Now Playing
K99.1FM
Last Song Played
New Country
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
K99.1FM
Last Song Played
New Country

news

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

‘She keeps asking for her babies’: Family devastated by crash that killed youngest siblings

Natalia Anggraeni of Kennesaw, Georgia, knows her two youngest children were killed in a crash. But her own injuries make it difficult to comprehend friends say.

>> Read more trending news

“She’s in and out of consciousness,” Emily Thoreson, a family friend, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “She keeps asking for her babies, but she knows they aren’t here.”

Thoreson knows the Cobb County family because both she and Anggraeni have children with special needs. On Saturday afternoon, Thoreson got a phone call from Anggraeni with devastating news. The family had been in a crash on I-85 in Anderson County, S.C., while heading to a Wofford College summer camp. 

“We dropped everything and we just drove there,” Thoreson said. “All she could tell us was that Nate and Kiki had passed away.”

Investigators say 17-year-old Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 when for unknown reasons she ran off the highway and her SUV overturned at 5:45 a.m. Saturday morning. 

Wolwark’s younger sister and brother died from their injuries after being ejected, police said. Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and Nate Wolwark, 12, were both killed. Wolwark and her mother, Anggraeni, were wearing seat belts but were seriously injured in the crash.

Numerous drivers stopped at the scene of the crash to help the family, including Sarah Eagle, an East Carolina University nursing student. Eagle said she waited with Kiki until paramedics arrived. The teenager later died at the hospital. 

Jessica and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Tuesday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs and her daughter has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week. 

Anggraeni’s oldest child, Nick, 20, was not with the family at the time of the crash. He stayed at the family’s Kennesaw home to help care for his siblings’ pets, including six chicks that Kiki had recently persuaded her mom to buy, Thoreson said. 

“Kiki was a super-friendly animal lover,” Thoreson said. “She was the artist. She would draw anime and they were so in-depth.” 

And Nate, despite his young age, was mature beyond his years and very polite, Thoreson said. His gentle nature helped him communicate with his older brother, who has autism, and others with special needs, Thoreson said. 

“Nate was wonderful. He’s one of the boys from back in the day. ‘Yes ma’am. No ma’am,’” she said. “He was so friendly. He was such a good, giving child.”

Kirana attended Harrison High School, where she recently completed ninth grade, and Nate attended Palmer Middle School, according to the Cobb County School System. He recently finished sixth grade.

Thoreson’s daughter has created a Go Fund Me page to assist the family, who she says does not have medical insurance. Anggraeni, who works as a special needs paraprofessional for the Cobb County School System, will also need a new vehicle for the family. 

“I’m asking everybody they know if anybody can donate a car, so she doesn’t have to worry about it, so she’ll be able to return to work,” Thoreson said. 

The Sweet Hut Bakery and Cafe near Kennesaw, where the Wolwark sisters worked, is planning to donate all of its proceeds this Saturday to the family. The bakery is located at 2795 Chastain Meadow Parkway. 

The crash remains under investigation by the South Carolina Highway Patrol, a spokesman said Tuesday. 

Funeral arrangements for the siblings have not yet been finalized, but a funeral home in Greenville is assisting with the cost, Thoreson said. The family is hopeful Anggraeni will be released from the hospital in time to attend. 

British ex-soldier gets 18 years to life for parachute plot to kill wife, who survived plunge

“Are you trying to bump me off?” Victoria Cilliers joked in a text to her husband after finding a gas leak in their U.K. home one early morning in March 2015.

It turned out, he was.

Emile Cilliers, 38, of Amesbury, Wiltshire, was sentenced Friday to life in prison, with a chance of parole after 18 years, for the nearly successful plot prosecutors said he came up with when the gas leak failed to work -- tampering with his wife’s parachute before a skydiving jump. Wiltshire police officials said Cilliers, a sergeant in the Royal Army Physical Training Corps, was also found guilty of attempted murder and criminal damage with intent to endanger life for tampering with a gas fitting in a kitchen cupboard at the home the couple shared with their two children. 

The children were home with their mother when Victoria Cilliers discovered the leak, the BBC reported. She was going to the kitchen the morning of March 30, 2015, to get milk for one of the children when she smelled gas. 

The seasoned and skilled skydiving instructor suffered a broken pelvis, broken ribs, two broken vertebrae and internal injuries just six days later -- on Easter Sunday -- when both her main parachute and her reserve chute failed at 4,000 feet, the BBC reported. A seasoned and skilled skydiving instructor, she survived when she landed in the soft earth of a recently plowed field near Salisbury.

>> Read more trending news

Justice Nigel Sweeney described Emile Cilliers’ crimes as “wicked offending of extreme gravity” when sentencing him to prison during a hearing in Winchester Crown Court. 

