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17-year-old twin sister shot, killed in road rage incident, police arrest suspect

Metro Atlanta police have made an arrest in the shooting death of a teenage girl in a possible road rage incident Wednesday at a busy intersection in Dacatur.

>> Read more trending news 

Janae Owens, 17, was in a car with her mother at a red light Wednesday evening when police said a man in a black car opened fire, killing Owens and injuring her mother.

Decatur police arrested a man identified as Simmie Rishcard Reed late Friday night after an anonymous tip. Reed has been charged with one count of murder, two counts of aggravated assault with intent to murder and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.

>> Related: Police: Road rage escalates to gunfire, kills 1 teen, injures another in Decatur

Owens’ family recently moved from Shreveport, Louisiana, to metro Atlanta for a better life, WSB-TV reported.

Investigators told the news station the gunfire was aimed at Owens’ mother, who was driving the car.

The woman’s injuries are not considered life-threatening. Owens’ twin sister was sitting in the back seat and was not injured in the shooting, according to WSB.

Police think road rage may have fueled the gunfire, but Sgt. John Bender told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution the motive is still unknown.

Police said although Reed is behind bars, it is still an ongoing investigation.>> Related: 17-year-old twin sister shot, killed in road rage incident, family distraught as police search for killer

Reed is scheduled to make a first court appearance Monday afternoon.

Marriage may lower risk of heart attack, stroke, study suggests

Single, divorced and widowed individuals may have a higher risk of developing heart disease, stroke and associated risks of death compared to married individuals.

>> Read more trending news 

That’s according to new research published this week in the journal Heart, for which scientists trawled research databases to understand how marital status may influence risk of cardiovascular disease.

Their pooled analysis included 34 studies (1963 to 2015), the largest study to date on the subject, and involved more than 2 million people aged between 42-77 from multiple regions of the globe, including from North America, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Scandinavia.

>> Related: Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

Compared to married individuals, those who were never married, or are divorced/widowed, had a 42 percent higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and 16 percent higher risk of developing coronary artery heart disease.

Those who had never been married had a heightened risk of dying from both heart disease (42 percent) and stroke (55 percent).

>> Related: You may be able to better avoid heart attacks with this common snack, study says

Divorce was associated with a 35 percent higher risk of developing heart disease for both men and women.

And widowed individuals were 16 percent more likely than married men or women to have a stroke, likely a result of stress-related theory, which suggests that losing a partner may have a negative impact on the emotional, behavioral and economic well-being of an individual.

>> Related: Got heart disease? You may have a better chance of survival if married

Researchers reported no difference in the risk of death following a stroke between married and unmarried individuals. However, risk of death after a heart attack was significantly higher (42 percent) among those who had never married.

“Social causation theory suggests that individuals benefit from spousal support,” study authors wrote. “For example, living with another person allows earlier recognition and response to warning symptoms, especially if a myocardial infarction becomes instantly disabling.”

>> Related: Women less likely than men to get CPR from bystanders - and more likely to die - study suggests

Studies have shown that unmarried patients had longer delays when seeking help, authors wrote in the report. These individuals are also twice as likely not to take prescribed medications, the strongest predictor of better outcomes.

Furthermore, greater financial resources from homes with dual incomes make quality healthcare more accessible.

The researchers note that there was no information on same sex partnerships or marriage quality in their report. The meta-analysis didn’t explore unmarried individuals living with someone, either.

>> Related: Do heart stents even work? New study finds they fail to ease chest pain

Future work, the authors suggest, should focus on whether being married is a “surrogate marker” of other health conditions or whether marital status should be considered a risk factor alone.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the country every year–that's 1 in every 4 deaths.

>> Related: Common painkillers increase risk of heart attack by one-third, new study finds

More than 350,000 Americans who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease suffer a cardiac arrest each year in areas other than a hospital. And about 90 percent of them die.

Mass. Gov. Charlie Baker’s son accused of sexually assaulting woman on JetBlue flight

The son of Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker is accused of sexually assaulting a woman on a flight Wednesday, but no charges have been filed in the case.

