been tinkering with the traditional cable bundle, offering stand-alone subscriptions for some types of video along with smaller bundles of cable channels delivered over the internet. Earlier this month, Comcast said it will add Netflix to some cable bundles.

With Fox, Comcast would expand a portfolio that already includes U.S. television rights to the Olympics and comedy offerings such as "Saturday Night Live."

Combining the distribution of entertainment with its producers has drawn new concerns about monopoly. The Department of Justice has sued to block AT&T's $85 billion deal for Time Warner. The government worries that AT&T, as DirecTV's owner, could charge Comcast and other rival distributors higher prices for Time Warner channels like CNN or HBO. In turn, that could drive up what consumers pay. AT&T and Time Warner argue they're simply trying to stay afloat in the new streaming environment. A court ruling is expected in June.

Whichever company prevails in the bid for Fox would also control Fox's cable and international TV businesses, though the Fox television network and some cable channels including Fox News and Fox Business Network would stay with Murdoch.

That's key for Comcast, which currently doesn't have an international presence. Disney and Comcast have already been at battle in the U.K., where Comcast made a $30.7 billion offer for Sky TV. Fox has a 39 percent stake in that company and has been trying to buy outright, but its bid has been blocked by regulators. Disney already plans to buy Sky TV as part of the deal for Fox, but U.K. regulators have said they don't see any public interest concerns with Comcast's offer.

Disney, which has its headquarters in Burbank, California, did not respond to a request for comment.

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