“That your wife recovered at all was miraculous; she undoubtedly suffered severe physical harm and she must have suffered psychological harm in the terror of the fall and since,” Sweeney said, according to The Guardian. “She appears to have recovered from the physical harm but not, having seen her in the witness box at length, from the psychological harm.”

Victoria Cilliers said in interviews after her husband’s conviction that she still has a hard time seeing her husband as a killer, the newspaper reported. Though she intended to visit him in prison to confront him about what happened, she was not planning a divorce, she said.

Army officials said following Emile Cilliers’ sentencing that steps would be taken to have him discharged from service, the newspaper said. 

The BBC reported that testimony at trial indicated that Emile Cilliers was having affairs with two women, including his ex-wife, at the time of the alleged murder attempts. He was also having unprotected sex with prostitutes. 

Investigators testified that they also found that Cilliers was £22,000 in debt and was hoping to use a £120,000 payout from his wife’s life insurance policy to take care of his problem.   

Detective Inspector Paul Franklin, of the Wiltshire police, on Friday described Emile Cilliers as a “cold, callous, selfish man who cares only about money and his sexual conquests.”

“From the outset, Emile Cilliers showed no remorse for what he had done,” Franklin said in a statement. “He lied all the way through two trials, but in the end justice won out with the guilty verdicts and now a long prison sentence.”

Emile and Victoria Cilliers, an Army physiotherapist, had a troubled seven-year marriage during which Victoria Cilliers occasionally doubted her husband’s fidelity, the BBC reported. When she voiced suspicions, he would blame her doubts on her experience with the infidelity of her first husband, the news station said. 

Meanwhile, Emile Cilliers had affairs and blew through money, borrowing cash from his wife, from colleagues and from loan sharks, the BBC said. He grew distant from his wife, who was thrilled when he texted her over the Easter holiday to suggest a skydiving jump together. 

At the same time, he was texting his mistress, “Have I told you lately that I am massively in love with the most amazing woman in the world? I want my life with you to start now,” The Guardian reported

The couple went to Netheravon Airfield together on April 4, 2015, the day before Easter, for the jump, which was called off due to bad weather. The BBC reported that instead of returning his wife’s parachutes to the store where they rented them, Emile Cilliers stashed them in the couple’s locker at the airfield so Victoria could use it the following day.

Prosecutors said that the defendant did so because he had taken the parachutes into a restroom and twisted the lines of the main chute to prevent it from opening, the news station reported. He also removed parts from the reserve chute.

Victoria Cilliers testified at her husband’s trial that she returned, alone, to the airfield on Easter Sunday. Her excitement for the jump was gone, but her husband encouraged her to go through with it, she said. 

“I remember the pilot giving me a smile as I went out,” she said, according to The Guardian. “Usually that’s the part that I love; the cold rush, the smell. And it just did not hit me.”

Instead, what hit her was terror as her main parachute failed to open properly. A witness on the ground that day testified at Emile Cilliers’ trial that the reserve chute resembled a bag of laundry as Victoria Cilliers was thrown around “like a rag doll.”

“I could not figure how to slow it down,” Victoria Cilliers said. “It was just getting faster and faster and faster. The speed was unreal. The last thing I remember is trying to get some kind of control, then everything went black.”

The fact that both chutes failed was such a rare occurrence that the British Parachute Association launched an inquiry. The investigation found that in about 2.3 million sport parachute jumps in the U.K. over the previous 10 years, there had never been an instance of both the main and reserve parachutes failing. 

See the British Parachute Association’s report here. 

In addition, the parachutes Victoria Cilliers used the day of her fall functioned properly when used just a day or two prior to the incident. 

The police also became involved in the investigation, during which detectives obtained texts and emails that showed details of his multiple affairs, The Guardian reported. They also learned about his financial problems. 

While investigating the gas leak at the couple’s home, police officials found spots of blood next to the gas fitting that was tampered with, the newspaper reported. 

Emile Cilliers was arrested on April 28, about two weeks after his wife’s fall. 

Coyote killing contest under fire by animal rights agencies

On Tuesday a coalition of more than 25 wildlife and animal protection organizations, including the Humane Society of the United States, delivered letters urging Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to cancel the “Georgia Coyote Challenge.”

During the six-month period from March to August the challenge offers Georgia residents the chance to win a lifetime hunting license and a new hunting rifle.

>> Read more trending news 

Residents enter to win the license by providing photo evidence of having killed a coyote. Individuals are allowed to submit up to 10 entries, each representing one coyote killed. 

It’s the second year that the challenge has been offered. Last year Georgia residents killed 195 coyotes.

Contests such as these have sparked vocal protests.