>> Read more trending news   

The incident reportedly happened on a JetBlue flight when Baker’s son, Andrew Baker, known as A.J., was flying from Washington, D.C. to Boston.

Sources told Boston 25 News a female passenger accused A.J. of groping her breast on the flight.

"This is a personal matter for the Baker Family and A.J. will cooperate with any request from authorities," Baker’s office said in a statement.

JetBlue responded to requests for confirmation with a statement.

"On June 20, the crew of flight 1345 were notified of an incident between customers shortly before landing in Boston," the statement read. "The aircraft landed at approximately 11 p.m. local time where it was met by local authorities.”

Massachusetts State Police say charges have not been filed, and they are not investigating since it is not in the department's jurisdiction.

>> Trending: Death of Memphis soldier at Florida training camp is suspicious, family says

A.J. Baker's attorney, Roberto Braceras, released a statement on the allegations.

"A.J. is fully cooperating and looks forward to a resolution of this matter," Braceras said. 

4 children killed in violent police standoff laid to rest in Florida

Funeral services for four Orlando children killed during a 21-hour police standoff  with their mother’s boyfriend were held Saturday. 

>> Read more trending news 

The services, which were open to the public, took place at St. James Catholic Cathedral in Orlando, according to an attorney representing the family.

The funeral marked a difficult day for the family of Dove Lindsey, 1, Aiden Lindsey, 6, Lillia Pluth, 10, and Irayan Pluth, 12.

The day also proved too emotional for the children's mother, Ciara Lopez. 

"I remain stuck in that one night, that one night where everything changed, standing outside that apartment, waiting for different news," she said in a statement. 

Detectives believe Gary Lindsey, 35, shot the children either shortly before or after police officers came to the door of his apartment June 10 in response to a domestic battery call from Lopez. She had escaped the apartment.

Lindsey fired at the responding officers, seriously wounding Officer Kevin Valencia, who remains in a coma. Lindsey was then holed up in the apartment for almost a full day. Officers found him dead in a closet when they entered the apartment the following day.

>>Related: Wife of Orlando officer in coma: ‘My kids need a daddy. This community needs a real hero'

The children were found in their beds, police said. 

Some of the officers who worked during the standoff went to the service. 

"It's heartbreaking to see, obviously a small casket, with an infant inside," said Orlando Police Chief John Mina. 

Lindsey was Lopez’s boyfriend and the mother of all four children. Lindsey was the father of two of the children.

Common herpes viruses may be linked to development of Alzheimer’s disease, study finds

Two common herpes viruses may play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, which is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and projected to affect 14 million people by 2050.

>> Read more trending news 

That’s according to new research published Thursday in the journal Neuron, for which a team of scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, used genetic data from three different brain banks to examine differences between healthy brain tissue and brain tissue from individuals who died with Alzheimer’s.

The medical community still doesn’t know what causes the disease, so the Mount Sinai scientists set out to try and identify new targets for drugs. Instead, they stumbled upon repetitive hints that the brain tissue of Alzheimer’s patients had higher levels of viruses.

>> Related: How to prevent Alzheimer’s: Sleep, drink wine and exercise, researchers suggest

“The title of the talk that I usually give is, 'I Went Looking for Drug Targets and All I Found Were These Lousy Viruses,’” study co-author and geneticist Joel Dudley said in a statement.

While studying brain tissue of 622 people who had signs of the disease and 322 who weren’t affected by it, Dudley and his team found significant evidence suggesting two specific strains of the human herpes virus (HHV-6A and HHV-7), both of which commonly cause skin rashes called roseola in young children, may have seeped into the Alzheimer’s patients’ brains and remained inactive for decades.

>> Related: Have trouble sleeping? Research says that may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s

“I don't think we can answer whether herpes viruses are a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease. But what's clear is that they're perturbing networks and participating in networks that directly accelerate the brain towards the Alzheimer's topology,” Dudley said.

The team found that the herpes virus genes were interacting with specific genes known to increase risk for Alzheimer’s, but the mere presence of the virus isn’t enough to lead to the disease. Instead, Dudley said, something needs to be activating the viruses to cause replication.