“Scientific evidence does not support the notion that indiscriminately killing coyotes through events such as the Georgia Coyote Challenge is an effective wildlife management practice,” said Camilla Fox, executive director of Project Coyote, a national organization based in Marin County, California. 

The Coyote Challenge, sponsored by Georgia’s state Department of Natural Resources, encourages the killing of coyotes between March and August.

The contest also encourages an unethical attitude, Fox said. “We are beyond killing animals for prizes and fun,” she told National Public Radio. “This should be part of our history books.”

Christopher Mowry, associate professor of biology at Berry College and director of the Atlanta Coyote Project, said, “Wildlife killing contests are antithetical to responsible hunting ethics.”

John Bowers, chief of game management for the Georgia Wildlife Resources Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, said population control is not the point of the Coyote Challenge.

“The purpose is to complement and highlight the existing lethal removal of coyotes by hunters and trappers,” he said. “They can do that year-round.”

Bowers said coyote removal is a part of game management.

“If I’m managing my property for wildlife, for deer or turkeys, and I’ve got an abundance of coyote on my property, then those coyote need to be managed, too,” Bowers said. “This is the time period. March though August is the best time period to lethally remove coyotes.”

Coyotes are seen more and more often in urban as well as rural areas.

Other states have sparked protests with similar contests, including Utah, which stages a yearly World Championship Coyote Calling Contest, in which participants try to kill as many coyotes as possible in 48 hours.

What You Need To Know: Brown Recluse Spiders

What You Need To Know: Brown Recluse Spiders

Army accepts resignation of West Point grad who wrote ‘Communism will win’ in graduation cap

A West Point graduate and Army officer has resigned after investigators said he advocated for a communist revolution.

Second Lt. Spenser Rapone, 26, received a “less than honorable discharge” from the Army on Monday, less than one year after he posted a series of photos on Twitter of his West Point graduation, displaying messages of communist support hidden under his military uniform. 

>> Read more trending news 

An Army investigation found that Rapone advocated for a socialist revolution online and made disparaging remarks about high-ranking officials, according to the Washington Post

The Pennsylvania native was nicknamed the “commie cadet” after posting the Twitter photos.

In one image, he raised his fist and showed his Army cap, with the handwritten message “Communism will win.”

In another, he opened his dress uniform to expose a T-shirt with an image of socialist icon Che Guevara.

The United States Military Academy at West Point said that his actions “in no way reflect the values of the U.S. Military Academy or the U.S. Army.”

On Monday, the Army said it had conducted a “full investigation” into Rapone’s behavior and “appropriate action was taken,” leading to Rapone’s resignation.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla), called on the secretary of the Army to remove Rapone from the officer ranks.

“While in uniform, Spenser Rapone advocated for communism and political violence, and expressed support and sympathy for enemies of the United States,” Rubio said Monday. “I'm glad to see that they have given him an ‘other-than-honorable’ discharge.”

Rapone followed up with a tweet on Monday showing him pointing his middle finger at the entrance to Fort Drum, accompanied by the words “One final salute.”

Before his time at West Point, Rapone was deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 and was an assistant machine gunner in the Khost Province.

During his deployment, he learned West Point fulfills a certain quota of accepting enlisted soldiers every year -- so he applied and and was accepted.

“I consider myself a revolutionary socialist,” Rapone told The Associated Press. “I would encourage all soldiers who have a conscience to lay down their arms and join me and so many others who are willing to stop serving the agents of imperialism and join us in a revolutionary movement.”

Greg Rinckey, an attorney specializing in military law, told the Associated Press it is rare for a West Point officer to receive a less-than-honorable discharge, and that the military academy could seek repayment of the cost of Rapone’s West Point education, because he didn’t serve the full five-year service required upon graduation.

“I knew there could be repercussions," said Rapone, who is scheduled to speak at a socialism conference in Chicago next month. “Of course my military career is dead in the water. On the other hand, many people reached out and showed me support. There are a lot of veterans both active duty and not that feel like I do.”

The Associated Press contributed to this story

Garth Brooks releases new song, 'All Day Long'

Garth Brooks took to Facebook Live Monday to debut his new single from his upcoming untitled album.

Billboard reported that the musician spoke about his new song, “All Day Long,” on his weekly show, “Inside Studio G.”

>> Read more trending news 

“From the very first lick, this song is a party,” Brooks said in a statement. “Country radio, uptempo honky-tonk and summer go so good together.”

The Tennessean reported that the single features a fiddle, steel guitar and electric guitar.

“The new music feels good,” Brooks said. “And the new music feels very old school. It sounds brand new, but it’s very old school. It’s going to be upbeat. It’s fun. It’s a little summer, man. Let’s turn it up, and have some fun.”