>> Related: Why are Alzheimer's disease deaths up significantly in Georgia?

But their findings do align with some other current research, specifically regarding beta-amyloid proteins, proteins known to increase plaque buildup in Alzheimer’s-affected brains. In the new study, the researchers noted that herpes viruses were involved in networks that regulate these amyloid precursor proteins.

The National Institute on Aging, which helped fund the new research, is working to back another study to test the effects of antiviral drugs on people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s with high levels of herpes virus in their brains.

>> Related: This common vegetable may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease, study says

While the study findings open a door for new treatment options, co-senior author Sam Gandy said in a statement, the results don’t exactly change what scientists know about the risk and susceptibility of Alzheimer’s or their ability to treat it. That’s because both HHV-6A and HHV-7 are incredibly common. In North America alone, almost 90 percent of children have one of the viruses in their blood by the time they’re a few years old, according to Gandy.

According to 2017 report from the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the death rate from Alzheimer’s disease has risen by 55 percent in recent decades.

>> Related: U.S. Alzheimer’s deaths up 55 percent, CDC says

Patients, caregivers and publicly funded long-term care facilities bear significant financial and societal costs due to the increasing rates of Alzheimer’s deaths.

Experts recommend more federal funding for caregiver support and education and for research to find a cure.

According to the CDC, it’s estimated the U.S. spent some $259 billion in 2017 on costs related to the care of those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

Teens who laughed, recorded man drowning won’t face criminal charges 

Four teenagers and one adult who recorded a man’s drowning and laughed as it happened will not be criminally charged, the State Attorney’s Office announced Friday. 

>> Read more trending news 

Jamal Dunn, 31, of Cocoa, Florida, died in July 2017.

A passerby found Dunn’s body in a pond at Bracco Pond Park days after he died, investigators said.

In the two-and-a-half-minute video, the teenage boys can be heard yelling, “We’re not going to help you and you never should have gotten in there.”

>> Related: Teens record, taunt drowning man in Cocoa; no charges filed, police say

There is no Florida law that requires a person to provide emergency assistance.

Prosecutors had considered charging the group with failing to notify a medical examiner of a death, but said they could not appropriately apply it in Dunn’s case without new legislation. 

At the time the video was taken, the group ranged in age from 14 to 18.

>> Related: Florida authorities recommend charges against teens who taunted drowning man, police say

After the incident, a Florida state legislator crafted a good Samaritan bill that would have made it a crime not to assist someone in need, but lawmakers rejected it.

“I know that everyone was sickened by the callous disregard for human life exhibited by these young people. We can only hope that this was an isolated and rare circumstance that will never happen again,” State Attorney Phil Archer said. 

“Unfortunately, Florida law does not address this behavior and we are ethically restrained from pursuing criminal charges without a reasonable belief of proving a crime beyond and to the exclusion of every reasonable doubt.”

Toddler dies after 10 hours in hot car while mother allegedly hangs out with friends

A California woman is jailed on charges related to the death of her 18-month-old toddler inside a hot car, according to Mendocino County authorities.

>> Read more trending news 

Deputies were called to Howard Memorial Hospital in Willits, California, Wednesday afternoon after the death of a young boy identified as Chergery Teywoh Lew Mays.

The child had been taken to the hospital by his mother, Alexandra Raven Scott, Detective Sgt. Andrew Porter with the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release on Facebook.

Scott, a resident of Humboldt County, went to visit friends in Willits around 3 a.m. Wednesday, leaving the boy inside the car for hours.

“It is believed the child was left unattended in the back seat of the vehicle with the windows rolled up for about 10 hours,” Porter said.

The temperature was about 80 degrees in Willits when the boy was found around 1 p.m., but officials told KTLA-TV it was more like 130 degrees inside the car. 

Scott is jailed without bail on suspicion of willfully causing or permitting a child to suffer great bodily injury or death.

Actress Brigitte Nielsen delivers 5th child, a daughter, at age 54

Actress Brigitte Nielsen has a new baby, delivering her fifth child, a daughter, on Friday in Los Angeles, according to People magazine.

>> Read more trending news 

Nielsen, 54, announced her pregnancy last month with husband Mattia Dessi. 

“We are overjoyed to welcome our beautiful daughter into our lives,” the couple told People. “It’s been a long road, and so worth it. We’ve never been more in love.”

People reported the couple named the new baby, who weighed in at 5 lbs. 9 oz., Frida.

The star of “Red Sonja” and “Beverly Hills Cop II” has been married four times before and has four sons, the oldest 34.

Senior citizens earn thousands by sharing their homes, says Airbnb

Thousands of senior citizens across the United States are finding a profitable side hustle --- opening up their homes to strangers on Airbnb.

Nearly 78,000 seniors (ages 60 and up) across the U.S. shared their homes on Airbnb in 2017 -- accounting for $700 million in earnings, the company reports.

The typical host earned an extra $7,000 in income a year -- a positive boost for people living on fixed incomes.

>> Read more trending news 

Airbnb is a website that allows people to open up their homes for vacation rentals or short-term leasing. There are over 5 million homes listed on Airbnb in over 81,000 cities.

According to Airbnb’s annual survey, 41 percent of seniors reported that hosting their home has helped them afford to stay in their homes -- places they’ve often lived most of their lives. 

Airbnb states that 45 percent of senior hosts rely on that extra income to make ends meet and spend it on important costs of living. 

Senior hosts are beloved on Airbnb, the company said.

88 percent of trips hosted by seniors last year resulted in 5-star reviews.

Percentage of active listings with senior Airbnb hosts 

New Mexico34%Maine32%Vermont28%Hawaii26%Delaware26%

 

Typical host earnings for seniors by state 

Hawaii$14,000California$11,700Washington, D.C.$10,500Washington$8,700Rhode Island$8,500

Percentage of senior host reviews with 5-stars 

Nebraska93%North Dakota93%Kansas93%South Dakota92%Indiana91%

Teen girl helps blind, deaf man by signing into his hands on Alaska Air flight

A teen girl helped a blind, deaf man communicate on a recent Alaska Airlines flight, according to KIRO.

Dianne McGinness with Alaska Airlines shared the heartwarming story after a passenger on the flight wrote a post this week about the interaction that was shared over 400,000 times.

The passenger, Lynette Scribner, was traveling on the same flight as the teen and man, and was moved to write a post on the touching encounter. 

>> Read more trending news 

Scribner said the man, Tim Cook, was traveling home to Portland after visiting his sister. Cook lives at Portland's Brookdale Senior Living. 

When passengers of the flight realized Cook was blind and deaf, many helped ensure he was comfortable. A man sitting next to Cook gave him the aisle seat and helped with little tasks like opening his coffee creamer and pouring it into his coffee, Scribner shared.

A flight attendant made an announcement asking if a passenger on board knew American Sign Language. Fifteen-year-old Clara Daly, who has studied ASL for the last year, rang her call button.

When Daly learned the man could communicate only if someone signed into his hand, she immediately went to help.

Cook asked Daly questions and she patiently sign-spelled answers into his hand.

Scribner said Daly learned ASL because she has dyslexia, and it was the easiest foreign language for her to learn.

“Clara was amazing,” an Alaska Airlines flight attendant said in the news release. “You could tell Tim was very excited to have someone he could speak to -- and she was such an angel.”

“When (Cook) asked (Daly) if she was pretty, she blushed and laughed as the seat mate, who had learned a few signs, communicated an enthusiastic yes to Tim,” Scribner shared. “I don't know when I've ever seen so many people rally to take care of another human being. All of us in the immediate rows were laughing and smiling and enjoying his obvious delight in having someone to talk to.”

After the flight, McGinness said Cook met a service provider from Brookdale Senior Living at the gate.

Cook said the flight was the best trip he's ever taken.

Daly told her mom she thought the encounter was "meant to be," since her original flight was canceled and she was redirected to Cook's flight.

On Thursday, Scribner added a note on her beloved post: “We are all starving for good news and this was just what we needed.”

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