In addition to the new song, Brooks’ new album is available for preorder for a limited-time price of $10 on Amazon.com. Fans who preorder the album will get a download of the exclusive track “The Road I’m On.”

“All Day Long” can be streamed or downloaded on Amazon Music. A clip can be heard on Brooks’ Facebook page.

5 facts about Juneteenth, which marks the last day of slavery

June 19 marks a pivotal point in American history. On that date in 1865, the last slaves in Texas and more broadly the Confederate South were freed.

>> Read more trending news 

Nationally and in cities like Atlanta, the day has been celebrated with parades, plays and other festivities that honor the African-American culture that developed during and after slavery. 

Here are 5 answers to some of the questions posed about Juneteenth: 

Didn’t the Emancipation Proclamation end slavery years earlier?

Yes and No. Abraham Lincoln made slavery illegal with the Emancipation Proclamation on Sept. 22, 1862, which became federal law on Jan. 1, 1863. However, it took nearly two-and-half years for that message to be relayed to Texas.

How did Juneteenth begin? 

On June 19, 1865, Major Gen. Gordon Granger came to Galveston, Texas, to inform a reluctant community that President Abraham Lincoln two years earlier had freed the slaves and to press locals to comply with his directive. On this day, Granger announced “General Order No. 3.”

Prior to Granger’s declaration, there was an estimated 250,000 slaves residing in Texas, according to historian Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

>> Related: Quiz: Slavery in the U.S.

What caused the delay in Texans receiving this news?

Some have noted that Texas’ geographic isolation may have played a role in the delay. According to Juneteenth.com, some accounts place the delay on a messenger who was murdered on his way to Texas with the news, while others say the news was deliberately withheld.

Even with the order, slavery did not end in Texas overnight, according to a report by Gates. Many slave owners traveled to Texas with their slaves to escape regulations enforced by the Union Army in other states for some time.

Why is it called Juneteenth?

Juneteenth is a combination of "June" and "nineteenth," in honor of the day that Granger announced the abolition of slavery in Texas. The day is also called Freedom Day.

How are people honoring Juneteenth?

Parades, concerts and festivals will take place across country to keep the history of Juneteenth alive.

>> Trending: Parents upset over school assignment with slave lynching

Some Twitter users have already begun to share tidbits about the day’s history and plans for the holiday online.

Diabetes after age 50 could be sign of pancreatic cancer, study says

While scientists do not know the exact cause of pancreatic cancer, they believe a diabetes diagnosis after age 50 may be an early sign, according to a new report.

>> Read more trending news 

Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, to determine the relationship between the two diseases specifically among African-Americans and Latinos.

“There are very few studies on diabetes and pancreatic cancer that include Latinos and African-Americans,” lead author V. Wendy Setiawan said in a statement. “Both groups have a high rate of diabetes and African-Americans, in particular, have a higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer relative to other racial/ethnic groups.”

For the analysis, the team followed about 50,000 African-Americans and Hispanics over age 50 for about 20 years. At the beginning of the trial, none of the participants had been diagnosed with diabetes or pancreatic cancer, which has a low five-year survival rate because most people are diagnosed at a late stage. 

>> Related: Eat this common food to lower type 2 diabetes risk, study says

After reviewing the results, they found that about 16,000 of the subjects had developed adult-onset diabetes mellitus, also known as Type 2 diabetes, and 400 had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer during the two-decade period.

Upon further examination, they discovered that people who were diagnosed with Type II diabetes between the ages of 65 and 85 were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer within three years compared to those without diabetes. 

In fact, Latinos were four times more likely to develop pancreatic cancer after developing early onset diabetes, and African-Americans were three times as likely. 

>> Related: Study finds rare gain for tough-to-treat pancreatic cancer

“What we found is that, yes, diabetes is associated with pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but we also discovered that there is a different type of diabetes here, a late-onset diabetes that’s associated with developing pancreatic cancer within 36 months,” Setiawan explained. “The evidence suggests that late-onset diabetes may be an early sign of pancreatic cancer.”

While the scientists are still unclear about the factors that link diabetes with pancreatic cancer, they did reveal that there was no association between breast, prostate or colorectal cancer and late on-set diabetes. 

They now hope to continue their investigations and believe their findings can help detect pancreatic cancer early, especially among high-risk groups.

>> Related: New app uses selfies to help screen for pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is a rare disease, but if you are diagnosed with late-onset diabetes, have a conversation with your clinician about your individual risk,” Setiawan said. “Early intervention could improve survival.” 

Backlash over immigration policy continues | Your Daily Pitch

Backlash over immigration policy continues | Your Daily Pitch

What You Need To Know: Heather Locklear

What You Need To Know: Heather Locklear
200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >